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Renovated Hiroshima A-bomb museum building opens with new exhibits

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Read up on the real history as to why Japan attacked Pearl Harbor (for no reason at all?!)

while your at it read up the real reason why Japan attacked China and most of Asia more than 10yrs before attaching Pearl Harbour, killing millions in the process, that where the real war crimes started.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"It was necessary to end the war soon" which you learned at schools in U.S.

no it was necessary to end the war with as few AMerican and allies lives saved as possible. Unfortunately in war you dont worry about how many of the enemy die. An invasion of the mainland would have been brutal, and the huge loss of life in Okinawa was a small prequel to what a mainland invasion would have been like. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWP_qhFnXoc

0 ( +0 / -0 )

serendipitous1Apr. 26 11:07 pm JST

bronwy 1 & halwick

Read up on the real history as to why Japan attacked Pearl Harbor (for no reason at all?!) and why the US decided to commit war crimes by dropping atomic bombs on civilians.

Thanks for your reply.

Re reading up - well I actually have quite a lot over the past decades - quite a lot.

Opinions will always be divided, and discussion is necessary to analyze and determine fair assessments.

Japan did not only attack Pearl Harbor on that day - in fact it attacked Malaysia, Thailand, Philipines, Wake & Guam, Shanghai, Midway, HongKong and maybe more.

Why? Simply to gain access to raw materials and resources and to stamp their authority over Greater East Asia.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Nihei said she admired Akihito's efforts, including trips to overseas battle sites such as Saipan in 2005 to pray for war dead from Japan and other countries.

*"When I saw the image of the emperor and empress (bowing at a seaside cliff) on Saipan, I felt they were truly sorry for the sins the Emperor Showa had committed," she said, referring to Hirohito by his posthumous name. "I was moved."*

https://japantoday.com/category/national/japan's-heisei-imperial-era-three-generations-look-back-and-ahead

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Read up on the real history as to why Japan attacked Pearl Harbor (for no reason at all?!) and why the US decided to commit war crimes by dropping atomic bombs on civilians.

Let me guess what you're driving at. (1) Japan had to attack Pearl Harbor because the US stopped oil shipments to Japan, which was a response to Japan raping Asia. (2) The US dropped the atomic bombs to show Russia that we had atomic bombs and because the US didn't care about Japanese because they weren't white like the Germans, never mind that Germany surrendered before the US had a functioning atomic bomb to drop on Berlin.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Halwick

I would say the U.S. atomic bomb was actually a blessing in disguise for Japan

I would say your choice of language here is a major problem for some of us. It sticks in the throat to say that the dropping of two bombs on major population centres, resulting in the deaths of between 130,000 and 230,000 people, were a "blessing in disguise." They were no kind of blessing, in disguise or not.

Assuming the scenario of extended war and the potential Russian invasion to be correct (and I certainly agree that the first part of that is undeniable) then I think you can say that compared to that scenario coming true then the dropping of the nuclear bombs was, at best, the lesser of two evils.

Let's not forget that the Nagasaki and Hiroshima bombings did not occur because of an American desire to save Japanese lives. They occurred because of an American desire to save American lives. Understandable, given there was a war on and the Americans had lost enough lives among their own, but not much comfort to those Japanese civilians and forced labourers and others who died or suffered because of it, and because of the criminal irresponsibility of their own leaders.

I think that's something the Hiroshima Peace Museum does well - it asks us to remember those lost lives, just for once, just for themselves, before we start considering the politics of blame.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

If you are going to Hiroshima, do not say that "It was necessary to end the war soon" which you learned at schools in U.S.

