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Rubella infection cases in Japan quintuple from previous year

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This disease was wiped out in ‘modern’ countries decades ago. Japan still has a problem with TB as well. For a country that touts itself as a technologically advanced country of the new millennium it seems to have a lot of third world problems.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

And one reason why it spreads so easily, people like the ojisan I saw on the train yesterday. Sneezing and spraying their body fluids into the crowd with no attempt at all to cover up.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

For those of us near 50, our vaccines might be wearing off and a booster might be necessary. You can go to your doctor and get a test, I believe, that shows your level of immunity.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

papigiulio is correct. Certainly in my case the Doctor offered to place it on my kids bottom or sole of the foot. I didn't have my children vaccinated for T.B. over here for the reason of the scarring. When I went back to the U.K. they were vaccinated where there is a minimal scarring. You have to consider the false negative from T.B. too.

However, this article is about rubella and the rubella vaccination doesn't scar like the T.B. jab. If you are concerned about the combination jabs then you can request to have them given individually.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

No doh...the National Institute of Health here is to blame! History again repeats itself!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5557250/

In 1989, a combination measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, targeting all children aged 1 to 6 years, was introduced into the National Immunization Program (NIP).1 However, in 1993, due to reports of serious aseptic meningitis following the MMR vaccination, the Japanese government decided to withdraw its recommendation for the MMR vaccine. Ironically, the subsequent incidence of serious aseptic meningitis occurring among unvaccinated patients contracting natural mumps was reported to be as high as 1.24%, whereas the incidence was only 0.05% as a result of the mumps vaccine.2 This decision has become a significant social concern in Japan.

In 1995, the NIP revised its vaccination policy, to now strongly recommend, but not make mandatory, the rubella vaccine for both males and females, aged 12–90 months. On 4 subsequent occasions the government made temporary recommendation changes specific to different populations susceptible to rubella: for first- and second-year elementary school students, in 1995; for first-year elementary school students, in 1996–1999; for junior high school students without a history of rubella, in 2001–2003; and for unvaccinated individuals aged 16–24 years, in 2001–2003.1 From 2006 onward, measles and rubella vaccine (MR) has been given free-of-charge to children aged 1 y and 5–6 y.1 More than 10 y passed before NIP resumed its recommendation for the MR vaccine. As a result, there are susceptible pockets among female birth cohorts 1989–1993, with seropositive proportions of 78.3%.3

Due directly to these gaps in ‘herd’ immunization resulting from politicized transitions in vaccination policy by the government, there were outbreaks of rubella with 17,050 cases reported between the years of 2012 and 2014,4 and 45 cases of congenital rubella syndrome reported to the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases from week 1, 2012 to week 40, 2014.5 Currently, the majority of recent rubella epidemic cases are occurring among adults aged 20–40. There still exist large populations susceptible to rubella in Japan.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@Chip Star - You'd think the hideous trackmarks the vaccinations here leave would indicate their are objecting people with every vaccination at once.

That is just the TB vaccination. There was a test done in India and 60% of those vaccinated still contracted TB. The only effective way to control TB is by isolation. However, the vaccine for rubella is effective and does stop people contracting the disease, but only if it’s used.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@papigiulio

Tokyo Surgical and Medical Clinic at Shibakoen in Minato-ku will allow you to choose where you want the TB shot on your child for a fee.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

You'd think the hideous trackmarks the vaccinations here leave would indicate their are objecting people with every vaccination at once.

