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Noda says Japan will boost coast security

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Translation: Since it is apparent that the US is not going to do anything but give vague promises, Japan is forced to defend itself.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

"“While observing the pacifism that is a pillar of our constitution.."

Which is why China continues it's aggression.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

taro67Oct. 30, 2012 - 07:35AM JST Translation: Since it is apparent that the US is not going to do anything but give vague promises, Japan is forced to >defend itself.

How is that apparent when the US Sec of Defense has already told China that the U.S. will defend the Senkakus militrarily and China is whining about it?

2 ( +5 / -3 )

How is that apparent when the US Sec of Defense has already told China that the U.S. will defend the Senkakus militrarily and China is whining about it?

It would seem that if China felt threatened by the words of the US, they would stop pushing the issue. So, you tell me...since it is increasingly apparent that China doesn't believe the US, why should Japan?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

It would seem that if China felt threatened by the words of the US, they would stop pushing the issue. So, you tell me...since it is increasingly apparent that China doesn't believe the US, why should Japan?

Why does it have to be that the US doesn't mean it, instead of that China don't care? North Korea still regularly antagonizes its neighbors - but that doesn't mean that the US wouldn't back South Korea if a war broke out.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

taro67 Oct. 30, 2012 - 07:48AM JST It would seem that if China felt threatened by the words of the US, they would stop pushing the issue. So, you tell me...since it is increasingly apparent that China doesn't believe the US, why should Japan?

Why would China be threatened if U.S. is continuing to look at all the angles for diplomacy on resolvement of the dispute? Most of the people in China are clueless on the historical complexity of Senkaku/Daiyou islands. Most still believe in propaganda views of the Chinese goverment. The Chinese goverment should act with more diplomacy, but continue to choose on assertive one-diminsional viewpoint, which is 1950's Mao's viewpoint of force.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Why does it have to be that the US doesn't mean it, instead of that China don't care?

Given the size and power of the US military, the only reason that China doesn't care is that they don't believe the US will act militarily.

As for South Korea, they have the 7th most powerful military in the world, 2nd most powerful in Asia (ex. US). North Korea is ranked 22nd, lower than such powerhouses as Thailand and Poland.

While the US can rightly claim that its heavy presence in Asia (Japan and S Korea) has prevented serious incidents in the past, it seems that those days are gone and unless it is willing to do more than offer vague promises to its allies, it behooves the ally to prepare to act alone if necessary.

The US has way too many conflicts of interests in Asia to be an effective defender of Japan except under conditions of total regional war. China seems to be playing the strategy that will fall short of that while calling America's bluff on small conflicts.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Most of the people in China are clueless on the historical complexity of Senkaku/Daiyou islands. Most still believe in propaganda views of the Chinese goverment.

The views of the Chinese people are irrelevant to the discussion. Most Americans also believe the propaganda of the US government and the same is true in Japan. What China SHOULD do is also irrelevant.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

taro67 Oct. 30, 2012 - 08:34AM JST The views of the Chinese people are irrelevant to the discussion.

You are correct. That is the view of the Chinese goverment. The Chinese goverment are not concerned with the views of their own people, and they don't care. No wonder nobody is elected to the office like the U.S. That is what they call dictator system.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

PAPER TIGER!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

We will be pouring concrete again to build Martello Towers or those bunker things that are littered all over albania.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

With a permanent support base on the islands or more ships ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

China is just pushing the issue as far as they can hoping the Japanese will just give up and let the Chinese "jointly develop" the fisheries surrounding Senkaku.

The US generally does not get involved in territorial disputes and prefers that China and Japan sit down and make a deal. At the same time the US is clear that they will remove any Chinese force that tries to occupy the islands or sink any Chinese ship that fires on a Japanese vessel.

