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Record 385 foreigners in Japan stripped of resident status in 2017

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The ministry also revoked the residency of foreign nationals who used the status they had obtained under the government-sponsored technical training program in order to work at another company after disappearing from their original workplace.

Yeah, what person in their right mind would not choose slave-labor over a decent paying job! The audacity of these ungrateful foreigners.

5 ( +12 / -7 )

Very good news.

-11 ( +6 / -17 )

Yeah, what person in their right mind would not choose slave-labor over a decent paying job! The audacity of these ungrateful foreigners.

That might be the case, but they still have to follow the laws regarding their residence status. Do it right or face the consequences,.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Some foreigners were found to have obtained their status by listing the names of companies that had no plans to hire them in their visa applications.

Based on the past tense "obtained" my understanding is that this means they successfully managed to get the status.

This would mean they did not check with the companies if the information given was true. Sounds unbelievable considering how strict the processes are. So do they actually only do random checks to selected people or something?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Yeah, what person in their right mind would not choose slave-labor over a decent paying job! The audacity of these ungrateful foreigners.

Why do you call it ''slave labor''? Slave Labor is when you are forced and coerced into doing something for no or little reward. Nobody is forcing these people to do anything, they chose to come to Japan and do that job. They are free to quit anytime they want. Yes, it would've better if they were free to choose among better alternatives, but this is not ''slave labor''. You are distorting the meaning of this word. Blacks in America were Slave Laborers, they were not free to quit and go back home.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Good.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Slave labor or slave of the system?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"Yeah, what person in their right mind would not choose slave-labor over a decent paying job! The audacity of these ungrateful foreigners."

Are they in chains?

Were they brought into the country forcefully?

Are the Japanese repressively preventing them from setting themselves free, and return to their own countries?

If the answer is "yes" to just one out of the three questions, then they're indeed slaves.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Tokyo is set to open the door to blue-collar laborers from abroad next April and upgrade the ministry's Immigration Bureau to an agency to respond to the anticipated surge in foreign workers.

ANTICIPATED?!?!

Clearly the message about hours long lines currently at the immigration office in Kyoto has yet to be received. If I want to renew my child’s visa I will have to take a day off work.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I’m curious how many (if any) PR were stripped of their status or is that not possible?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Clearly the message about hours long lines currently at the immigration office in Kyoto has yet to be received. If I want to renew my child’s visa I will have to take a day off work.

The upgrade of the Immigration Bureau is related to opening the door to foreign blue collar workers aka workers who add value to the J economy. The rest has no priority..

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"I’m curious how many (if any) PR were stripped of their status or is that not possible?"

 Your permanent residency is not as "permanent" as many think it to be.

Permanent residents can have their status revoked and expelled (deported) to their original country.

There's only once certain way of not being deported: be a national of that country.

Even then, non-born citizens could still be deported for serious offences against the State (treason in times of war); it's rare but possible (denaturalisation is the appropriate name).

To sum up:

 

Your permanent residency can be taken away from you (not going into details);

Even if you're a naturalised citizen, you're still liable to deportation under strictly regulated situations;

A full proof way of avoiding this is (in Japan):

a) be born in Japan &

b) at least one of your parents must be originally Japanese.

These observations stem from my workings within a Common Law Jurisdiction; the same reasoning appear in Civil Systems as well.

Disclaimer: In relation to Japan it would be highly unlikely they would depart from the international norm.

Hope it helps (and not deleted, as irrelevant).

Regards

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Mike: From reading the article it seems that many of these people who have been caught up in this were guilty of making false claims or statements on immigration related documents or obtaining their visas in a not so above the board way. I think peeping tom summed it up pretty well; having a PR is not a guarantee that you cannot be deported. I have had PR for a while and my opinion is that someone would have to do something pretty bad to have the PR status revoked.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Always the poorer and desperate who fall foul of a system that might be seen to be taking advantage of them.

You won't see any of the Western sons and daughters of the elite getting deported.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I understand the government wanting to avoid abuse of the student visa, but I hope they can get their act together. At our university, several new foreign masters students will miss the start of the new semester next week because of delays in getting their visa.

Clearly the message about hours long lines currently at the immigration office in Kyoto has yet to be received. If I want to renew my child’s visa I will have to take a day off work.

Yeah, one day off to submit the application, and one day off to pick it up.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

References to "slave labor" are ridiculous.

Given the number of foreign nationals in Japan, 385 is not a significant figure. It is 0.00004 percent of the currently registered foreign population (2.56 million according to the Homusho web site).

http://www.moj.go.jp/nyuukokukanri/kouhou/nyuukokukanri04_00073.html

One way to lose permanent residency is to stay outside of Japan for more than two years. The US and the UK have a similar rule.

Foreign nationals lose their residency status in the US and the UK quite easily, much more easily than in Japan. Search on "Windrush generation" to see just how nasty Britain is.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"Foreign nationals lose their residency status in the US and the UK quite easily, much more easily than in Japan. Search on "Windrush generation" to see just how nasty Britain is."

Plus now, lots of British born and bred Muslim are being stripped off British nationality.

Ignorance is bliss, or so they say.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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