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Only 30% of Fukushima residents happy with disaster recovery progress

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I'll bet the 30% work for TEPCO!

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Imagine if the money squandered on the five ringed circus was spent on these people.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

 ...they are still not allowed to return to their hometowns... 

So how come the government locks down for a radiation scare but not for a virus scare, (with the excuse that the constitution bars it from doing so)?

Sometimes, Japan is totally, totally incomprehensible.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

When I read these kind of articles it makes me shake my head. What do these people think, that the radiation will just magically disappear. This was a major nuclear event, and there is nothing the government can do about the radiation.

Also, many of these small communities were on there way to extinction before the earthquake and tsunami, but foolishly the government promised to spend billions if not trillions of yen to rebuild them, only to see people not moving back, jobs not returning, and people complaining about how things are not getting better.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Nearly 10 years after the 2011 earthquake-tsunami and nuclear disasters in northeastern Japan, only 30 percent of Fukushima Prefecture residents say reconstruction has been sufficient, according to a Kyodo News survey.

This should be a major target of the public funds instead of the money pit of the Olympics.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Government takes money but rarely gives.

What do the people in Fukushima expect?

Better to forget Fukushima and move out...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Sometimes, Japan is totally, totally incomprehensible

just sometime? To me rather often incomprehensible, and looks like bushido is still very much alive and thriving in corporate and political clans.

When I worked in HK for a Japanese corporate, my manager often gave us bushido style speeches, and espouse the virtue of a warrior in completing projects on time. It was surreal, there was us, and then there was nobody (everyone else who didn't matter), it just rolled off his tongue like it was the Heian era.

I'm guessing, despite the power of their vote, the people of Fukushima are mostly people who don't matter.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

And 100% of the world has been unsatisfied.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Can't blame 'em!!

So far not too much has been achieved, except for the (bad) news from that area getting less!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Fukushima is a large prefecture and much of it didn't get radiation. The 30km and 20km areas and special areas.

I have always said the 20 km exclusion zone should have remained in place, at least until the end of the nuclear disaster in many decades times. All the property owners compensated by TEPCO for their loss.

TEPCO was hoping this year to start the removal of the molten fuel from the No2 reactor but recently have discovered the radiation levels on the reactor plug which is normally removed to replace the fuel has very high and dangerous levels of radiation. 10 Sieverts per hour. That would kill a person within one hour. TEPCO will now have to delay the removal of the molten fuel while it tries to discover an answer to the problem. The same with No3 reactor.

It could be the molten fuel can not be removed.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Fukushima residents should be relocated in Hokkaido. Their rural experience would be extremely beneficial to underpopulated Hokkaido.

Plutonium/Uranium has a half life of 1000 years, Strontium/Cesium about 37 years. Another earthquake could happen any minute

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Goodlucktoyou

Fukushima residents should be relocated in Hokkaido. Their rural experience would be extremely beneficial to underpopulated Hokkaido.

Unrealistic and impossible proposal to move 2million people, all the business and farming to Hokkaido when the greater area is not contaminated. Odd to think that all of Fukushima would be contaminated but not else where.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I'm with Factchecker. The fact that the misery of the people of Fukushima was used as emotional blackmail to get the ink signed on this concrete-and-Dentsu griftfest (Which was financially ruinous even then for all but the insiders) is a disgraceful shame on the LDP hucksters.

Why has it taken so long to reconstruct the disaster zone? Because all the money's been squandered on this bread-and-circuses shambles.

Shame on those with their snouts in the trough.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I feel sorry for these people, but they should get a big payout and literally move on with their lives somewhere else. This is definitely a cautionary tale for other prefectures that are considering hosting nuclear power plants or waste.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Unrealistic and impossible proposal to move 2million people, all the business and farming to Hokkaido when the greater area is not contaminated. Odd to think that all of Fukushima would be contaminated but not else where.

Parts of Ibaraki, Saitama, Tokyo, Niigata, Iwate, Yamagata are contaminated. How I know? Apart from Yamagata, I have been there on many occasions to test with my Geiger Counter. I have almost 100,000 views on my Fukushima Radiation related blog. How about you? You think raising children in Tokyo, 2.5-3x norm, or Fukushima 4.5-6.5x norm is great for loving parents?

i suggest yo purchase a reputable Geiger Counter online and check for yourself. I think I only paid ¥120000, but I sleep well at night.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

It is not only the Olympics that are to blame. The government collected a new reconstruction tax after the disaster, but the money was used for all kinds of other things—from roads in Okinawa to refitting the factory ship for the whalers.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Forget about them. Their plight is regrettable.

