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No. of people aged 65 and over in Japan tops 34.6 million

17 Comments

The number of people in Japan aged 65 and over was approximately 34,610,000, the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications said on Monday, which is Respect for the Aged Day, a national holiday. The number, as of Sept 15, represents about 27.3% of Japan's total population.

Of the total, 14.99 million were men and 19.62 million were women, the ministry said.

Last week, the welfare ministry reported that Japan’s centenarian population increased by 4,124 from a year ago to a record high of 65,692 in September, with women accounting for 87.6% of the total. This is the 46th straight year that the number of centenarians has increased.

Life expectancy in Japan was 87.05 for women and 80.79 for men in 2015, the ministry said.

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17 Comments
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Oh brilliant!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This is expected...it's what happens after that matters!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

What do these statistics say about the quality of the Japanese health care system and life in Japan in general?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I often feel like I live in a huge old people's theme park.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Ah, but are they really all still alive?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I read somewhere that old people's diapers are outsold that of infants'.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@yoshidashoin - I think it shows that Japan has an EXCELLENT healthcare system, but with a terrible lifestyle and that's why people don't want to have children to replace the people over the age of 65.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I think it shows that Japan has an EXCELLENT healthcare system, but with a terrible lifestyle and that's why people don't want to have children to replace the people over the age of 65.

The fertility rate in Japan is essentially the same as that of Italy and Germany at 1.4. There are more than twenty countries with a lower fertility rate than Japan including Singapore, Portugal, Spain, Korea, and Taiwan.

It's a very miserable world we live in but if you are in Tokyo (1.13), you can take comfort in knowing that people in Shanghai are even worse off. There the fertility rate is 0.70.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/community/2016/02/10/voices/japan-birth-rate-beginning-end-just-new-beginning/#.V9-9Zoh95yw

1 ( +6 / -5 )

A doctor once told me that Japanese people live a long time despite the doctors here...!

3 ( +5 / -2 )

@bullfighter - It is unfortunate that Shanghai has such a low fertility rate, but China as a country isn't going to lose almost 20 million people within the next 30 years, which is going to happen to Japan. The corporations refuse to address this issue.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@Tony Alderman

You nailed it man! Said it better than I could have.

"A old persons theme park!" I know thats not all of japan but its spot on for where i am as well.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"27.3% of Japan’s total population." That is insane! Especially when you think that the vast majority of these people sit inside their homes and their apt 99% of the time (sadly... watching oh so horrible "variety" TV.)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Tony Alderman

A doctor once told me that Japanese people live a long time despite the doctors here...!

So glad to know I'm not the only one to think so !

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That is insane! Especially when you think that the vast majority of these people sit inside their homes and their apt 99% of the time (sadly... watching oh so horrible "variety" TV.)

99%?

Have you ever taken a really early morning train out of Tokyo especially those going in the direction of Yamanashi, Okutama, or Chichibu?

You'll see many older people heading to the mountains for casual climbing or hiking. I've gone hiking with older son (aged 16) in the Agano area. Many, many older people hiking including elderly couples and groups of elderly women.

Have you ever visited any of facilities run by newspapers and local governments where people can pursue hobby activities, learn a new language, etc? Heavily older people.

Have you ever taken a Tokyo-London flight? I do regularly. Quite a number of retirement age Japanese couples or groups of older women.

China as a country isn't going to lose almost 20 million people within the next 30 years, which is going to happen to Japan. The corporations refuse to address this issue.

Maybe not, but China already has more people over the age of 65 than the entire population of Japan and because of the low fertility rate (1.6 compared to 1.4 in Japan, stasis requires 2.1), China is set to age in a way that will make Japan look like a nation of youngsters.

Japanese corporations are in fact paying attention to the declining population. Keidanren, for better or worse, has been calling for the introduction of immigrant labor. Companies like Rakuten and UniQlo have been expanding in foreign markets with a more youthful population. A major reason Abe is pushing on Africa and India is because both have an expanding youth population.

A doctor once told me that Japanese people live a long time despite the doctors here

Which proves what? People say all sorts of things. That does not make what they say to be true.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

People live forever here because they go to their local clinic for no matter what.When you only gotta pay 300 yen a pop, well put it to use,no?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

People live long lives here because:

good diet: low calory fresh food continuous activity: never stopping to walk (does not mean they are efficient...) absence of risk: Low crime country and no going into any risky situation (except about water drowning perhaps) good health system: top quality hospitals where you pay little in fact general cleanliness: little germs around (wearing masks is helping whatever one may think)
-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Westerners often explain longevity of Japan's aging population by attributing it to diet, healthcare, etc. while ignoring the obvious factors such as social harmony, civility, respect for elders and most importantly 'we culture vs me culture.'

My theory is that these factors are ignored because it highlights the severe deficiencies in their own countries where obesity, heart disease and cancer rates are very high while also questioning their fundamental values.

Such factors have a huge impact on well-being and quality of life, especially for the elderly.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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