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Powerful typhoon may approach southwestern Japan on Tuesday

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14 Comments
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Batten down the hatches!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

It's really not that "powerful", just a pain with all the rain!

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Nowhere in Japan is referring to it by the name.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

"Hinnamnor"...? Does not really roll off the tip of the tongue, does it....perhaps we might call it Typhoon #11.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Hinnamnor

Sounds like a name out of a Thor marvel movie.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Redstorm, this storm will skirt the Japanese coast,and make a direct hit on Busan and hit in Russia near Sakhalin island,this is the track of the navy Joint Typhoon Warning Center track

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Nowhere in Japan is referring to it by the name.

All the military bases in Japan are, along with the name being used on Japanese news too.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

YubaruToday  05:18 pm JST

It's really not that "powerful",

Well....it was a category 5 (the highest) super typhoon, and is soon to become a category 4 typhoon again. I'd say that was pretty powerful.

http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/tracker/dynamic/main.html

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Tree hugger

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Why is the JMA and US Navy Joint Typhoon Warning Center,have different track,the navy is tracking the storm at least 100miles from the shores of Japan,toward near Busan

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

YL the trajectory pattern for a super typhoon can change rapidly .

Its not a video game

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Awa,we have the best satellite in the world Goes 17,it even cover some of the Pacific Google Goes 17

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Japanese meteorologists didn't have a custom of calling typhoons by human name historically. After the war, however, the U.S. forces meteorological unit, especially in occupied Okinawa, pejoratively called them by girls' names. Typhoon Sarah, that landed on Miyako Island in 1959 with gusts reaching 288 Kmph comes into mind for that matter.  

Today, an international meteorological organization provides names for all typhoons in the order of their occurrence in the year. But Japan sticks to its century-old custom of calling them by yearly ordinals.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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