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Number of foreign visitors to Japan in January-April tops 10 million

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Nah, in my hometown with less than a million inhabitants we have 18 million visitors this year..

But drastic measurements are coming soon :)

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Unbelievable news! Tourism is one of major booms in Abenomics . Year 2020, the year of Tokyo Olympic, tourist target should be raised now to 50 Million.

Furthermore, with many new World Heritage Sights being awarded, around Japan and islands,the tourist boom could rise much further within 10 years, perhaps 100 million a year.

-16 ( +4 / -20 )

glad to hear, after the tsunami at fukushima, there was hardly any tourist

for a while.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Unbelievable news! Tourism is one of major booms in Abenomics . Year 2020, the year of Tokyo Olympic, tourist target should be raised now to 50 Million.

This has less to do with Abenomics than these tourists coming from countries that have more disposable income available and want to travel.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

Before, since the end of the war, tourists from abroad were mostly Americans and other westerners. For them, Japan was exotic.  English books about Japan were written and published in great number by westerners at that time.  But today they come mostly from other asian countries. I wonder why other asians who share the similar culture with us get interested in Japan.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

Good for Japan.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Good for Japan economy, but annoying.

Glad I live in the inaka and am unaffected. Took a weekend trip to Kyoto last year. It was so packed it just wasn't fun to do anything toursity. Push it along we have to take our picture. Majestic as heck view, serene vista, contemplative atmosphere, too bad! Movie it along so everyone can take their selfie.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Probably asian tourists to Japan are increasing as a result they became richer. Globalism is helping them. Many Japanese companies  moved their factories to other asian countries seeking cheap labor while domestic Japanese businesses received serious damages.  Local cities of Japan are miserable. Former main streets are today "a shutter street."  Globalism brought a good result and a bad result.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

Yeah, not sure if its happy news. Good to get some cash flowing in but as stepoutsidethebox mentioned it's getting too friggin crowded.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Certainly have noticed this. Had business trips to Kyushu and then Kyoto last week and in both places the crowds were excessive. Hakata station is usually busy but jeeze!! It was swamped.

I am not a fan of crowds, but it is a good thing for Japan, not only economically.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

I am happy to see more and more foreigners coming to Japan knowing that companies and local shops get money from that. I just don't know if it's good for this Abenomics system if foreigners buy in duty free shops or buy stuffs using tax-exemption showing the passport (!?). So, those companies and shops pay less annual taxes from that. With exception of restaurants, small food stores, etc...Private businesses get the money and it's good but what about taxes going to the country? It's not clear to me this Abenomics is effective with it or not. Can someone explain me?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"I wonder why other asians who share the similar culture with us get interested in Japan."

Because it's a better organized, safer, cleaner, culturally deeper and get bang-for-your-money place than where they come from.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Ganbare - Abe & his nomics has little to do with this.

Over 70% are only a 1 - 3 hour flight away. Similarly it's no surprise that most tourists, to say France, come from nearby countries.

Visa restrictions have been lifted and "forced" group travel replaced largely by (semi) independent travellers.

Most of these tourists are now "cashed up" and see Japan as a bargain place esp for higher quality goods.

The whole accomodation world in Japan has turned on it's head the past decade or so. The norm of restrictive, non-flexible, expensive hotels only, has given way to thousands of budget hotels, B&B, Airb&b, hostels etc. Also rates are up for offer through booking brokers, which see room prices changing daily. Bargains can be had.

And of course Japan has a lot to offer and now many of these tourists are finally understanding there is much much more to experience than Tokyo or Kyoto.

The down side of this is the overcrowding of places to the almost unbearable limit. This is happening around the world - witness Venice - and is creating logistic, safety and comfort nightmares.

There is a limit to how many tourists can be absorbed, but outside of regulations (laws) I can't see any other long term way to preserve the history & beauty of some areas.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Depends on how you look at it. There are pros and cons, cause and effect to all actions. As long as foreigners come and don't trash the place, respect the culture, then I think it's a good thing, but over here in Fukuoka there are sadly reports of some foreigners littering and oftentimes being difficult rude or obnoxious and that's not a good thing, but other than that it is great to see a boom in the economy and people gaining interest in Japanese culture.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

The more easy Japan makes travel for non-speakers/readers of Japanese, and the more they dispel the false assumption that Japan is prohibitively expensive, this should skyrocket. Unprecedented technology and access to information are the keys.

Plenty of people are curious about Japan, and it's not just the anime and video games crowd. And as more people learn how easy it is to travel abroad, many more will come. You can literally book a trip to Japan including flights, ground transportation, and reservations to the most obscure mountain ryokan/onsen from a smartphone, all in English, inside of an hour.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

AND

At least 100 bamboo trees in Kyoto's Arashiyama district have been vandalised by tourists, who apparently engraved their names and initials.

2.PUBLIC TOILETS WHICH WERE ONCE SPOT CLEAN , STINK AND ARE DIRTY, TISSUE ROLES STOLEN DAILY

5 ( +6 / -1 )

As much of a nuisance as a few bad apples may be, a steady increase in foreign tourists is decidedly a net-positive for Japan.

Japan has had negligible economic growth for a generation, inflation has been flat for two decades, interest rates have been skirting zero for the same amount of time, and we all know what's happening to their population.

While the money that tourists leave behind won't cure Japan's ills, it won't hurt either. Moreover, it will organically promote Japan abroad along with Japanese products- foodstuffs, fancy toilet seats, wares, companies, services, all of it- much better than any of the government campaigns to promote 'Cool Japan' by painting ANA wide-body jets to look like Hello Kitty and all the other laughable, ineffective stuff we've seen over the years.

