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Noodle restaurant wins Michelin star as Tokyo keeps gourmet crown

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Here is a Fuji TV segment featuring the ramen restaurant Tsuta (蔦): <www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfwjayquOGw>

It is located in Tokyo's Sugamo district.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The last time I saw Michelin in the news the headline was something about a three star Michelin restaurant that didn't allow foreigners.

That was also the last time I cared about their guide.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Interesting . . . the ramen place is actually named "Japanese Soba Noodles 蔦"

2 ( +4 / -2 )

The last time I saw Michelin in the news the headline was something about a three star Michelin restaurant that didn't allow foreigners

no, that is not totally true. the man, a taiwanese food critic (i think), tried to book a seat at SJ or another three star sushi restaurant, but the staff wouldn't accept the reservation unless a japanese credit card was used, or if someone could vouch for him in japan. so many people book and don't show up at those tiny 3-star sushi restaurants not realizing that empty seats means tons of lost money for those guys. one empty seat costs the restaurant about 20-30,000 yen.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Michelin is like the Beaujolais nouveau of food guides; they appeal to back patters because no one else takes it seriously.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

one empty seat costs the restaurant about 20-30,000 yen.

Well, not exactly. An empty seat results in 20-30,000 yen less sales, but it doesn't actually cost them that much. The cost is the cost of the rice, fish, wages and overhead. For that one seat, I'd be surprised if that even came near 10,000 yen.

But, I agree that cancellations screw the business. I just don't agree with the discrimination against foreigners that they've applied - the should come up with a blanket rule for everyone.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

. I just don't agree with the discrimination against foreigners that they've applied - the should come up with a blanket rule for everyone.

How do they discriminate against foreigners? (I don't patronize those uppity restaurants.)

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

How do they discriminate against foreigners? (I don't patronize those uppity restaurants.)

This restaurant set a rule that foreigners must use a concierge service or a hotel front desk to book reservations at their restaurant, while Japanese people are able to book directly.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

There's a wonderful little restaurant in my town. It serves mostly Chinese food that is cooked by a Chinese chef, and is one of those tiny places with five tables and a warm atmosphere. It will never get a Michelin star because it's in the middle of nowhere and probably doesn't adhere to hygiene or safety standards! It does however serve some of the most delicious Chinese food I've had - and I've been to China - and most of the Chinese students I teach swear by it - which is enough endorsement in itself.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

There are thousands of brilliant restaurants in the country. Would have to be a fool to tell them about your favorites.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

i don't think restaurants discriminated foreigners, travel plan changed often in last minute. it there is limited seating, it is fair to guarantee with credit card. it is better to think twice before booking.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

i don't think restaurants discriminated foreigners, travel plan changed often in last minute

No, that's exactly what they do. And the rule is to treat anyone with a foreign-sounding name--including a permanent resident of three decades, fluent in Japanese--that way.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Why would someone disagree with me. No way would I recommend my favorite restaurants to Michelin. The prices would go up, and I would never be able to get in again. Some things should be kept secret.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Back on topic please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Would love to try this ramen place, but even earlier this year they apparently had lines of 40 people or so. Now it will be ridiculous (full of people like me, no doubt). Reviews say that even for tonkotsu/miso ramen lovers, this one is delicious (it is a simple soy soup base).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

There is such a high standard of quality at restaurants in Japan, why bother with Michelin-starred places? I'm sure Sukiyabashi Jiro does great sushi (although I'm sure I will never try it), but there are many other places which will welcome your business and which you can reserve on the same day in Tsukiji, and are absolutely excellent - plus they won't break the bank, either. Go where there's competition and you will rarely be disappointed here.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I agree with the others...no point even trying to go because of the crowds it will have. At least with a regular type restaurant you could make a reservation but I don't really feel like queuing up for hours outside.

Interesting to see a certain sushi place is no longer listed btw.

Also, why buy the full guide when the list is available free online & Google is your friend :) http://www.scribd.com/doc/291800858/Michelin-Guide-Tokyo-2016-Full-List

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm with Hollis on this one. I knew a Chinese restaurant like that near D.C. It was in a strip mall in a scary neighborhood. The first time I walked in there was standing water in the "dining" area, and I had my doubts whether they could even pass a health inspection. But, OMG the food was amazing! The shrimp fried rice had huge prawns with barely enough rice to hold them together.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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