I didn't say it, but my Japanese friend did.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

A-Bombings have been a crime against humanity never condemned.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

bronwy 1 & halwick

Read up on the real history as to why Japan attacked Pearl Harbor (for no reason at all?!) and why the US decided to commit war crimes by dropping atomic bombs on civilians.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

itsonlyrocknroll "Review recent United Nations Human Rights Council reports will provide more than an inkling into the direction the Government of China is heading. Compete dominance over 90% of the South China Sea." What does the UN say about US/Israeli occupation of Palestinian lands, what does the UN say about human rights abuses of Palestinians by Israel? Another example of American Exceptionalism.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@seredipitous1,

So you ARE saying that a costly invasion by the U.S. and Soviet Union, resulting in millions of civilian Japanese deaths and prolonging the war and ending in a postwar Japan divided into two countries -- a DPRK-like North Japan and democratic South Japan -- would have been the better decision and preferable fate for Japan. Somehow I don't think so and I doubt anyone else would think so either.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

serendipitous1Today 09:58 pm JST

Halwick

And if Japan had nuked two US cities and killed hundred of thousands of civilians in the process, would you ever consider it to be 'a blessing in disguise' for the US? Somehow I don't think so.

Can't catch your drift.

If you mean if the US started the war by a surprise attack on Japan and then proceded to invade, conquer much of east / s.e. asia, resulting in the deaths of millions of innocents, and the bombing would have stopped their assaults and saved countless lives - well then yes, I guess some could argue it may be justified.

Is that your meaning?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Halwick

And if Japan had nuked two US cities and killed hundred of thousands of civilians in the process, would you ever consider it to be 'a blessing in disguise' for the US? Somehow I don't think so.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

 I certainly wasn't aware that Japan had made its first steps towards a nuclear capacity of its own. I don't have much doubt that the Japanese military would have used it if it had it.

And nobody wants that dirty little secret known as it would detract from Japan's "atomic bomb victim" story.

Japan actually had two independent atomic bomb programs: "Ni-Go Project" (Army) and "F-Go Project (Navy).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_nuclear_weapon_program#Ni-Go_Project

There is an intriguing but never substantiated story that Japan might have successfully detonated an test atomic bomb in Konan, North Korea just days before the actual end of the war. But who knows what really happened in Japan and North Korea during those closing days. (Many claim Japan didn't have the knowledge or resources to build an atomic bomb. These same "experts" were also claiming at the beginning of the Pacific War that Japan couldn't build a superior fighter plane or a massive super battleship.)

Had they succeeded in preventing Hirohito from making his announcement of surrender, they might well have forced Japan to fight on until a real Armageddon.

That is what Japan's "Operation Ketsu-Go" was preparing for.

The sooner the Americans come, the better...One hundred million die proudly. (Japanese wartime slogan circa Summer 1945)

https://fas.org/irp/eprint/arens/chap4.htm

https://fas.org/irp/eprint/arens/chap5.htm

Although many cite Japan was already beaten, Japan actually had reserve army and aircraft in the mainland ready for the anticipated invasion plus millions of Japanese civilians ready to defend their country.

In debating the use of the atomic bomb and whether it was justified, very few bother to discuss the probable alternative ending, i.e, invasion of Japan mainland and ending in a "Armageddon" as you say, The "Battle of Japan" would have been more horrific than the "Battle of Okinawa" and would have prolonged the war well into 1946 with millions of Japanese civilians killed as Imperial Japanese military desperately fights to the very end, refusing to surrender.

Then there's the horrifying thought that had Japan been successful in developing their atomic bomb, they would have used it against the invading Americans in Kyushu. American GIs and Marines would have landed on radioactive beaches.

Can we honestly say that this "Armageddon" ending would have been preferable ending for Japan than the way it actually happened?

And furthermore, a forgotten fact frequently glossed over is that the Soviet Union was poised to invade the Hokkaido on 24 August, well in advance of the 1 November American invasion on Kyushu. By then, North Japan would have been under Soviet occupation and South Japan under American occupation, resulting in a divided Japan much like divided Germany.

I would say the U.S. atomic bomb was actually a blessing in disguise for Japan: It was a major factor in convincing Japan to end the war before an actual Soviet invasion; it avoided the inevitable invasion with accompanying millions in civilian casualties; and lastly it prevented Japan from being divided into a communist North Japan and democratic South Japan.