The Japanese and Chinese just need to figure out how long they want to keep up this game. Both sides are losing out here.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Have greater concerns over Noda possibly seeking to steer away people's attention from the real issues at hand. Looking at his premiership this past year or so turns out the only clear political agenda he seems to have had was pushing the tax hike bill through, indifferent to all else whether it be the economy, education, healthcare or national security. Much of his political career has been about playing the puppet role for the Finance Ministry. In a way he sacrificed his own reputation to fulfil his said role through making and breaking the critical promise he made to Tanigaki to call for an election asap should LDP agree to pass the bill. In Japan (or anywhere else for that matter) not easy to regain trust after breaking such an important promise (which is presumably a major factor behind the sharp decline in his approval ratings) and in that sense he has already crossed the Ribicon, indeed why I fear he may now be in a position to do whatever it takes to maintain his premiership possibly at the risk of further deterioration of Japan/China relations.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Noda was born in Funabashi, Chiba on 20 May 1957, the son of a member of the Japan Self-Defense Forces.[ Unlike many prominent Japanese politicians, Noda has no family connections to Nagatachō. His parents were too poor to pay for a wedding reception He has a black belt in judo.

I am a big fan of Noda. His leadership skill has not been fairly evaluated among Japanese voters.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

They should make sure they get the money from Ishihara's failed bid for this. Extra patrols cost more money, and Japan needs to be spending money elsewhere right now.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

globalwatcher:

His leadership skill has not been fairly evaluated among Japanese voters.

Agree he may be better than his DPJ predecessors, Hatoyama in particular who was the key responsible figure in creating the political mess for DPJ in the first place, but that should not necessarily mean he has admirable leadership skills altogether. Very difficult to name one thing his leadership succeeded in achieving other than the sales tax bill (which in itself remains largely debatable and likely to be pushed aside under Abe who will prioritize pulling out of deflation first). While I can imagine the immense pressure the Finance Ministry must have placed on Noda, still believe he could have done much better should he have been more able to directly connect with the people (ie voters) than the bureaucrats.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Noda or Coast guard or air craft carrier or sub marine can stop Taiwanese fishermen. Their forefathers have been fishing there for centuries. They will come and go as they pleased. Fishermen can not be intimidated in their own backyard.

The language of Fishermen is fish not the politics. They will not surrender their ancestral fishing rights until their last breath.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Just got done reading a book titled The next 100 Years by George Friedman and it paints a terrifying image of the future. It reads that Japan will rebuild its military and again try overtaking the APR region again...... I know its ficticious look into the future but with the situation with China and Korea this might just happen.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

taro67Oct. 30, 2012 - 07:48AM JST "How is that apparent when the US Sec of Defense has already told China that the U.S. will defend the Senkakus militrarily and China is whining about it?"

It would seem that if China felt threatened by the words of the US, they would stop pushing the issue. So, you tell >me...since it is increasingly apparent that China doesn't believe the US, why should Japan?

China is threatened enough by the U.S. position that they will not risk trying to take the Senkakus by military force. Despite calls within China from military leaders to street mobs to do so. China continues to push the issue but not the cross the line of drawing a U.S. response. Why haven't China sent any PLAN vessels to the Senkakus?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Flyfalcon

Ancestral as in after power boats became affortable right?

Senkaku from Taiwan is about 200Km. Sailing there to fish and back would be a day and a half journey or more depending on wind and current not really practical as fishing grounds since you didn't have refrigerator on the boats as well. Lot easier to fish around the coast of Taiwan back in those days when fish was plentiful.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Beer4meOct. 30, 2012 - 11:22AM JST Just got done reading a book titled The next 100 Years by George Friedman and it paints a terrifying image of the >future. It reads that Japan will rebuild its military and again try overtaking the APR region again...... I know its >ficticious look into the future but with the situation with China and Korea this might just happen.

Wyhat's so frightrening about a peaceful democratic ally of thge United States being dominant in gthe APR? Far better than a one party authoritarian dictatorship like China hell bent on exapanding i';s borders and subjugating all of Asia,, anddirectly challenging tghe United States. Even if Japan dumps it;s Article 9 and rebuilds it;sd military, sometjing which can only happen from threats from China, Japan isn't going backl to Imperialism or Militarism.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

SamuraiBlueOct. 30, 2012 - 12:05PM JST

Senkaku from Taiwan is about 200Km. Sailing there to fish and back would be a day and a half journey or more depending on wind and current not really practical as fishing grounds since you didn't have refrigerator on the boats as well. Lot easier to fish around the coast of Taiwan back in those days when fish was plentiful.

