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Rikuzentakata's lone pine tree that survived tsunami dying

12 Comments

A pine tree, believed to be 260 years old, and which survived the March 11 tsunami in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture, is dying because its roots have been rotted by salt water and its branches have withered.

The "miracle tree," as it has been dubbed, was the sole survivor of an immense grove that previously contained 70,000 trees in a 2-kilomter stretch along the coast. Since March 11, it has become a rallying symbol for survivors and a drawcard for tourists.

Rikuzentakata Mayor Futoshi Toba told a news conference on Tuesday that efforts had been made to save the 30-meter-tall tree but to no avail, NHK reported. Many locals thanked the tree for giving them courage.

The Japan Greenery Research and Development Center, whose experts have been examining the tree, said on its website Tuesday that it will consider ways to preserve the remains of the tree as a monument. Nine grafts from the tree are currently growing on other trees, so the legacy will live on, said the center.

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12 Comments
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It was one of the most iconic remains after the tsunami that showed hope for the survivors.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It must have witnessed a lot of other big muther tsunami too ne.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You missed the point, albeit it was a rather deep metaphor

It wasn't even a metaphor.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

pictures or it didn't happen.

-1 ( +2 / -4 )

Wow! Some people are on a thumbs-down rampage.

In a way, the tree does show resilience in tough times. But just like humans, there comes a time to fight for survival, and also a time when we just succumb.

Shall we go on fighting till we can't fight anymore? Or shall we just surrender as soon as the fight starts?

-2 ( +2 / -3 )

Shintoism lives on. RIP treesan.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

you COULD say it reflects post-disaster construction priorities

Perhaps it does, but not in the way you are suggesting. Maybe they are putting funds and effort towards assisting people and not transplanting trees?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Sod it.

All this time, money, and resources spent to keep one tree alive, when people need attention.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Clearly it's going to die if left in that environment. I realize it stands as a more potent symbol there, but transplant the thing to safer grounds and see if it can be saved. It's not saying much about a 'miracle' when you let it rot and die like all around it, but I guess you COULD say it reflects post-disaster construction priorities and how the nation's spirit, which survived, is floundering while the government puts money earmarked to help the area elsewhere.

Carefully transplant it and let it be displayed in a lovely park somewhere.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Elvensilvan: "Wow! Some people are on a thumbs-down rampage."

It's just people from other threads who are upset they cannot rebut other posters' comments, so they react like children.

Apsara: "Perrhaps it does, but not in the way you are suggesting. Maybe they are putting funds and effort towards assisting people and not transplanting trees?

You missed the point, albeit it was a rather deep metaphor. I was saying it reflects the overall government attitude to the needs of the area, including, of course, the people (they are not helping, instead buying fighter jets and putting money towards whaling). Hence, the tree (or people here) -- which is in need -- is dying.

-7 ( +2 / -8 )

it ain't the salt water thats killing this tree....

-9 ( +1 / -8 )

It is good that it is dieing. Shows proof that nothing should be living there in tsunami zone anyway.

-10 ( +2 / -10 )

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