I heard you can actually choose where you want that the be placed. Doesn't always have to be shoulder. Anyway will find out next week when the little one gets her shots.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

watched a guy let out a sneeze yesterday... didn't even raise a finger to try and cover his mouth. Just blamo! Watch my saliva travel 6 meters.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The vaccination does not leave a mark. Anyway, what is a small scar compared to contracting measles and risking your child or a vulnerable person becoming deaf, blind, brain damaged or even dying.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I was pregnant during the 2013 outbreak and my OBGYN was adamant that I wear a mask and constantly wash my hands. It was rough. All of my immediately family hadn't be vaccinated and a few of my in-laws refused to be, boiling it down to me overreacting. Was not a fun time wearing a mask in the summer, tbh. Currently my sister in law is newly pregnant and the same family members are again refusing to get vaccinated and it's infuriating. If you won't get vaccinated for your own sake I just don't know why you wouldn't get it done for the greater good of those around you, especially your family members. Senseless.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

This disease was wiped out in ‘modern’ countries decades ago. Japan still has a problem with TB as well. For a country that touts itself as a technologically advanced country of the new millennium it seems to have a lot of third world problems.

Cases of measles have reached a record high in Europe this year, with more cases recorded in the first six months of 2018 than any other 12-month period this decade, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). More than 41,000 children and adults contracted measles in the European region from January to June -- almost double the number of people infected with measles for all of 2017.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/08/20/health/measles-europe-record-who-intl/index.html

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This disease was wiped out in ‘modern’ countries decades ago.

That's not the case.

A Forbes article, taking figures from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, states: In the first three months of 2012, 11,809 rubella cases were reported among 25 European countries, compared with annual totals of 8,320 in 2011 and 4,767 in 2010, according to the ECDC. Vaccination status was known for 99 percent of the cases (10,661), 99 percent of which (10,516) were reported as unvaccinated, and one percent as having received one dose of rubella vaccine.

You'll find this problem affecting many other countries, because no country is immune to antivaccine nonsense, and decreased vaccine uptake has been directly linked to outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases.

Rubella itself is caught up fairly directly, as it's included in the MMR vaccine, which Andrew Wakefield did such a great job of attacking back in the 1990s, before evolving into a full-on antivaccine cult leader.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@papigiulio

I heard you can actually choose where you want that the be placed. Doesn't always have to be shoulder. Anyway will find out next week when the little one gets her shots.

Its not that simple actually. It will ONLY be covered under health insurance if it is done on the upper arm, and the front obvious part of it, because it has not been proven to be as effective if you do it on other areas of the body.

That being said, you CAN get it done of you pay for it, but you need to find a doctor willing to do it. Lucky for those who live in Tokyo

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Catch a train in any major city during morning or evening peak hour and you've got your answer as to why it spreads so easily

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Mitch Benn sums up vaccination in song.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2woBNxrDQA

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That is just the TB vaccination. There was a test done in India and 60% of those vaccinated still contracted TB. The only effective way to control TB is by isolation. However, the vaccine for rubella is effective and does stop people contracting the disease, but only if it’s used.

Not sure what you mean by 60% of those vaccinating catching TB - do you actually mean that 60% of all people vaccinated against TB get TB? Obviously not, but not sure what you actually mean.

TB was a farily common illness in the West until vaccination largely wiped it out. It has re-emerged slightly, but largely among immigrant communities, such as recent arrivals from the Indian sub-continent.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Link for the article:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gerganakoleva/2012/07/02/what-recent-measles-and-rubella-outbreaks-in-europe-can-teach-the-u-s/#4ecf3b533e67

0 ( +0 / -0 )

http://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/07/02/national-measles-warning-five-fold-rise-cases-england/&sa=U&ved=2ahUKEwj87fC5vcndAhWys4sKHW51BoQQFjAAegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw0nTOIQ22b14CNhHZoDTUOt

0 ( +0 / -0 )

May be time for people to start washing their hands when the leave the toilet...

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Another reason it’s best to avoid public transport. 50 people packed together like sardines is a recipie for contagion.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Certainly in my case the Doctor offered to place it on my kids bottom or sole of the foot.

At the clinic, sure. But if it's done at school?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I heard you can actually choose where you want that the be placed. Doesn't always have to be shoulder.

When they are ramming the kids through like cattle, do you really think the kids can choose? I'd highly doubt it.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

You'd think the hideous trackmarks the vaccinations here leave would indicate their are objecting people with every vaccination at once.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

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