Lastly, it was the atomic bomb that turned Japan into a peace-loving pacifist nation pledged to forsake war as a solution to conflicts. Had the atomic bomb not been used, Japan might have retained their prewar Imperialist military mindset.

I'm sure the renovated Hiroshima museum or any revisionist history will never discuss that probable alternative end.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Halwick,

Thanks, very enlightening discussion, I certainly wasn't aware that Japan had made its first steps towards a nuclear capacity of its own. I don't have much doubt that the Japanese military would have used it if it had it. Which leads me to my second point:-

When discussing what Hirohito could or could not have done, I don't think we can forget the utter fanaticism and irrationality of the Army and its commanders, along with the Ministry for War. Max Hastings describes this really well in his book Nemesis: The Battle For Japan, 1944-45. I think this was something Hirohito and the more rational members of his Cabinet had to be wary of - the proof of that being the inability of a large cadre of Army officers to accept the decision to surrender, and to attempt the coup of August '45.

Had they succeeded in preventing Hirohito from making his announcement of surrender, they might well have forced Japan to fight on until a real Armageddon.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Very thoughtful question and one of the debatable controversies about the actual role Hirohito played during the war, i.e., the extent of his authority and direct involvement. But there is evidence that he favored the Imperial Japan expansionism in Asia, authorized the war campaigns from the very beginning as early as 1931, but at the same time, he was kept isolated and not told the real truth that Japan was losing by late 1944.

It seems a stretch to think Hirohito was kept in the dark about Japan losing.

Regardless, during those days following after the Hiroshima bombing , there was internal power struggle between those advocating continuing the war and those ending the war. Finally, to break the deadlock, Hirohito stepped in and made the decision to end the war and accept surrender. Then there was the "Kyuju incident", an attempted military coup on the night of Aug 15-16 to stop the move to surrender. Fortunately the coup was not successful and Hirohito was able to make his unprecedented announcement of surrender.

Why would Hirohito chose surrender if he was unaware of the losses?

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Yes, visiting ground zero and the museum is a very moving experience indeed. However, don't lose perspective on why it happened. The truth is, if these bombs had not been dropped to force Japan's surrender we would all be speaking Russian now. At that time, there were 200,000 Russian troops readied to invade Japan through Hokkaido with orders to kill everybody and everything. The relentlessness and cruelty of the Japanese imperial military killed millions of people throughout Asia in the first half of last century. This is not something that can be swept away. Japan was a victim in the first half of last century. It was a victim of its own cruelty and desire to take over Asia.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Undoubtedly, the most exciting and emotional visit I have ever made to a city. I left the museum with tears in my eyes. Surely I will return to feel the spirit of this fantastic city.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombing_of_Tokyo

> Operation Meetinghouse, which was conducted on the night of 9–10 March 1945, is regarded as the single most destructive bombing raid in human history.[1] 16 square miles (41 km2) of central Tokyo were destroyed, leaving an estimated 100,000 civilians dead 

will banning nuclear weapons prevent the above terror and horror from conventional fire bombing ?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I'm not certain how Hirohito could have been utterly powerless to stop the war on August 7, but somehow had the authority to do so a mere 8 days later on the 15th.

Very thoughtful question and one of the debatable controversies about the actual role Hirohito played during the war, i.e., the extent of his authority and direct involvement. But there is evidence that he favored the Imperial Japan expansionism in Asia, authorized the war campaigns from the very beginning as early as 1931, but at the same time, he was kept isolated and not told the real truth that Japan was losing by late 1944.

Regardless, during those days following after the Hiroshima bombing , there was internal power struggle between those advocating continuing the war and those ending the war. Finally, to break the deadlock, Hirohito stepped in and made the decision to end the war and accept surrender. Then there was the "Kyuju incident", an attempted military coup on the night of Aug 15-16 to stop the move to surrender. Fortunately the coup was not successful and Hirohito was able to make his unprecedented announcement of surrender.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

all conventional morality is thrown out the window

and that is why war crimes had to be codified, specifically in this context 'targeting of non-combatant' is a war crime, Japan can't excuse itself, nor can other axis of powers during the war, and why no museum will ever remember this fact.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

What is lost in context of this whole discussion......and in the atomic bomb museums.....is the fact that there was a war going on. And in wars, nations will use whatever weapons are available, or create new weapons, to win the war.

