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No. of 110 calls not for emergencies topped 2 mil in 2014, NPA says

16 Comments

The National Police Agency says that there were more than 2 million calls made to 110 last year across Japan, which were not categorized as being an emergency.

The NPA said in a report released Saturday (Jan 10) to mark "110 Emergency Call Day," that in 2014, there were 8,524,175 calls made to 110 in Japan. Of those, 2,069,889, or 24.3%, were considered by the police to be unnecessary, NHK reported Sunday.

Police said that most of the calls were related to traffic accidents, accounting for 29.9% of the total.

The unnecessary or nuisance calls included complaints about no toilet paper in public restrooms, vending machines that didn't give change, and questions such as, "How do I update my driver's license?"

The NPA plans to conduct campaigns to raise public awareness on when it is appropriate to call 110 and when it isn't.

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16 Comments
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Does this figure include those old and/or mentally deranged people that have a habit of calling the police literally thousands of times a day? I haven't seen any articles about them too recently, but they do crop up every few months.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The problem is that folks here don't have a hell of a lot of respect for the police.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The problem is that folks here don't have a hell of a lot of respect for the police.

wonder why?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

The problem is that folks here don't have a hell of a lot of respect for the police.

Really? I've found that the Japanese, with their unquestioning acceptance of authority, generally respect the police a lot more than people do in my home country, where many express outright hatred of the police.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

In Japan we support and respect our police officers. They do their job because they love it and because they feel called to serve the community. And we appreciate everything they do. For most community residents, community police officers are both tough crime fighters and friendly protectors. We call them "omawari-san" - Dear patrol officer with a degree of respect and affection. The term conveys the image of someone who is gentle but strong, like a big brother or uncle.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

@ Novenachama

Its a cute idea but don't you also see them as people who opt for a easy salary and pension to follow plus lots of bonus time sitting on there brains in the toasty warm Koban. Not to mention what type of person grows up wanting to be a police officer, in any culture >_<

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Novenachama: "They do their job because they love it and because they feel called to serve the community."

Pretty broad generalization, I'd say. Every year you hear of a few cases of young police officers eating a bullet in or outside a Koban while on duty; I don't think THEY liked their jobs very much.

"community police officers are both tough crime fighters and friendly protectors."

Except for the many, many who grope, steal panties, drink and drive (and flee the accidents that follow), and commit other crimes, right?

Anyway, in regard to the calls, they need to address the obvious nuisance calls more seriously. People who call about there being no toilet paper and take up the lines when there could be serious emergencies need to be fined. There are times when the person's mental abilities may later result in the fine being retracted, but there are some people who seriously abuse the system.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The problem is that folks here don't have a hell of a lot of respect for the police.

Really? You should visit Holland sometimes, lately a lof of news about people attacking police or even paramedics while doing their job, trust me it's not that bad in Japan yet.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The problem is that gaijin folks here don't have a hell of a lot of respect for the police.

there. i fixed it for ya.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Start fining people for these unnecessary calls...problem solved

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I agree. Fine them and the calls will stop. 110 for Emergencies ONLY.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pretty broad generalization, I'd say. Every year you hear of a few cases of young police officers eating a bullet in or outside a Koban while on duty; I don't think THEY liked their jobs very much.

Yes smith. At least Novenachama does not make generalizations based on, as you state, "few cases".

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Simple solution, press 1 for emergency and press 2 for other with non emergency calls being charged 500 yen per call added to a persons phone bill if its not considered an emergency.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Really? I've found that the Japanese, with their unquestioning acceptance of authority, generally respect the police a lot more than people do in my home country, where many express outright hatred of the police.

Hence the need to send 50 cops to handle a fight between two 70 year old drunks? People do not respect the police, they show respect to the person as they generally do with all folks here.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Hence the need to send 50 cops to handle a fight between two 70 year old drunks?

You seem to be confusing cause and effect.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Maybe it's time to adopt a similar service like the 3-1-1 service:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3-1-1

The telephone number 3-1-1 is a special telephone number supported in many communities in Canada and the United States which provides access to non-emergency municipal services.

The number 3-1-1 is intended in part to divert routine inquiries and non-urgent community concerns from the 9-1-1 number which is reserved for emergency service only. A promotional website for 3-1-1 in Akron described the distinction as follows: "Burning building? Call 9-1-1. Burning Question? Call 3-1-1."

Several European countries have adopted, or are adopting, non-emergency numbers for similar purposes as 3-1-1.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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