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Pufferfish a hit in Japan, despite the risks

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Each to their own and this is definitely not for me. Regardless of the risks or 'tingling' (poisoning) in the mouth, I've tasted it and I don't like it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I have eaten it a lot politely. Boring fish.

Best parts are the fins grilled and placed in hot sake.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Fugu does not taste anything special, I have eaten it may different ways. I think Japanese people like eating to say the fact they are eating it.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Travelling to the gun-toting US, pickpocket filled France, hooligan infested England - abunai! Riding a bicycle carrying two infants without helmets - sheepish grin. The elderly choking to death on mochi - it's our culture. Eating potentially lethal blowfish - oishiiiiii!

2 ( +6 / -4 )

this article is totally overblown. people only become ill if they eat the organs of the blowfish, not the flesh. and the "tingling" sensation is a figment of the writer's imagination. it's an urban legend that is perpetuated to give blowfish more of an appeal. as most people in japan know, it's a totally bland fish when eaten as sashimi.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

A meal that kills, mushrooms, puss, offal left in the sun...you want it because it's traditional, eat up. May I suggest a portion of lead injected under the jaw using a firearm very tasty for those who survive, let's make it a tradition!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I personally just like scooping them up with a hand net at night to take a few pictures of the cute little fugu on the dock before putting them back into the water and watching them swing away. They are pretty funny looking as the huff-n-puff trying to make themselves look big and scary with all those spikes. Kind of reminds me of some Japanese girls when you catch them at their own little silly game and they go all "fugu mukatsuku" on you. :P

1 ( +4 / -3 )

It's bland and essentially tasteless but put some soy sauce on it and, just like everything else, it's "oishii!"

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yes to rickyvie

it is just a fish, it is sold in the supermarkets, nothing special. I don't agree with gogogo, I think it is foreigners who eat it to say they ate it, or who like to say "whoa the jpns eat this crazy thing" but here it is just a fish. Not really dangerous at all when cleaned by licensed guy, who are in all supermarkets? Or at least the distributor's b/c sold everywhere.

And no tingly lips from the meat!! never experienced that, never heard it before!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Depends on how you like your Fugu(Pufferfish).

Mostly people start with sashimi or order a course with covers various dishes(Sashimi, Hot Pot, etc).

Most Fugu caught outside a certain territory is NOT poisonous as they lack a certain algae as food.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Best parts are the fins grilled and placed in hot sake.

That is what I found to be the most disgusting!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Old news????

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"thrill seeking diners sometimes ask to be served the banned interal organs"

They're idiots.

"Occasionally a chef will oblige"

They're idiots too.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I've had it a couple of times before the license restrictions were lifted. Fugu sashimi is delicious, as is the fish karaage style. Fugu testicles are particularly delicious! Kind of like foie gras, only much more delicate and creamy. Won't be having it again though. Especially now that they've relaxed on the licensing.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

WTF, no Fugu-fin Sake?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

This is truly amazing news.

When did all this happen?!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Perhaps one of the more interesting things I ate in Japan, but absolutely not the tastiest....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I've never tried fugu, but as I've read other comments saying it tastes nothing special and is just plain boring, I probably wouldn't even try it ever...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It"S MEJul. 02, 2012 - 05:36PM JST

Most Fugu caught outside a certain territory is NOT poisonous as they lack a certain algae as food.

Wouldn't say most outside a territory, but lab grown fugu is perfectly safe.

Interestingly, tetrodotoxin in fugu is a thousand times more poisonous than plutonium and ten times as toxic as cyanide, so not sure why anyone would ever risk it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I've had fugu twice, the first time as a nabe, the second time was a fugu course including sashimi and grilled. Nothing special, saba or salmon or tuna is more tasty and way cheaper.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

basroil.

Just an example all the Fugu caught of the american coast is free of the poison as the algae don't grow there. The poison comes from the food-chain, plain and simple.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It"S ME

Just an example all the Fugu caught of the american coast is free of the poison as the algae don't grow there. The poison comes from the food-chain, plain and simple

Sorry but the poison doesnt come from algea it comes from the fish eating shell fish. The toxin is in the gastric contents of the shell fish. And most wild pufferfish are poisonous from one degree to another. It farmed fish that are not poisonous as their diet is controlled. Oh and US pufferfish are poisonous, the only ones that arnt are caught mid Atlantic.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It"S MEJul. 02, 2012 - 08:46PM JST

Just an example all the Fugu caught of the american coast is free of the poison as the algae don't grow there. The poison comes from the food-chain, plain and simple.

But that's puffer-fish ;) I haven't seen Japanese that like american fish yet, even if there are some great ones out there.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Cletus.

Funny.