Let's focus on the important task of diverting more public money to Dentsu via Olympic schemes.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Both arguments mostly discussed here make sense. Help the sensible people from Fukushima to relocate and start over. Hokkaido and Kyushu are comparable economic environments for them.

Zishi, sorry, you are way off here, the contaminated area is far bigger than even Fukushima prefecture.

And if everyone is so confident why do I still witness grossery stores changing Fukushima labels ( I have a picture of it) and is Fukushima rice called “ recovery rice “ ?

the accident, not incident, is regrettable but nobody is helped by denying simple truths. The only real and realistic solution is for everyone under 70 to move away. I can see the arguments for the elder to stay and they should get all comfort.

All other ages, if they are of medium intelligence and care about their families and lives must move out.

with full support from government and citizens like me, like us, in full solidarity. But eating contaminated product or telling fairy tales is not solidarity it is stupidity

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Many of these places were already on a fast decline to depopulation. The disaster just speeded up the inevitable.

Don’t waste money just rebuilding facilities that will not be used. Spend the money wisely on places with a viable population where the sea isn’t an ever present danger.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Radiation moves around and becomes concentrated in living organisms

Failure to control the escaped material means more radioactivity in the environment, not less...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

robert maes

Zishi, sorry, you are way off here, the contaminated area is far bigger than even Fukushima prefecture.

I think you probably mean me. But not if you check the radiation maps maintained by citizen groups.

This one is good.

https://jciv.iidj.net/map/

You can also visit the SAFECAST site, another good one.

https://safecast.org

Any rice which is sold to food chain restaurants and food processing plants is "industrialised rice" requiring no label of origin. Fish isn't labelled from where it's caught but where it's landed. Same in all countries. The allowable levels of radiation allowed in produce and water were greatly reduced to one tenth of the international standards. Anyway, lower than Europe and America.

Since 2011 I don't think we have brought any farm produce from Fukushima but mostly because we live in Hyogo and try to buy local produce. I understand people's concerns about produce from there. There is local government testing. Believe or not? But there are also citizen groups, like young mothers who set up their own testing lab. All have websites.

I have always maintained the exclusion zones should have remained in place until the nuclear disaster is over. That is looking like never.

Derek Grebe

Why has it taken so long to reconstruct the disaster zone? Because all the money's been squandered on this bread-and-circuses shambles.

To date the central government has spent more than ¥25 trillion on the Tohoku Reconstruction and another ¥25 trillion on the nuclear disaster.

Most of the reconstruction of Miyagi and Iwate and Fukushima outside of the exclusion is done. Including many kilometers of ugly sea walls. Local governments are trying to provide more public housing but they have problems trying to buy the land especially on higher ground.

I am in no way defending the central and local governments but plain wrong to say nothing was done. You can see for yourself using Google Maps and Google Street.

Inside the exclusion zones there has been less reconstruction and mostly decontamination works. There are more than one million tons of contaminated soil in plastic bags at various locations. In some towns there have been some reconstruction like new local authority building and new housing. I am not sure why any former residents would want to return. Most places have areas with levels of radiation not permitted. They won't be returned to be like the former communities.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Goodlucktoyou

Parts of Ibaraki, Saitama, Tokyo, Niigata, Iwate, Yamagata are contaminated. How I know? Apart from Yamagata, I have been there on many occasions to test with my Geiger Counter. I have almost 100,000 views on my Fukushima Radiation related blog. How about you? You think raising children in Tokyo, 2.5-3x norm, or Fukushima 4.5-6.5x norm is great for loving parents?

You have made many posts stating the same but without providing any real data. This is the first time you state you have a "Fukushima Radiation Blog". Please provide the URL so we can all visit, and even increase the numbers of your views. A search on Google does not bring it up? I would like to read your blog.

I suggest yo purchase a reputable Geiger Counter online and check for yourself. I think I only paid ¥120000, but I sleep well at night.

I believe you have said you live in Kyoto. No radiation problem there. I live in Hyogo and no problem here too unless you include the Kobe Rokko mountains which have high levels of radium.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Something similar happened in Kobe after the 1994 Great Hanshin Earthquake when much of the city was destroyed. The city fathers wanted to use the reconstruction to make a better city and make some rezoning of residential areas. People from those areas who had lost their homes to the earthquake wanted to return rather than move to a new area.

