national

Quake jolts Kanto, Fukushima areas

21 Comments

An earthquake with a magnitude of 5.5 struck off Fukushima Prefecture on Friday afternoon. The quake, which occurred at 12:52 p.m., jolted parts of Ibaraki Prefecture, where it measured 4, as well as Fukushima, Saitama and Tochigi where it measured 3, the Japan Meteorological Agency reported. In Tokyo, Chiba, Gunma and Miyagi, it measured 2. No tsunami warning was issued.

The agency said the epicenter was at a depth of 20 kilometers off the Fukushima coast.

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21 Comments
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My phone was going crazy with its quake warnings but didn't feel a thing as I was on a train heading to southern Saitama. Hope all is well further north though.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Is fuel pool 4 still standing?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

It was felt as far as Odawara.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

didn`t feel it at all this time here in Meguro.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I'm in Tokyo and felt nothing. 12:15 I was walking in Ueno.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Definitely rocked the house a bit in mid-Ibaraki.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

No feel in my part of Tokyo, but the nurses sure felt it! As I was joking with my doctor that the okyu incense smell like weed.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Rocked where I was in Ochanomizu!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

didn't feel it in Gunma at all... mind I did change all the lights over so I don't notice any swaying and freak myself out ;)

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There was also a major earthquake in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Guatamala on November 7. The news reports say the U.S. Geological Survey and the Japan Meteorological agencies are reporting "depth of 20 kilometers" -- I believe they must mean distance rather than depth, because my understanding is that the deepest depth of the ocean is no more than approximately 12 kilometers (in the Challenger trench of the Marianas). Any clarification on these measurements would be most helpful.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

They mean depth. 20 km is how far below the surface of the earth it is, i.e. as you move towards the core- 40 km isn't unusual for an earthquake. It's got nothing to do with the depth of the ocean anywhere.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

To elaborate, I suppose this means at a depth under the earth's crust, but it is confusing in a news report about an earthquake "in the Pacific Ocean."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In Sumida, 5th floor, it was quite a significant one. Not frightening nor requesting self-protection, but quite a nice 30" jolt.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It wasn't just one earthquake but several......

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The big one is soon to come so everyone in the Kanto area should get out. If you think that the Fukushima earthquake was big, wait until the next one comes and you will see that the Fukushima earthquake was not so big after all.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

All we can really say is that these earthquakes will keep happening, in greater or lesser size, in that area of Japan.

Each one will be a fresh shock to get the tongues wagging again.

The question that pops up in my mind is always, like kurisupusu above, how much of this terrible shaking can No.4 used-fuel-rod pool continue to take?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The region will continue to have powerful quakes for at least the next 30 years.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

To elaborate, I suppose this means at a depth under the earth's crust, but it is confusing in a news report about an earthquake "in the Pacific Ocean."

I don't think so. Earthquakes are always reported with their magnitudes and depths, and anyone used to seeing earthquake reports (which anyone in Japan very much is) understands immediately that the depth given is beneath the crust, regardless of where the earthquake happened.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Zichi, so after 30 years Japan will have no more earthquakes??

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Elbuda

Zichi, so after 30 years Japan will have no more earthquakes??

That's like the weather forecaster saying " Rain will continue till Friday in Kyushu" and you replying "So after Friday Kyushu will have no more rain??"

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No, the region, like other parts of Japan will continue to have earthquakes but the quake last year released so much energy even the atomosphere moved. That energy will continue to cause powerful quakes for several decades and then decrease in strength.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

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