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Only 20% of public high schools in Japan have foreign student quotas

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"A person who has only graduated junior high school is unlikely to be able to find a full-time job" in Japan, said Miho Yoshida

He's wrong, it really depends on Job. There are always opening in factory jobs and drivers for high school students.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2024/01/20/japan/society/tokyo-buses-foreign-drivers/

-14 ( +5 / -19 )

The higher the education the higher the chance you find a good job well remunerated. Many jobs, mostly manual jobs, are accessible to non graduated students. The issue is that those persons are at a higher risk for low paid jobs throughout their life, especially with the language difficulties

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Good. Why should schools have "quotas" for any reason?

17 ( +21 / -4 )

Only few school can accommodate foreign kids but their parents, which foreigners need to pay income tax and residence tax 100%.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

No need for double standards. Remove the quotas.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

I had to remove my son from the Japanese school system because of bullying by both teachers and students from grade 1 until grade 5 which included teachers shouting at my child in the hallways and students constantly throwing my child's shoes in the garbage.

Truly, I wanted my child to grow up and finish school in Japan, however, this year after my child lived overseas for 3 years separately while I worked to support us until I could figure out a plan made the move out of Japan.

The talks, the principal calling me mama after repeatedly asking him not to call me that and the list goes on. My child is happy now and we are once again living under the same roof, however, very sadly we are not living in Japan the country I absolutely loved calling home and miss with all my heart.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

Only 20% of public high schools in Japan have foreign student quotas

So, this means that these 20% are not required to sit for entrance exams like their Japanese counterparts? Talk about discrimination.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

They cite difficulties in offering Japanese lessons for students with different levels of proficiency and finding interpreters for different kinds of foreign languages as reasons.

Supplying interpreters for foreign students? Huh? Better yet have JSL classes for them, immersion is one of, if not the, fastest way to learn a language!

12 ( +13 / -1 )

I heard an oldish Japanese person talking about how it was going to be difficult to tell who was ‘pure’ Japanese in the future when more foreigners came here for work. Just the casual use of the word ‘pure’ hints at the racism simmering just under the surface in this polite country.

-12 ( +10 / -22 )

For all sorts of reasons. For one, it can ensure foreign students are coming in at all.

No it doesnt. It's meaningless if there are no foreigners in the district that fit the quota!

I suppose you expect schools to go scouting for foreigners to fill their quotas?

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Why remove them?

So do you support double standards? If the foreigners can get it without an exam, but the Japanese students cant, what do you call that?

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

As mentioned above, JSL classes are the best way to go. Growing up in Canada, we had ESL immersion programs at every level - and that was the 70s!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

They cite difficulties in offering Japanese lessons for students with different levels of proficiency and finding interpreters for different kinds of foreign languages as reasons.

If they student cant speak, write, or read Japanese, the student should not be in Japanese High school. He should be in a Japanese language school.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

They cite difficulties in offering Japanese lessons for students with different levels of proficiency and finding interpreters for different kinds of foreign languages as reasons.

What difficulties are those?

Could it be the thinking of the one-size-fits-all education offered to large groups that is the problem?

Teacher talks and the children listen.

That is Japan’s education style

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Japanese schools are only teaching to be obedient and wipe the shoes of your senpai.

On the contrary, it is a gift to not pollute the brain of students with this brain-washing program...

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

They would need to show their grades and performance from their school in their home country,

Not good enough, they have to pass the same entrance exams, for it to be fair!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan is very good at teaching math and science. But this country isn't very good at teaching language. English (to Japanese people) or Japanese (to foreigners).

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If you want foreign workers, as Japan does, you have to make provisions to teach their kids.

The technical term for this is "give and take".

Japanese kids raised overseas may struggle with language too and need special provisions.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

In most Western countries it is common for any school to accept foreign students and have classes to help them transition into a new language. Why are Japanese schools always "concerned" with anything remotely new to them? The Japanese education system really needs to step up its game.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If they student cant speak, write, or read Japanese, the student should not be in Japanese High school. He should be in a Japanese language school.

So, if the reverse were to happen, say a Japanese student, or a student from another country were enrolled by the parents to just moved to Canada, the US, or another English speaking country who could not speak or read English. Are you going to turn that person away? If so, then I guess my mom would have fit into that category too, and that's discrimination, which is illegal. No. Immersion classes are the way to go with this. It turns out that she worked very hard, but was able to do well. You can also make a case for my oldest daughter, so also fitted into the same category as my mom. She's currently on the honor roll in her school and loves her school.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

No question Japanese education system is the one of the best in world and children raises with discipline.

Bullying is not only in Japan, everywhere.

At least Japan schools safe from drugs.

Due to schooling we moved out of Japan

to west.But really missing Japan.

.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

So, if the reverse were to happen, say a Japanese student, or a student from another country were enrolled by the parents to just moved to Canada, the US, or another English speaking country who could not speak or read English. Are you going to turn that person away? If so, then I guess my mom would have fit into that category too, and that's discrimination, which is illegal. No. Immersion classes are the way to go with this. It turns out that she worked very hard, but was able to do well. You can also make a case for my oldest daughter, so also fitted into the same category as my mom. She's currently on the honor roll in her school and loves her school.

Then you had better even the playing field here and insist that ALL the students have to take entrance exams to get into HS in Canada, US or some other "English" speaking country.

You are comparing apples and oranges here, since Japanese HS has an entrance exam the foreign student should be taking the same exam, for all things to be considered equal!

You can not "reverse" it as the requirements are totally different, and HS is pretty much "expected" in the US and English speaking countries, in Japan it is NOT a part of compulsory education, so you honestly can not make a comparison.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Parents are expected to look into these things before moving in to a foreign country and should factor it when they make their decision to take their kids with them

If it doesn't fit your principles, don't move

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

For all sorts of reasons. For one, it can ensure foreign students are coming in at all.

And you think this is a good thing? Not for the school, and not for the students whose teacher has to spend more time with the non Japanese kids.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

The reason for the excuses the guy makes as to why they can't ensure proper education for foreign students is just that -- excuses. Well, that and the extreme inability for Japan to adapt when it comes to teaching practices (and change in general in almost any facet of life).

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Everything you wanted to know and more about foreign students' admission to Japanese high schools is here: https://www.mext.go.jp/a_menu/shotou/kaikaku/sikaku/1311012.htm

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Regarding post-compulsory school attendance, recent data regarding the graduation rate for Japanese students who enroll in HS:

2021年3月卒業の場合において計算すると、全日制高校の卒業率は約94.3%

For the US, where compulsory education ends at age 16 or 18 depending on the state: The average state graduation rate across 49 U.S. states and Washington, D.C. (recent data was not available for Oklahoma) was 79% for the 2021-2022 academic year

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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