When we arrived in 2002, there where still people living under blue plastics in public parks. In the end they had to move out and move on.

I never lived in Kobe before the earthquake but did live there for 16 years until the end of 2018. A very nice city to live in.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Zichi:

Why has it taken so long to reconstruct the disaster zone? Because all the money's been squandered on this bread-and-circuses shambles.

To date the central government has spent more than ¥25 trillion on the Tohoku Reconstruction and another ¥25 trillion on the nuclear disaster.

Correction: The central government has disbursed that huge sum, but where did it go? What proportion of it went to the people who needed the help, and what proportion went to Onion-like, yak-controlled shell companies, paying daily rates to of 10,000 yen to the people actually doing the clean-up and pocketing the rest? How much went to actually rebuilding homes and infrastructure, and how much went to inflated Dentsu contracts and concrete producers charging premium rates on no-bid contracts?

The grift involved in this tragedy is a national scandal.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Derek Grebe

The money spent on the Tohoku reconstruction, ¥25 trillion is a different sum than that spent on the Nuclear Disaster site, and what happened within the 30km contaminated zones.

The Tohoku disaster area was Fukushima, Miyagi and Iwate.

Roads were constructed, bridges built in the places destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami. Sea walls constructed. Schools built. Debris removed. New housing for those left homeless but more is needed.

There is a government website for the reconstruction work.

The reconstruction work was carried out by the top building companies. My complaint would be that they didn't employ enough local workers. Instead too many workers from other prefectures were used.

The government money for the nuclear disaster site is paid to TEPCO. The Nuclear Liability Laws limits the power company responsibility to ¥120 billion.

I have posted many comments on how the temporary workers at the nuclear site are employed. I have always stated they should be employed by a government agency working in Fukushima and taking care of their working conditions, health checks, healthcare and issued with a license to work on the site until they reach their radiation exposure limit. Instead many of the 4,000 daily workers are employed via several layers of contractors and sub contractors. And yes many are not being paid what they should.

The larger amounts of the ¥25 trillion have been spent on the plant and wages for temporary workers is only a small part. Many of them were former Nuclear Gypsies who worked at the nuclear power plants. About 80,000 of them.

¥30 billion was spent on building the ice wall around the reactor buildings to slow or prevent underground water reaching the reactor basements and adding to the total of contaminated water which was several hundred tons per day. The work was completed by Hitachi and Toshiba nuclear divisions.

There have been at least one major media report on the temporary nuclear workers.

I am no supporter of TEPCO and from 2011 posted numerous comments on them and the nuclear disaster.

But I do my best to try and find facts than conspiracy and heresy.

In your comment you mix up the two situation of the reconstruction from the earthquake and tsunami. And TEPCO dealing with its own nuclear disaster and what's happening in the exclusion zones.

¥15 billion was spent on decontamination within the exclusion zones producing more than 1 million of soil. I thought that it was wasted because unless the people wanted to return there was no point.

About 160,000 people were evacuated from the exclusion zone many eventually living in temporary accommodations rent free. they all received monthly support payments of around ¥100,000 each. About 30,000 left the prefecture and never to return. About 11,000 are still in temporary accommodations which was purpose to end Spring 2020. Many have refused new accommodations believing they can return to their former communities. I don't know if those people are still getting monthly support.

The cost of those monthly supports comes to about ¥6 trillion.

I think you should provide links to the stories and facts that you state in your comments. I would like to read them.

The final costs of the nuclear disaster site will exceed ¥50 trillion.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The corium is still in the ground and being impacted by groundwater that increases every time there is precipitation.

There is no technical way to effectively remove the spent fuel as the radioactive bombardment ‘kills’ anything and anyone in its way within a short time.

The funds directed at containing this particular disaster are without limit...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The corium is still in the ground and being impacted by groundwater that increases every time there is precipitation.

The corium is inside the vessel containers, has shown in photo's and videos, unless you have some other evidence we haven't seen. The containers have cracks which leak the cooling water into the basements which is the water which ends up in those storage tanks.

The ice wall reduced but not completely stop the ground water, I think from 700 tons per day to 100 tons per day.

You are correct that the funds for the nuclear disaster are without limit. In the beginning estimated at ¥5 trillion. Currently, ¥25 trillion. Economic groups but the end figure at ¥80 trillion. Not including the costs of the long term storage of nuclear waste.

If the molten fuel can not be removed likely the costs will increase.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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