If it means a few knuckleheads come over and carve their names on picnic tables and toss empty beer cans in bicycle baskets, so be it.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I wonder why other asians who share the similar culture with us get interested in Japan.

Here is a survey on reasons to visit Japan by Chinese regions. Sightseeing, cuisines, shopping, natures, as well as culture.

https://www.nippon.com/en/features/h00191/

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This has less to do with Abenomics than these tourists coming from countries that have more disposable income available and want to travel.

An increase of disposable income of other nations has also contributed, but the Japanese Government has made concerted efforts to attract more tourists, including easing visa restrictions, which have been major drivers of this increase in tourist numbers.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hate the number of tourists in Japan. The county can't handle this many people and it ruins the cities and places the hordes of tourists visit. I've got nothing against manageable tourism, but when it's this pervasive, it's absolutely nothing more than a massive grab for cash by the government and some large corporations. It's sad to see every major city losing it's soul to tourism. The very things people are coming to see is being washed away by tourism.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

With all these extra flights and consumption - where does the small issue of carbon targets and impeding runnaway climate change figure in all this?

.... Co2 already at around 410ppm - the last time it was this high is estimated to be 4 million years ago when the sea level was 20 meters higher than its current level.

Priorities???

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I don't mind the tourists, it's good for the economy. I'd say its down to how Japan is perceived abroad, rather than so-called Abe-nomics. I would be happy to see less of the drunken types and gropers who make life a misery for ordinary folk. I guess there's always a downside.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Sorry if tourists bother you, but I enjoy taking my holidays in Japan. I have friends to meet, a girlfriend to spend time with and a chance to soak up the culture and enjoy myself for a few weeks.

I don't moan about tourists cluttering up the Highlands, trampling all over Glencoe, etc... I like to see tourists... means my country is popular with visitors.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

stepoutsidetheboxToday 08:06 am JST

Good for Japan economy, but annoying.

Glad I live in the inaka and am unaffected. Took a weekend trip to Kyoto last year. It was so packed it just wasn't fun to do anything toursity.

Was in Kyoto in June 2017 in the middle of the week - it was great low in tourist numbers in and out of the major tourist destinations no problems - train station was packed that was the only location for crowds encountered.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sometimes in Shinjuku I can walk from the Alta building to Isetan and hear nothing but Chinese, Korean, English and other European languages, Thai, Vietnamese, etc. I like helping lost tourists, and I admire their spirit of adventure coming here without an guide and trying to do everything by themselves. Shinjuku is now the number 1 tourist destination in Tokyo.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Nah, in my hometown with less than a million inhabitants we have 18 million visitors this year..

Yes, well, not every city wants to become a glorified Disneyland like Venice. Nice to leave some room for the residents.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Regarldess of what country

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I wonder why other asians who share the similar culture with us get interested in Japan.

For the same reason that in Europe, most of the visitors are from other European countries. Japan is still a distinct and interesting location, and the closer you are, the easier it is to visit.

I hate the number of tourists in Japan. The county can't handle this many people and it ruins the cities and places the hordes of tourists visit. I've got nothing against manageable tourism, but when it's this pervasive

Except in a few locations, there are very few tourists. Even in Kyoto, there are lots of temples/shrines free of tourists. The tourist locations just need to adapt to the increased volume and recognise that tourism is now a major export for Japan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

We visited in May and had the most wonderful holiday!

We would love to visit again.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I wonder why other asians who share the similar culture with us get interested in Japan.

Because otaku culture like anime, manga, videogames, cosplaying, maid cafes, “idol” culture, AV actresses etc etc.

If otaku culture did not take off then Japan will just be another South Korea...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Ganbare Japan!

Unbelievable news! Tourism is one of major booms in Abenomics .

That is because Japan is now a low cost country thanks to its stagnant wages.

Korea's median wage is 50% higher than Japan for sometime, and Beijing and Shanghai area's median wage is expected to surpass Japan's in 5 years.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Korea's median wage is 50% higher than Japan for sometime,

Wikipedia suggests differently (may be mean not median, but...). Japan wages appear to be 25% above those of South Korea.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In my opinion, it really is time to place some sort of limits. Certain businesses benefit financially, but the ever-growing crowds are just going to antagonize people living here. And I don't think the average Joe benefits in anyway. In Hong Kong, the surge in tourists from the mainland really tested the locals, with overcrowding on the public transport, preferential treatment over locals in some stores (unbelievably!!!) and some very unsavoury public behaviour. The only people to benefit were hotels, drugstores and gold chains. When tourist numbers were capped due to local discontent, business for gold chains suddenly plummeted, and not one local felt any sympathy for those greedy businesses.

It's all very well for governments to increase the number of inbound tourists - but they don't give one thought about whether this benefits the average local. Italy certainly doesn't think much of the locals in Venice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tourists to Kyoto, domestic and foreign generate ¥1 trillion of income for the city. When a visit a site like Himeji Castle 25% to 33% of the visitors are foreigners.

Last month we visited Yoshino for the sakura. Isolated and a difficult place to reach, but more than 25% of the visitors were foreigners.

All these tourists are providing incomes for local people and business.

Here in Kobe, Chinese tourists come in waves for the sole purpose of shopping. Rather than sight seeing but nonetheless, they are spending money.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

'Get out of MY Japan' Syndrome seems to be manifesting itself a bit in the comments here.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And with this news, we also find out that "AirBnB" is being pushed out of Japan by new regulations coming into force requiring neighbors explicit approval (amongst other things) before you can continue with your 1/2 yearly taxable venture. Would be interesting to see JT putting an article out about this little gem in the making from our friends in the Diet.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Here in Kobe, Chinese tourists come in waves for the sole purpose of shopping. Rather than sight seeing but nonetheless, they are spending money.

lol why are they comming to Japan just to buy stuff made in China...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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