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Nobel prize winner, activist Kenzaburo Oe dies at 88

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A great man and a life well lived.

Because of that I am sure he will RIP.

After I read his books I realized not all Japanese were like Abe and Takaichi.

A true legend.

17 ( +19 / -2 )

Can't be too sad for a mans passing at 88.

But Oe as an intellectual giant of post-war Japan, together with his immense creativity and powerful activism, he will be sorely missed.

Never shied away from confronting the establishment esp the right wing and incumbent politicians.

Never afraid to speak his mind.

I first knew of him many years ago when I read his novel Nip the buds, Shoot the kids.

The story has never left me.

Japan needs Minds like Oe's as it navigates the coming decades.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

I can imagine he was very sad looking at the recent resurgence of militarism.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Respectful farewell to Nobel prize winner, activist Kenzaburo Oe.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

His brain-damaged son Hikari also became a driving force of his literature. Hikari was for years unable to communicate with his family but as an adult became known as a composer. Oe has said that much of his writing was an attempt to give Hikari a voice.

Several of Oe's books have characters based on Hikari, with one, "A Personal Matter," talking about difficulties accepting the child. The Nobel committee singled out a number of these books when he won the prize in 1994

Literature is pearls before swine with me although I did read ‘A Personal Matter’. Very powerful book. One you don’t forget.

Not afraid to rock the boat either with his opinions.

Sounds like a life well lived.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Kenzaburo Oe was just 10 when the war ended.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

I do not recognize any authority, any value, higher than democracy.

Amazing!

I remember when he received the Nobel prize in my county.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

All life comes to pass. A life lived and enjoyed. Peacefully gone without suffering. His works will live on.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

"I do not recognize any authority, any value, higher than democracy."

A sadly lacking ideal that could have avoided much of the abhorrent behaviour in human history.

Thank you and rest well Oe sama.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Kenzaburo Oe was a great writer, but above that he was a fearless fighter for democracy and peace. He is sorely missed.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Ten years old when Japan was defeated in World War II, Oe was scarred by his memories, which included being asked in school every day if he was willing to die for the emperor and feeling shame when realizing in bed at night that he wasn't.

Child abuse comes in many forms, not least from government propaganda and gaslighting.

One of my treasured memories is when I attended an Oe lecture and had a chance to speak with him, a Japanese who had succeeded in escaping the mental chains of the narrow nationalism he had imbibed as a defenseless child, and who humbly wore his humanity on his sleeve. Oe has now left us, but his books will continue to inspire the best of Japan to make common cause with others to build a better world for Hikari and other children. RIP a Japanese writer who towered above all the mindless kitsch and pulp of modern Japanese pop culture.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The post is about the passing of a Nobel Peace Laureate. Appreciate what he achieved, which is a great deal, not what he didn't.

Since 1949, there have been 29 Japanese laureates for the Nobel Prize.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

We, at the Nippon Academy, Chattogram, Bangladesh are sad at the demise of the outstanding person. Kenzaburo Oe shall be remembered by many for very long time. We offer our sincerest condolences to the bereaved near and dear ones.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

When one's only son is mentally-handicapped must have been a destiny in which no man in the world would wish to face. Yet Kenzaburo faced his his own and, and, his son Hikari's unfortunate destiny with a hero's bravery which profoundly affected his writing to win him the Nobel Literature Prize.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Mr.Kenzaburo was a very wise man and a superior mind,for sure his departure from this world is a great loss for the collectivity.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

A life well lived for a great man, both as a writer and as an activist. I've read some of his works. He will be sorely missed. May he rest in peace. :'(

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One of my treasured memories is when I attended an Oe lecture and had a chance to speak with him, a Japanese who had succeeded in escaping the mental chains of the narrow nationalism he had imbibed as a defenseless child, and who humbly wore his humanity on his sleeve. Oe has now left us, but his books will continue to inspire the best of Japan to make common cause with others to build a better world for Hikari and other children. RIP a Japanese writer who towered above all the mindless kitsch and pulp of modern Japanese pop culture.

Thank you for sharing, that's re-assuring he wasn't a closet nationalist fraud and yes, modern societies a cesspool of selfishness and cowardice with a LARGE dose of dishonesty mixed in for good measure but let's all hope and pray more greats are on the way ASAP!!!

Same. All those words above.

El héroe!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

RIP, condolences to the family

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Looking at how the arts and science in Japan are no longer being supported it can be expected that the rates of Nobel prizes from Japanese people will keep decreasing, which is a loss for the country 

Well, a Nobel prize isnt what it used to be. Its getting up there with the Oscars for irrelevancy.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Japan bore "some" responsibility for the war, he said in a 2014 interview.

You dont say.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Japan bore "some" responsibility for the war, he said in a 2014 interview.

Thats one interesting “peace activist”.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

He did not bow too the emperor

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The post is about the passing of a Nobel Peace Laureate. Appreciate what he achieved, which is a great deal, not what he didn't.

Since 1949, there have been 29 Japanese laureates for the Nobel Prize.

Looking at how the arts and science in Japan are no longer being supported it can be expected that the rates of Nobel prizes from Japanese people will keep decreasing, which is a loss for the country but a win for those countries that make the advancement of humanity a real priority.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

One of my treasured memories is when I attended an Oe lecture and had a chance to speak with him, a Japanese who had succeeded in escaping the mental chains of the narrow nationalism he had imbibed as a defenseless child, and who humbly wore his humanity on his sleeve. Oe has now left us, but his books will continue to inspire the best of Japan to make common cause with others to build a better world for Hikari and other children. RIP a Japanese writer who towered above all the mindless kitsch and pulp of modern Japanese pop culture.

Thank you for sharing, that's re-assuring he wasn't a closet nationalist fraud and yes, modern societies a cesspool of selfishness and cowardice with a LARGE dose of dishonesty mixed in for good measure but let's all hope and pray more greats are on the way ASAP!!!

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Japan bore "some" responsibility for the war, he said in a 2014 interview.

"Some," eh. And that's the thinking of an outspoken "Pacificist." Makes one wonder how most Japanese view their country's responsibility for the war it instigated. Maybe "none"?

-17 ( +3 / -20 )

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