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Number of female university teachers in Japan at record high

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If it's only for the show but not for actual purpose of teaching then it's useless. "Token" teachers just to fill up the quota. Will Japan actually apply any change honne or is everything there gonna be tatemae forever.

-11 ( +7 / -18 )

Well, it only took a few dacades, but the numbers are finally starting to change. Better late than never.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Notice they didn’t say tenured, or full time. These are mostly part time positions for the university positions.

5 ( +12 / -7 )

I hope the increased number of female college teachers will not result in lower academic standards in Japanese universities.

-12 ( +7 / -19 )

Notice they didn’t say tenured, or full time. These are mostly part time positions for the university positions.

My thoughts exacly. Just something to report for human resources.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

I got to go back to University then!

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

If they have the relevant qualifications then more power to em.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Do they get paid the same as male colleagues?

2 ( +5 / -3 )

One shouldn’t care if they are female or male, it should be if they are a good teacher or not. These artificial quotas do little to improve education.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

obladiToday  07:15 am JST

Well, it only took a few dacades, but the numbers are finally starting to change. Better late than never.

Yes, and the funniest thing is that the Japanese population is aging so there won't be a need for so many teachers in the future.

With less demand and a higher ratio of teachers mean lower wages and unemployment.

But I'm happy we finally got there.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

The only question is, if they in majority teach or study the subjects that can later be transformed into products or services which have outstanding innovations, quality and price so that they are sold everywhere, for example STEM. If those women are active only in fields that don’t have any other use than only bringing more women into universities and in fields that no one really needs, like thousands of classical music teachers, or for gender studies, international relationship research and such similar nothings, then the demerits are soon becoming dramatically obvious. It simply leads to less men in universities, with the consequences all you little new Einsteins can surely conclude by yourself.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Well, it’s about time. Welcome to what the rest of the world has been doing for decades now!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I think the key word here is "teachers" and "in teaching positions". Notice it doesn't say "professors"? Could be a big difference.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Notice they didn’t say tenured, or full time. These are mostly part time positions for the university positions.

I'm not sure how accurate this is. Its true that an increasing share of "teaching positions" at universities are being filled by part time hijokin or limited term contract people. But I think that affects males and females alike - pretty much anyone entering academia in Japan these days is screwed - and I'm not sure how much the increase in female numbers is attributable mainly to more women getting those insecure positions.

Female representation among tenured faculty seems to be going up, though it varies a lot across universities and individual faculties within the same university. Some are seriously trying to redress the gender imbalance, others are definitely not.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I hope the increased number of female college teachers will not result in lower academic standards in Japanese universities

Too late:

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2017/08/31/editorials/crisis-japans-scientific-research-output/

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Being hired as a female full time academic is only the beginning. Japanese colleges and universities are still ruled by men, many of of whom are conservative chauvinists. For female academics there is most of often the battle of being taken seriously as scholars and promoted from lecturer to associate professor to full professor. In one way or another especially bight women are to often kept down--a problem they share with non-Japanese professors.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), women employed in Japan earn an average of 22.5% less than men.

this is why I asked this question.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

While not a university, but over half of the teachers at the translator/interpreter vocational school I attended in Osaka were women. Never really gave that a second though but I suppose that was pretty progressive.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hope the increased number of female college teachers will not result in lower academic standards in Japanese universities.

Rather than celebrating the increase in women in such roles, you display the kind of prejudice that kept women out of the profession for so long.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There is no mention of how many of the record 50,975 women in teaching positions at public and private universities are part-time workers. I wager it is in the neighbourhood of 75%.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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