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No. of drivers in Japan aged 70 or older tops 10 million

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 11.95 million drivers aged 70 or older, making up 14.5 percent of the total number of licenses.

2019 accident in Ikebukuro, where Kozo Iizuka, 87-year-old driver crash to mother and daughter just shows how danger it is

1 ( +5 / -4 )

sakurasukiToday  07:19 am JST

 11.95 million drivers aged 70 or older, making up 14.5 percent of the total number of licenses.

2019 accident in Ikebukuro, where Kozo Iizuka, 87-year-old driver crash to mother and daughter just shows how danger it is

As I recall, accidents are being caused by those of all ages. Even Police have kill kids. Bus drivers cause accidents resulting in injury and death, young drivers same. To focus on those 70 and older is wrong. I know many over 70 that are of sound mind and are still driving and with Gold Cards.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

The elderly drivers can be a danger to both pedestrians and other drivers. However, there are many more and far worse dangers in Japanese roads like, cowboy truckers, speeders, inattentive drivers playing games and texting on their phones and the ever present road ragers.

In general, driver manners are quite good in Japan, but there are way to many ratbags who ignore the laws and put others at risk.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

That's why my home country implemented a new policy, that after turning 70, you have a regular driving ability check every 5 years done by a government appointed independent doctor (not your usual doctor).

The tests consists of eye test (visual), reaction time, general health etc.

If the doctor doesn't declare you fit to drive anymore, your license will be voided immediately.

They should implement that in japan too, and not shift the responsibility to car manufacturers with "safety features".

4 ( +6 / -2 )

harsher penalties for road rage incidents

Most, if not all, road rage incidents were by drivers in the 20s and 30s. It is irrelevant to this article about older drivers.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Far too many. Get them all off the roads

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

Public transportation in rural areas and smaller cities is totally inadequate and so many old people live alone with no support systems. They need their cars to survive. Until the public transport system changes, or the government provides vouchers for taxi fare, don't expect old people to just hand in their licenses voluntarily.

I would say the first step is to ensure they have a means to get around other than their own car. Only after that is done, start more frequent eye and mobility checks for old people and remove licenses when necessary.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I bet a lot of them are Citrus reticula deficient; dementia, as well as poor situational road awareness nearly always affects them.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Regardless of your opinions on aged drivers vs younger drivers, the fact stated in the article remains - 55.4% of ALL deaths are caused by 65 year olds or over.

The article states that 70+ yr olds make up 14.5% of drivers. I'm assuming if we add the 65- 69 group to that we would probably see 20% (give or take) of all drivers.

That is a startling statistic that can't be ignored. That demographic - which I'm close to - is way way over represented. No argument.

Meaning , sadly older drivers are responsible for 2.5+ times more deaths than their numbers indicate.

And on this topic, I've stated many times before - the most realistic stat is deaths per billions of kms driven.

The more driving the more risk. The elderly don't drive the distances that younger drivers do, so the weight on those percentages is even more heavily impacted in the negative.

Technology can and is helping. But a more thorough assessment of a drivers capabilities (of ALL ages) is warranted. We demand it of other license holding workers in the transport industry - bus drivers, truck, train, pilots, etc , so why not apply more stringent testing?

IMO, one reason is that demographic is a big support base for the govt, so coming down hard on them will realize fewer votes. I can't see any other logical reason for not making stricter driver assessment of the elderly a normal part of the process.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It's the government's fault for not providing affordable transportation services for the elderly.

No choice for them drive or starve.

Japan take a close look at other countries.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

I look forward to fully automated self-driving cars in the next 5-10 years on all models. Get in, order the car where to go by voice command, then sit back, relax or sleep. There will be no more problems with old people confusing the controls and crashing.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Give them free taxi coupons for life it they surrender their licenses and sell their vehicles, or restrict them to driving on tambo roads where necessary.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The total number of deaths is falling even as the number of older drivers increases. The percentage of deaths caused by older drivers is concerning, and means that it is worth targeting them to make the roads safer, but the total number coming down means that there should be no panic about carnage on the roads. The opposite is happening, probably due to auto braking and airbags.

We drive a lot in terms of distance here in inaka, but mostly along straight roads with few junctions. My in-laws live in the suburbs and there are far more cars and a junction every 200m. Most accidents happen at junctions, so deaths per km driven is not always going to be very relevant.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Sandro - That's why my home country implemented a new policy, that after turning 70, you have a regular driving ability check every 5 years done by a government appointed independent doctor (not your usual doctor).

Cognitive tests for over seventies are done every six months in Japan. Believe it or not. I get the feeling the tests are not stringent or difficult.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Now this is a good idea, like having a bus pass but good for places with no buses. I lived in one, couldn't imaging not driving.

Give them free taxi coupons for life it they surrender their licenses and sell their vehicles

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There is a special extra test which you now have to take before you can renew at 70, for a five-year extension, and then from 75 it is before each renewal every three years.

Things are already stricter than they were a few years ago, and this, combined with the fitment of such aids as automatic braking, will surely be helping reduce the numbers of elderly accidents.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm curious.

Does Japan ever solve any of their national problematic issues?

It seems like we keep hearing the same problems and having the same weak solutions and nothing ever gets done.

What does any of our elected officials do all day anyway? I mean besides making obvious statements to the public.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Paper drivers are the real concern. Biggest road hazards out there.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No Wonder I've been getting late to work lately.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If and when other means of transportation are available and affordable, then we will see less seniors driving, util then they will continue on driving to the doctor, the grocery store, and to see the grand kids.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Tricycles with baskets in the back. That's the solution. Perhaps with electric assist motors.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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