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Researchers find second Japanese warship sunk in Battle of Midway

13 Comments
By CALEB JONES

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Well there were quite a few sunk.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Well there were quite a few sunk.

Yes, as the war went on it seems like the only reason the Japanese Navy left port was to provide target practice for the American air force. Virtually no air cover of their own, sitting targets.

The Australian poet Les Murray wrote a great poem about diving at the site of a sunken Japanese aircraft carrier. It's called Aqualung Shinto.

https://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/murray-les/poems/aqualung-shinto-0560058

3 ( +4 / -1 )

What's the point of finding these sunken ships? Will it help humanity?

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Yeh, the Yanks had broken the codes, and were waiting for them

Just like they had broken the codes before Pearl Harbor, but didn't warn the Pearl defenders, because they had deliberately enticed the attack, and wanted a heavy loss of life in order to change US public's attitude into joining in WWII. They had been setting increasingly powerful sanctions against Japan for a year, before Japan bit the bait. Read 'Day of Deceit' by Robert B. Stinnett.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

"....was to provide target practice for the American air force."

More so the US submarines, which ring-fenced the archipeligo. At Midway, however, both sides were evenly matched. The US won by superior strategy.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

See a Unesco plead on the horizon

4 ( +4 / -0 )

What's the point of finding these sunken ships? Will it help humanity?

its called histrory, if you dont learn from it its bound to repeat itself. Its also an underwater grave site.

It a comfort to many families to know where their father/ grandfathers final moments where and where they rest

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Looks like a butt crushed into a gold-leaf byobu screen.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Virtually no air cover of their own, sitting targets.

That is not my understanding of the battle at all. The six Japanese carriers in the battle were CARRYING plenty of aircraft and were smashing wave after disorganized wave of inferior, outdated American planes, or those American planes were lost or turning back for lack of fuel...plus missing their targets and/or torpedoes and bombs failing to explode. In fact it was beginning to look like it was going to be a disaster for the U.S. ...up until some American squadrons of dive bombers showed up (I think one was actually lost and late) and Japanese planes were either flying low from the last defense or were landed on the decks and being refueled. Then it was game over for the Japanese because THEN they were sitting ducks.

America won for essentially two reasons 1) luck ( esp. in timing) and 2) having broke the Japanese code. You could also throw in tenacity and bravery, but the Japanese were no less so even if it was the Americans that really had to prove it that day. Also the location of the American fleet was unknown to the Japanese, but that encompasses the luck and the code breaking so....

2 ( +5 / -3 )

That is not my understanding of the battle at all.

I thought it was clear that BigYen's comment was referencing all the battles AFTER Midway because Japan lost so many carriers at Midway they no longer had enough carriers to provide sufficient air cover..

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Dom Palmer, thank you. That was indeed what I meant.

Obviously in WW2 the Japanese Army and Navy had to be stopped by whatever it took, but when you read the later accounts of the Japanese Navy sailing out to its inevitable destruction it's hard not to feel sorry for the poor devils trapped and sunk in their floating coffins.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

because they had deliberately enticed the attack, and wanted a heavy loss of life in order to change US public's attitude into joining in WWII. They had been setting increasingly powerful sanctions against Japan for a year, before Japan bit the bait. Read 'Day of Deceit' by Robert B. Stinnett.

Sorry? How exactly did the US "entice" the attack?

You're suggesting America should have continued selling oil to a hostile nation?

And Stinnett's book has been widely dismissed as nonsense by historians.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This is significant for those relatives of the Service men who went down with the Ship. Now they have closure and know where at least their Relation rests. The Site should presumably be declared a War memorial site.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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