Fishermen have been fishing there for centuries. in olden days, they made the trip of sleep over on boats. It is more than 2000 km away Japan. No one or nothing can tell them to stop their unlimited fishing rights. They assume that it is their birth rights as back -yard of their home.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@ OssanAmerica

"How is it apparent that the US Secretary of Defence has already told China.........US will defend the Senkaku mililtarily...

I read that the US Secretary of Defence and other officials have stated that US is to stay neutral on the disputed Island SenKaku(Japan) and DiaoyuIslands(China) between Japan and China but they are obligated under the US=Japan Treaty to come to its aid. In my opinion I don't think China will not attack Japan unless Japan make the first strike and China retaliate. Under such a scenario it would be interesting to see how US would react.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ RedCliff

Note correction

I don't think China would attack instead of China will not attack.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The Nationalists on both sides are laughing all the way to the bank, while the sheeple are getting fleeced and begging for more.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Why haven't China sent any PLAN vessels to the Senkakus?

The issue is not what China does or doesn't do but why Japan feels the need to defend itself given the decades-long security treaty with its closest ally. I say it is because it has little faith in the US resolve because the US has done nothing but talk. Look at Syria. The US is, supposedly, not involved militarily but sent 200 "elite" troops to the Syrian border. China pushes ally Japan and and there is no counter from the US. It even cancelled the "take back the Senkakus" exercise.

With all of America's conflicts of interests in Asia (Chinese investments, debt held by the Chinese, US ally Taiwan taking the PRC side on the issue, growing unrest in South Korea over a similar claim against Japan, China backing Iran, etc), life is perhaps getting complicated for the US and know one knows which interest will dominate in the end. Luck favors the prepared, something Japan may finally be learning.

Of course, you may be right. But you can't be sure and neither, apparently, can Japan. On the other hand, this might simply be an American ploy to scare Japan into rescinding Article 9 so it can join the US in its many, many wars around the world. Who knows what schemes the Americans are working on?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

wow $5 billion US on their Coast Guard?! That's a lot of doe, I dont think the US even spends that much on their coast guard force haha they better have Search and Rescue helicopters armed with Hellseeking missles and 15 inch cannons

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I thought the Coast Guard is only equiped with Machine guns attached to their decks, the PRC sent a couple ships with missles armed onboard!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Looks like the first step towards re-militarization.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

RedcliffOct. 30, 2012 - 12:16PM JST @ OssanAmerica "How is it apparent that the US Secretary of Defence has already told China.........US will defend the Senkaku >mililtarily...

I read that the US Secretary of Defence and other officials have stated that US is to stay neutral on the disputed >Island SenKaku(Japan) and DiaoyuIslands(China) between Japan and China but they are obligated under the >US=Japan Treaty to come to its aid. In my opinion I don't think China will not attack Japan unless Japan make the >first strike and China retaliate. Under such a scenario it would be interesting to see how US would react.

First off I suggest you read the contents of ARticle 9 of the Japanes constitution. It prohibits the use of military force to solve diplomatic issues. In other words, Japan conducting a "first strike" is out of he question, a fact well known to China. Secondly, look at China's behavior in terms of the Phillines and Vietnam, both of whom China is playing the same territorial expansion games. THen form an opinion on whether China wouldbe the first to use military force or not.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

taro67Oct. 30, 2012 - 12:45PM JST "Why haven't China sent any PLAN vessels to the Senkakus?"

The issue is not what China does or doesn't do but why Japan feels the need to defend itself given the decades->long security treaty with its closest ally. I say it is because it has little faith in the US resolve because the US has >done nothing but talk.

Because since 1960 under the US-Japan Mutuial Defense Treaty, Japan has been responsible for defending it's borders.All throughout the cold war JASDF fighters challenged and tagged Soviet planes from Hokkaido to Okinawa. If any country should attack Japan however, the U.S. is obligated to defend Japan. Hence, the issiue is bvery what China does or doesn't do. China is doing everything possible to be belligerent and aggressive towards Japan short of triggering a U.S. response.This parallels China's behavior towards the other Asian countries that it is bullying.