When nations commit themselves to WAR, all conventional morality is thrown out the window and the nation as a whole, its leaders, the fighting men (or women), etc. will do whatever it takes to KILL the enemy and WIN the war. Wartime propaganda (unthinkable during peacetime) will stir up hatred to continue the war. Even the folks at home....women, children, elderly who cannot fight, will contribute to the war effort by praying for the enemy's defeat or work in factories building weapons that will win the war for their country.

During wartime, people will do things they would never do under peacetime.

THAT'S THE REALITY OF WAR.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The dictatorships of China and North Korea is an existential threat to the Government and People of Japan,

It is though Beijing’s development of an enhanced intermediate range missile capability. Coupled with a program of geopolitical belligerence in weaponising past historical grievance that threatens the entire region.

Review recent United Nations Human Rights Council reports will provide more than an inkling into the direction the Government of China is heading. Compete dominance over 90% of the South China Sea.

My concern is that sooner or later The Government of Japan will have little choice than to repeal /revoke it pacifist constitution and develop an independent offshore deterrent.

The newly renovated Hiroshima A-bomb museum would then represent a failure globally to fully appreciate the futility ownership and eventual tactical use of weapons of mass destruction.

This must go hand in hand through the education system for future generation to comprehend the dangers right in front of them.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

SchopenhauerToday 08:16 am JST

If you are going to Hiroshima, do not say that "It was necessary to end the war soon" which you learned at schools in U.S.

Yes - I agree. Instead one should ask ,

"Why was it that the Greed, Cruelty & Megalomaniacal desires of MEN (not women) lead to so much suffering and death, culminating in the savage obliteration of Hiroshima and it's citizens?"

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

BTW, I just remembered. Wasn't the museum fixed up prior to Obama's visit. I was there a month or so before his visit and the museum was closed.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If you are going to Hiroshima, do not say that "It was necessary to end the war soon" which you learned at schools in U.S.

Why not say that? It s true, it ended thr war, and ended Japan's reign of yetror in Asia.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

For a couple of reasons: 1) Japan refused to accept the unconditional surrender terms because of the implications of Hirohito being tried as a war criminal and executed, thereby ending the Emperor monarchy (fortunately Gen. MacArthur didn't allow that to happen); and 2) The Imperial Japanese military "bushido code" disallowed any thoughts of surrender, instead vowing to fight to the very end. But yes, its a wonder why Emperor Hirohito didn't step in earlier. Perhaps he wanted to.

I'm not certain how Hirohito could have been utterly powerless to stop the war on August 7, but somehow had the authority to do so a mere 8 days later on the 15th.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Good start for an exchange of views, but we should wait until August.

Why wait until August when we have an article about the museum for the bomb that should have ended the war on August 6th, but Hirohito decided to drag the war out until August 15th?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

*There was a Japanese newspaper in display from the day after the bombing that evidence that the Japanese government understood that the US had superweapons. This caused me to wonder why Hirohito waited at all to surrender.*

For a couple of reasons: 1) Japan refused to accept the unconditional surrender terms because of the implications of Hirohito being tried as a war criminal and executed, thereby ending the Emperor monarchy (fortunately Gen. MacArthur didn't allow that to happen); and 2) The Imperial Japanese military "bushido code" disallowed any thoughts of surrender, instead vowing to fight to the very end. But yes, its a wonder why Emperor Hirohito didn't step in earlier. Perhaps he wanted to.

Does the museum still avoid giving historical context for the decision to drop the bomb, such as the suicidal resistance by Japanese in Okinawa and the Philippines?