I spoke ot the owner of the local chain fugu restaurant and they only serve north-american caught Fugu as they don't need licensed chefs and thus can keep the prices low.

Now I rather take his word than yours as he explained a lot about the fish and the Industry.

Cheers.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

It"S ME

Cletus. Funny. I spoke ot the owner of the local chain fugu restaurant and they only serve north-american caught Fugu as they don't need licensed chefs and thus can keep the prices low. Now I rather take his word than yours as he explained a lot about the fish and the Industry. Cheers.

Thats funny because l would take the word of the FDA and CDC over your word and the word of "a local".... And maybe you can explain to the poor people who were under the same assumption as you and ate US pufferfish not prepared correctly. Because they certainly learnt their lessons.

But by all means continue with your old wives tale and enjoy your fish!!!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

And maybe you could learn to post sans barbs and hidden insults.

Trust the FDA/CDC by all means they got such a spotless record .... NOT.

When was the last Fugu death in a restaurant in Japan? Not talking about the 2-3 annual death by fishermen who prepare it themselves.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Forgot to add.

"Thanks, for all the fish and the answer is 42".

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

“the victim, although completely paralysed, may be conscious and in some cases completely lucid until shortly before death”.

Maybe they were thinking, "Wish...I'd ... had... the ...chicken...."

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I was told but never checked its validity but, farmed puffer fish are not poisonous. Its the ones from the sea who feed on the algae that are poisonous.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And for about the 50th time.... another Puffer story. Just like the regurgitated Japanese TV Food programming so do we see another Puffer story. But its probably new to the Japanese themselves.... with one of the most aged populations in the world, and forgetfulness probably on an increase.... we'll be seeing a new puffer story every 6 months just to keep it fresh.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

there's a small expression in my local dialect i like to use frequently , roughly translated it's something like : he who never risks anything , stays virgin forever (it rhymes in local slang so it's not as funny in english) life is all about choices, if, no, WHEN, i ever get to japan, this is definitely something i need to do, i heard and read so much about it. It seems like a test of fate and faith, the ultimate gamble, no casino gives you that kind of kick and russian roulette is just a little too much. I'd definitely do this, i hope no soft-sector side tries to forbid it before i ever get there

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Mrmalic. You will be ok, JP will still be eating Blowies and using paper money, carbon based power long after the rest of the world has moved on, but hurry if you want to try Herbal highs or see a Kimono.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Licensed fugu chefs do NOT leave in ANY amount of poison, the "tingling and numbness" of the lips is an urban myth. My husband is licensed and I have eaten fugu prepared by him several times. It is a mild flavored white fish, I have had the sashimi, nabe and karaage. If it is prepared by a licensed chef there is no danger. It's the idiots who catch it themselves or buy it illegally thinking they can copy a diagram from Google that end up dying. Even at the Tsukiji, my husband has to show his license to be able to by unprepared fugu. Also, the article states the training takes "5 years" but my husband got his in less than a year with super-intensive study in Kanagawa and Tokyo. However the licensing does vary by prefecture. There is a written test that not only involves food safety and procedures but extensive study of the different varieties of fugu, and a skills test in which you have to successfully cut and separate the fugu correctly and with no chance of cross-contamination (using separate cutting boards, knives, towels, receptacles, etc.) in about 15 minutes. He used videos, practiced at home using "non-edible practice fugu" from Tsukiji, and went to a hands-on class every few weeks. It's a very intense process and that is precisely why eating fugu from a licensed chef is safe.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I like fish. Good raw fish if it is prepared safely, and I am not sure if I know how to do it.

The usual common stuff is fine with me. I don't need a fancy aquarium fish. Salmon is good. Tuna is great. Walleye, although I have not had it served raw, that does not mean I have not eaten it raw...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's rare, it's expensive, It was forbidden for a long time, it could be lethal - - - that makes it special. I've eaten it in small eating houses in the 60s, 70s and 80s, (and survived) prepared by a licensed chef owner, served with parts of the organs. Very delicious, tasting entirely different from what is served in the larger, safe(!), restaurants. Actually, I used to go on frequent fishing trips with this chef and I trusted him blindly. He stuck the fins on the windows of his establishment and the fins' hot sake was unbelievable. Having consumed the fugu, prepared in about every way possible, is a unique culinary experience, and having survived it, in life!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Won't be having it again though. Especially now that they've relaxed on the licensing.

The licensing has not been relaxed. Selling of fugu prepared off-site by a licensed chef is being allowed. Until now any restaurant that wanted to serve fugu had to have a licensed chef on the premises. Now they can order it from a licensed chef.

From October eateries will be allowed to buy in ready-prepared fugu—packaged or frozen, for example—provided it came from a licensed chef.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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