Look at Syria. The US is, supposedly, not involved militarily but sent 200 "elite" troops to the Syrian border. China >pushes ally Japan and and there is no counter from the US. It even cancelled the "take back the Senkakus" >exercise.

The"island takeback" excercise was already completed in Guam in September. That the US and Japan cancelled the latter part was an act designed to provoke de-escalation from China. If you somehow interpret this to mean the the US-Japan miolitary alliance is not rock solid you are grossly mistaken.The US still has two carrier croups in the East and South China Seas.

with all of America's conflicts of interests in Asia (Chinese investments, debt held by the Chinese, US ally Taiwan >taking the PRC side on the issue, growing unrest in South Korea over a similar claim against Japan, China backing >Iran, etc), life is perhaps getting complicated for the US and know one knows which interest will dominate in the >nd. Luck favors the prepared, something Japan may finally be learning.

First off, Taiwan has stated that they are not "taking PRC side" in the Senkaku issue. And Chinese held US treasuries are about to be surpassed by Japanwithin a month or two, not that it gives any real power to China over the United States as many China supporters believe. Howver you are correct in ythat there are many events unfolding in East Asia which requires adept manouvering byu the United States.But that will ot include reducing our position in our bilateral and collivecrelatins with our Asian allies or becomming subsrevient to Chinese hegemony.

Of course, you may be right. But you can't be sure and neither, apparently, can Japan. On the other hand, this might >simply be an American ploy to scare Japan into rescinding Article 9 so it can join the US in its many, many wars >around the world. Who knows what schemes the Americans are working on?

Considering that abnti-Japanese "Patriotic Education" has been in use in China's schools since the 1980s how could the U.S. possibly be "behind" this? China is doing Japan a big favor if it causes Japan to amend or abolish Article 9. All by themselves.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Howver you are correct in ythat there are many events unfolding in East Asia which requires adept manouvering byu the United States.But that will ot include reducing our position in our bilateral and collivecrelatins with our Asian allies or becomming subsrevient to Chinese hegemony.

Please use a spell checker, it is difficult to understand. That said, as in all things, cui bono? Who benefits? For instance, Japanese automakers are taking a beating on their massive investments in China. Meanwhile, US automakers are increasing their investments in China while the US plays word games over the Senkakus. To suggest that this is not a part of the US "manouvering" ignores Obama's interest in American automakers which have so far cost American taxpayers $25 billion since the failed bailout.

Considering that abnti-Japanese "Patriotic Education" has been in use in China's schools since the 1980s how could the U.S. possibly be "behind" this? China is doing Japan a big favor if it causes Japan to amend or abolish Article 9. All by themselves.

This is irrelevant to Japan's actions because, according to the US (propaganda), China has always been a threat to Japan, one which the US has used to keep its massive forces in Japan. It is the actions that the US takes or doesn't take which determines how safe Japan feels. Additionally, the US has been pushing Japan to amend Article 9 almost since it was written. Now that Japan actually does face a threat from China (for the first time), it may feel it cannot trust the US completely. Your defense of the US sounds more like "talking points" from the Obama administration or the military than any reflection of what is happening. "Trust us" seems to mean less and less when coming from the US these days.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

taro67Oct. 30, 2012 - 11:54PM JST "Howver you are correct in ythat there are many events unfolding in East Asia which requires adept manouvering byu the United States.But that will ot include reducing our position in our bilateral and collivecrelatins with our Asian allies or becomming subsrevient to Chinese hegemony."

Please use a spell checker, it is difficult to understand.

Sorry but complaining about spelling has been considered an internet no-no since the nid 90s. Please live with it,

That said, as in all things, cui bono? Who benefits? For instance, Japanese automakers are taking a beating on >their massive investments in China. Meanwhile, US automakers are increasing their investments in China while the >US plays word games over the Senkakus. To suggest that this is not a part of the US "manouvering" ignores Obama's interest in American automakers which >have so far cost American taxpayers $25 billion since the failed bailout.