Oh I'm sure it still avoids. I doubt it even mentions that Japan was also pursuing its own atomic bomb program. But then the museum's purpose was meant to present the effects of a nuclear attack.......along with the subliminal guilt of portraying Japan being the only victim of a nuclear attack perpetrated by the U.S..

It is unfortunate that Stalin, Khrushchev, Mao, and more recently Kim, did not take Hiroshima and Nagasaki into conscious consideration before embarking and building up their nuclear programs. And let's not forget the Soviet Union, under Khrushchev, built and detonated the most powerful hydrogen bomb ever.....the 50+ megaton "Tsar Bomba" in 1961.

Let's also remember that prior to 1945 there were NO nuclear weapons, yet the world was involved in World Wars throughout the centuries. After 1945, the threat of nuclear weapons and destruction made World Wars unthinkable and unwinnable. In this way they had unintended effect of encouraging dialog in settling disputes and promoting "World Peace".

It's unfortunate the Unit 731 museum in Harbin, China, isn't as well known as the HIroshima and Nagasaki museums. The effects of biological and chemical warfare are just as terrible as radiation. Let's pray that there shall never be a war fought with biological and chemical weapons, either..

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Maybe no historical context that justifies killing civilians, but there is always value in exploring the historical context behind an atrocity, whether that be the bombing of Hiroshima, the bombing of Pearl Harbour, the 9/11 attack, the rape of Nanking, the massacre in Rwanda, and so on; understanding the context helps us prevent a similar occurrence, and that is what this museum is all about.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I think Anonymous, the classroom subject matter could be centred around the ethics of war, not the blame game that surround the politics of war.....

I had a recent discussion about the whole philosophy of victors justice with more revisionist senior family members. I am surprised the proportion of blame they attribute to the then Imperialist Government.

Was it right to bomb Hiroshima?.......

http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zq7yg82

2 ( +2 / -0 )

One or two photos here........

Renovated Hiroshima A-bomb museum building opens with new exhibits

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20190425/p2g/00m/0dm/083000c

Computer mock ups more informative

The renovation of east wing of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20170719/hre/00m/0na/001000d

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@cl68: '....... giving historical context for the decision to drop the bomb,

.

What do you mean by "historical context for the decision to drop the bomb?'

There is NO "historical context for ANY country that justifies murdering civilians.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Governments determine through policy strategies for education providers.

The relevant Department for Education is responsible for all stages of cultural dynamics, services, from early years, primary school up to University.

Policy governed and steered though the Ministry of Education, Sports, Science, and Technology, and The National Institute for Policy Research.

Academics, intellectual elites are not mandated or able to deicide historic grievances political interpretation.

It is through the ballot box that Politician are held directly accountable so mandated

http://www.nier.go.jp/English/educationjapan/index.html

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Disappointed, a story about a renovation with no pics, not a single pic.

Agree with other posters here, it's a very emotional place, descending down to the entrance you almost feel like entering another world.

Yes, like others here, I also found loud Europeans and Chinese tourists off putting (can I say every French person I came close to, young and old, speaks so loud for such a solemn place, the managers should put up signs asking people to be quiet).

5 ( +7 / -2 )

I went there a couple of years ago. It was quite creepy and sad. Some of the displays were a little disturbing. However, there was an overwhelming sense of Japan being the victim. There was also a large group of the ever present right wing loons spouting all there anti-foreigner garbage. I stood in the crowd of onlookers to listen to the crap that they were spotting and the joker with the mic told me to leave. :D

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

If you contend, and interpret past and present US Governments and historians that argue the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were necessary and justified and in so reasoning that conclusion disingenuous.

Please what is your honest appraisal why such events took place.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@itsonlyrocknroll

However the Government of Japan has a responsibility to deliver a comprehsive historic account

@Raw Beer

This applies to all sides. I have yet to hear the US government deliver an honest historic account of why they dropped the bombs, or anything else for that matter....

