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Princess Mako marks 120th anniv. of Japanese immigration to Peru

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Guess it would be bad manners to point out that the original Japanese settlers arrived as poor immigrant labor looking for a better life, and were allowed by the Peruvian government to stay permanently and naturalize as citizens...

13 ( +14 / -1 )

It's also why they went to Brazil en masse, where they were allowed to immigrate and become coffee farmers, given that wages in Brazil and Peru at that time were high than that of Japan... nearly until the war, actually.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Since the late 19th century Japanese started travelling to Peru. The big migration from the early 1900's until the 1960's.

The migrants also went to Hawaii, Mexico and the largest numbers to Brazil. Many of the poor farmers from Kyushu were forced to leave has were left wingers and Communists.

The Japanese in Peru were discriminated against.

In 2017, 1.4 million Japanese were living overseas. The Japanese diaspora account for 3.8 million living in other countries.

More Japanese live overseas or part of the diaspora, than the total numbers of non Japanese living here.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Many's a story about Brazilian Japanese being brought up believing Japan was the mother country & having a sad and rude awakening when they arrived in Japan only to be treated like second class citizens.

There's a decent novel - Brazil Maru by Karen Tei Yamashita about emigration to Brazil, back at the turn of the 20th century.

I imagine there's a few Peruvian novels, concerning similar subject matter, if anyone has any recommendations?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Mako is cute as heck

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

The lovely Mako...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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