Yes Japanese auto makers sales have taken a beating. But so have Chinese auto makers because of the decrease in domestic demand. Please show me where US auto makjers are "increasing" hteir investmebnts? China dampened foreign investmebnt in whole car manufactuing in the begining of 2012. More importabntrly, although you persist in wanting to place the blame on the United States, you have failed to describe exactly what action or actions the U.S. has taken to aggravate the Senkaku issue.

Considering that anti-Japanese "Patriotic Education" has been in use in China's schools since the 1980s how >could the U.S. possibly be "behind" this? China is doing Japan a big favor if it causes Japan to amend or abolish >Article 9. All by themselves.

This is irrelevant to Japan's actions because, according to the US (propaganda), China has always been a threat to >Japan, one which the US has used to keep its massive forces in Japan. It is the actions that the US takes or doesn't >take which determines how safe Japan feels. Additionally, the US has been pushing Japan to amend Article 9 >almost since it was written. Now that Japan actually does face a threat from China (for the first time), it may feel it >cannot trust the US completely. Your defense of the US sounds more like "talking points" from the Obama >administration or the military than any reflection of what is happening. "Trust us" seems to mean less and less >when coming from the US these days.

China's current aggressive military and territorial expansion program is most certainly revelant to Japan's actions. In fact, at this time it is the THE MOST SIGNIFICANT factor in US-Japan security relations. You admit this yourself ;"Now that Japan actually does face a threat from China (for the first time)". Where you are mistaken is that until now, Japan did not trust the US butr China's current behavior has only served to increase the level of trust. The more beligerently China behaves the stronger the US-Japan alliance becomes.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

taro67Oct. 30, 2012 - 11:54PM JST Who benefits? For instance, Japanese automakers are taking a beating on their massive investments in China. Meanwhile, US automakers are increasing their investments in China while the US plays word games over the Senkakus.

The Senkaku/Daiyou problem is a conflict between two goverment, not the private businesses. How is the Japanese companies operating inside China related to the island dispute? Does Chinese goverment have a right to destroy any foreign companies operating inside China? What is a purpose of long term investment planning by these foreign companies if Chinese goverment does not give them security? The violent outbursts will eventually backfire on China. With the world economy struggling, damage has already been done. What is clear is that there will be a sharp downturn in business dealings between Japan and China and will include many foreign countries. The Japanese and other foreign companies will start looking at the options and reconsider the risks of business in China and speed up in diversify toward Southeast Asia, India and other parts of the world. The Chinese goverment didn't do nothing to stop it but encouraged it to create major damages to their businesses. The widespread destruction of Japanese businesses and the calls for boycotts are already taking a toll and Japanese in China now feel very insecure.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@myichi_butt exactly, way too convenient when both sides are on the verge of political change. US won't act if china doesnt cross the line and japan cant afford to fight on more than one front if stuff escalates. This might go on a while until someone reasonable on both sides indeed sees that both sides ARE losing out while it lasts and no one is getting anything done. I'm still convinced a sino-japanese alliance would be something out of proportion but the past seems to make that impossible. I once read a great sig on another site : "if you live in the past you're history"

0 ( +0 / -0 )

OssanAmerica Oct. 31, 2012 - 02:05AM JST Yes Japanese auto makers sales have taken a beating. But so have Chinese auto makers because of the decrease in domestic demand.

Huh? Decrease in domestic demand? In China, the total car sales will be around 18 million cars. There is no decrease at all.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The Senkaku/Daiyou problem is a conflict between two goverment, not the private businesses. How is the Japanese companies operating inside China related to the island dispute?

Well, you get the public all bent out of shape over "Made by Japan" and they don't buy Japanese vehicles. Don't you read the news? Meanwhile, US automakers, because they are not tied to the Senkaku issue because the US is doing little to nothing about it, are increasing their presence. China loses nothing, neither does America. Japan is the only loser. Now, if the US comes out more forcefully, like it has done in Egypt, Libya, Iran, and Syria, the Chinese public would likewise avoid American made. You can claim that this does not affect foreign policy but only at the risk of appearing naive.