Government, whether Japanese, American or any other, have a responsibility to not falsify, hide or destroy records pertaining to their activity especially pertaining to war.

It is the responsibility of scholars to do the research and draw truthful conclusions from the information available.

It is the responsibility of the press to make these conclusions available to their readership in a balanced manner.

And, just as importantly, it is the responsibility of the public to familiarize themselves with the conclusions drawn by those above and, if necessary, push for reconsideration of some conclusions.

Don’t make governments responsible for anything except for staying out of the way.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

However the Government of Japan has a responsibility to deliver a comprehsive historic account with lessons learned through the education system. This can be achieved in dignified manner.

This applies to all sides. I have yet to hear the US government deliver an honest historic account of why they dropped the bombs, or anything else for that matter....

4 ( +9 / -5 )

The renovated Hiroshima A-bomb museum certainly presents the tragic devastating conclusion leading up to the Imperial Japanese Army Government defeat signalling the end of World War II.

However do honourable members of the japan ageing political establishment, Prime Minster Abe cabinet and ruling Government learnt at least politically from such unprecedented loss of life.

Perhaps the answer can be found some 800km away in The Yushukan War Memorial Museum.

I don't believe the peace loving people of Japan should be held responsible or accountable for the horrors the Imperial Japanese Army committed. Or it should be necessary, generation after generation be required to politically apologise

However the Government of Japan has a responsibility to deliver a comprehsive historic account with lessons learned through the education system. This can be achieved in dignified manner.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

@Chip Star

This caused me to wonder why Hirohito waited at all to surrender.

Good start for an exchange of views, but we should wait until August.

@Schopenhauer

If you are going to Hiroshima, do not say that "It was necessary to end the war soon" which you learned at schools in U.S.

Nearly all of what I know about Hiroshima and hence the basis of my opinion comes from my own reading. I would hope the same is true of other posters. That said, note my comment to Chip Star above.

@Goodlucktoyou

Go there. But avoid loud groups of Americans without manners.

No, don’t avoid them. Engage them. If you have tact and patience you may find that such people may change their behavior once they understand the deeper significance of the place. The same applies to many people everywhere around the world.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"Go there. But avoid loud groups of Americans without manners." As an American that has traveled to Japan six or so times, I have to agree with that statement. I travel solo and any time I see a herd of tourist, I avoid them like the plague. I visited the Hiroshima museum, but I didn't have the heart to take one picture. But, I will walk around the plaza area.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

I visited in 2014. I thought it was very balanced. There was a prominent display explaining why Hiroshima was a legitimate military target (not necessarily a nuclear one) detailing its importance to the Japanese war effort. No overt criticism of the decision to drop the bomb itself, but no pulling punches on the hideous damage cause to people and city either - which is why the memorial park exists, after all.

Most people were quiet and respectful. One loud-mouthed European, I remember, who didn't seem to realize he wasn't in a theme park. As a Westerner, a hard place to visit without feeling a certain unease, even if your own ancestors had nothing to do with the bombing. People should certainly visit, either there or Nagasaki.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

Go there. But avoid loud groups of Americans without manners.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

If you are going to Hiroshima, do not say that "It was necessary to end the war soon" which you learned at schools in U.S.

6 ( +15 / -9 )

Does the museum still avoid giving historical context for the decision to drop the bomb, such as the suicidal resistance by Japanese in Okinawa and the Philippines?

-9 ( +11 / -20 )

When I visited in2003, the museum was quite balanced. There was a Japanese newspaper in display from the day after the bombing that evidence that the Japanese government understood that the US had superweapons. This caused me to wonder why Hirohito waited at all to surrender.

1 ( +11 / -10 )

I wish I knew that most of the museum had closed in April 2017, before I took my son & his spouse down to Hiroshima for a an overnighter during Christmas that year. It was a bit disappointing. But, at least they got to see the dome, which is quite sobering unto itself.

And, they got to enjoy a night at a Ryokan on Miyajima, which is always enjoyable and a nice antidote for the sadness around ground zero.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

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