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Pacific bluefin tuna group puts off new moves to save fish

16 Comments
By ELAINE KURTENBACH

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16 Comments
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Eat now, pay later :(

2 ( +3 / -1 )

But bluefin tuna have been around for millions of years. I'm sure mankind's puny efforts won't do anything to affect natural variations in population.

Keep on fishing!

And burning them fossil fuels ; )

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I'm not a big fan of tuna, but it seems they need a friend to avoid being fished out of existence.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Most of the fish caught are juveniles that have not had a chance to reproduce. The species could recover relatively quickly, however, since they are highly productive, spawning millions of eggs a year.

In principle. but given much of their prey is also being fished out may not be so straightforward.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I would like to know why agreement was not reached actually. What were the sticking points? Japan's "culture"?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Doesnt help when they (Japanese) lost 10,000 bluefin during a typhoon this year either.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I would like to know why agreement was not reached actually. What were the sticking points? Japan's "culture"?

More likely just the greed that drives capitalism.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@warispeace

More likely just the greed that drives capitalism.

Waiting for the greed is good, free market uber alles folks to chime in saying it's all government's fault. Just leave the market alone.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I would guess the market prices will skyrocket before the tuna will perish. Farmed tuna is the vogue nowadays.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There will need to be a fishing moratorium so the species can recover. Biology doesn't care about your cashola life

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Most of the fish caught are juveniles that have not had a chance to reproduce. The species could recover relatively quickly, however, since they are highly productive, spawning millions of eggs a year.

Does the term 'population crash' mean anything to these people? Many marine biologists agree that even if blue fin tuna fishing was stopped altogether today the populations could not recover because the genetic diversity has been destroyed. As stated above, the majority of the fish caught are juveniles that have not yet bred. However, what the article does not state is, due to the extensive fishing and the lure of high quality larger fish they have depleted the population of the genetically larger and stronger fish leaving only the runts to rebuild the population. This is why many scientists believe the population can never recover. And, the saddest thing is, if you speak to a Japanese person about this they are actually proud to boast about how Japan consumes 90% of the world's fresh tuna. The USA takes the cake for consuming the most canned tuna.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I would like to know why agreement was not reached actually. What were the sticking points? Japan's "culture"?

As the article clearly stated 4 of the member countries didn't even come to the meeting, so no vote could be taken. It had nothing to do with Japan's "culture".

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As the article clearly stated 4 of the member countries didn't even come to the meeting, so no vote could be taken. It had nothing to do with Japan's "culture".

Yes. In addition, it was Japan who took the lead in halving the quota for Pacific Bluefin tuna (30kg under) and not to exceed the 2002-04 level of over 30 kg.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Its best, greenpeace turns evil. Create piratuna species in secret lab (hybrid pirahna n blue fin tuna) and let loose to sea. Ensure it has high taste for human meat. One year later, fishermans population dwindling to extinct.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I enjoy my otoro but would stop eating it for two years if everyone else did. Do you think Abe and his friends would do the same?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Too little too late....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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