As for the rest of your comment, it is irrelevant what China might do or should do or what steps Japanese automakers can take to make up for the lost business. The topic is Japan's decision to increase its coastal defense. My opinion is that it is because it cannot trust what America will do in this situation. I noted the situation with automakers to make the point about America's conflicts of interest as regards China.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

taro67 Oct. 31, 2012 - 07:27AM JST Well, you get the public all bent out of shape over "Made by Japan" and they don't buy Japanese vehicles. Don't you read the news? Meanwhile, US automakers, because they are not tied to the Senkaku issue because the US is doing little to nothing about it, are increasing their presence.

U.S. is tied directly with the Senkaku issue. They made the decision. Remember, in 1972, when U.S. returned Okinawa, they also gave administering rights to Japan on the Senkaku/Daioyu Islands. If China has a beef, why don't they take up the island issue with U.S.? Japan is only following the conditions set by U.S. of the agreement. In the end, the bullying tactics by China will eventually backfire from the international community.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If China has a beef, why don't they take up the island issue with U.S.?

Indeed. Why don't they? And why doesn't the US clear up the issue once and for all? Such questions can only be answered in the context of multiple conflicts of interest. Japan is the odd man out, it seems.

An interesting series of events is that, after the asset bubble burst in Japan, the US moved it interests to China and helped build that economy, leaving friend Japan to basically muddle along through 2 decades of economic decline. What makes it more interesting is that the US was actually afraid of the Japanese economic machine (much like it is afraid of China now). In 1985, the US forced Japan to strengthen the Yen in order to accommodate the US export industry (Japan was considering other methods in order to cool off its economy but the US insisted Japan strengthen the Yen). It did nothing for the US but it did create the environment for Japan's asset bubble, the bursting of which removed Japan as an economic threat to the US. Now, some can claim that this was just Japan's bad fortune. Of course, Japan's bad fortune turned out to be good for the US and China.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

taro67 Oct. 31, 2012 - 07:50AM JST In 1985, the US forced Japan to strengthen the Yen in order to accommodate the US export industry (Japan was considering other methods in order to cool off its economy but the US insisted Japan strengthen the Yen). . It did nothing for the US but it did create the environment for Japan's asset bubble, the bursting of which removed Japan as an economic threat to the US.

Well, it didn't happen in 1985, actually this happened a decade later in 1995, The yen was at all time high at 79 yen per dollar. Reason? Well, after five years of negotiation with Japan to voluntary reduce the car export to U.S., and it didn't work. At the time, Japan only had one-dimensional viewpoint of the exports. U.S. eventually got to the boiling point with Japan and there was a substantial pressure from UAW and the big three. The U.S. goverment had to do something drastic politically. At the time, Japan was still exporting over 2.3 million vehicles annually. By making the Yen much much stronger, the Japanese companies were forced to manufacturer some of their models in the U.S. This is why, today there is a political pressure to adjust Chinese Yuan to make their currency much stronger. There is a similarity to the problem that U.S. faced with Japan two decades ago, except half of the deficiet with China is a result of U.S. companies manufacturing inside China.

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sfjp330 Oct. 31, 2012 - 08:10AM JST

The 1985 Plaza Accord was the beginning of the end for Japan. Over the next 5 years, the JPY/USD exchange dropped from ~250 to ~125 and continued to drop for several years after. Trade restrictions made the effort fail as regards to increase trade for the US in Japan which brought on the auto showdown.

This is why, today there is a political pressure to adjust Chinese Yuan to make their currency much stronger. There is a similarity to the problem that U.S. faced with Japan two decades ago, except half of the deficiet with China is a result of U.S. companies manufacturing inside China.

Yes, and China points to the Plaza Accord and its effect on the Japanese economy as reasons it will not drop its controlled peg against the USD. Why would China bring destruction on its economy to save the US? Yet, despite this, US companies in China benefit too much from the advantages of manufacturing there (ex., Apple and Foxconn) for US foreign policy to screw things up. 1.3 billion potential Chinese consumers adds weight to US commercial interests and US foreign policy is heavily influenced by those interests...always has been.

The entire mess is a nightmare and will not end well, especially for Japan.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

So it's the big brother US trying to protect its own interest by dictating what Japan and China should do. Instead of fighting why don't Japan and China develope even more closer ties with each other whether in trades or cultures, and control their own destinies without outside influence.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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