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Santa takes gourmet dinner to nuclear evacuees

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More than two years after the event; in a country supposedly advanced as Japan, for a country as rich as Japan ... and we are still doling out charity to these people. In reality nothing has been done for them. After all the time, money and effort spent on the Olympics ... I am truly disappointed in the way we have treated our fellow citizens in the Fukushima.

21 ( +21 / -1 )

That is nice for the Evacuees and sad at the same time. They will be spending another holiday in the School/Shelter where they are housed. Hopefully J Govt will wake up one day SOON and decide to pay these folks for their homes in the contaminated areas and allow them to move on...

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Utrack - they're not in schools or shelters but temporary houses.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

@Heda_Madness

Some are in Temporary houses NOT all. Google Evacuees at the Kisai High School in Saitama Prefecture and see the 100+ senior evacuees who are paying for each meal and still living in card board boxes.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Not a word so far about the actual story?

Good on these guys for their selfless and exemplary behaviour. If there is such a thing as God or Karma, etc, I hope they are rewarded somehow. Then again, maybe the gratitude and knowledge what they are doing is reward enough.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Well, this story was with regards to the evacuees in Fukushima, who aren't living in shelters/schools. As for the elderly residents of Kisai High School, I am aware of that, however it's a very small minority of those who were displaced. And I believe that the reason that they are in the shelter is because they want to be with their friends and not spread out to temporary houses (which are not full).

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

I've heard of molecular gastronomy, but subatomic gastronomy is taking it too far.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@Heda_Madness

The Evacuees at the Kisai High School in Saitama Prefecture, They want to go home. They seem to me from reading their story to be lost and alone even with so many.. The food they have to purchase is substandard, Onigiri was a food the evacuees chose to save extra for later, when folks came and made them a meal. There is shame I felt the evacuees feel in the way they are living that choked my throat when I read how it is for them. So read their story before you generalize the plight of a group.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

A simple act of kindness like this reminds me a true Christmas spirit; JOY-LOVE-PEACE. Thank you guys!!

7 ( +7 / -0 )

The Evacuees at the Kisai High School in Saitama Prefecture, They want to go home. They seem to me from reading their story to be lost and alone even with so many.. The food they have to purchase is substandard, Onigiri was a food the evacuees chose to save extra for later, when folks came and made them a meal. There is shame I felt the evacuees feel in the way they are living that choked my throat when I read how it is for them. So read their story before you generalize the plight of a group.

You sure? It seems they don't want to leave.

http://sankei.jp.msn.com/region/news/130911/stm13091112590000-n1.htm

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

I agree with Globalwatcher, it is a simple, selfless act of kindness for the people of Fukushima. Is there more we all can do?? Yes! Is there more that the Japanese government can do or should be doing or should have done?? Yes, but they do have the mess with the nuclear radiation, not knowing what will happen, when will they get hit again by the next big quakes and horrible tsunamis etc..so back to being nice, friendly and trying to spread a bit of the Christmas cheer, we all need it! So happy holidays!

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Readers, please keep the discussion focused on the “Caravan Bon Appetite” initiative.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Goof for them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@nigelboy

The French Embassy has done a good thing and every year since the accident at Daiichi. I can not read Nihon so I don't understand the link you give... Happy Holidays

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The French Embassy has done a good thing and every year since the accident at Daiichi. I can not read Nihon so I don't understand the link you give... Happy Holidays

Utrack.

The news I linked is the Futaba Mayor basically pleading the remaining residents to vacate for even a single soul who decides to remain, the high school building has to cater to that individual. As Heda alluded to, there is a reason why certain residents decided to stay there and it's not as a result of lack of options.

And yes. I agree with wholeheartedly that the support from overseas, whether it be governmental, groups, or individuals have been tremendous.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

@nigelboy

Some evacuees just want to go home, which is the case here. but home is not an option...

1 ( +4 / -3 )

As Nigel said. They want to stay as part of the community, with friends. That they can't go home is a terrible tragedy. Just like it is for all of the evacuees from Iwate, Miyagi and of course Fukushima. They want to close that shelter but it's the residents that are preventing it being closed.

So yes, Utrack, I'm well aware of their story. Now I presume that you've been up there to donate some of your time and help them with some food? I'm presuming that you've directly helped them yourself. And as such I understand why you feel so much sorrow for that particular group. As I do with those from all of the areas that I drove supplies to.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I hope the Yaks found it in their harts to put money forward for this.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Heda_Madness

I have my own campaigns for the evacuees on indiegogo. I am not so old nor bitter as not to help where I can even here in the states.. So stop with the accusing it is sad..

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I wasn't accusing you at all. I was merely presuming that because you were passionate about this one, small, group of displaced people that it must have been from first hand knowledge. In the same way I'm passionate about the people of Kesennuma, Rikuzentakata, Minami Soma etc. Because of my first hand experience with them.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Santa does what the JP government is not capable of doing.

0 ( +2 / -1 )

Precisely. Well done Santa!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

This is truly some heartwarming news at this time of year. It's wonderful that these people are being cared for, and shows that Japan does indeed have international help in dealing with the Fukushima situation.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"When Santa arrived at a school hosting children who fled Japan's nuclear disaster, he brought the usual presents, but he also bore something a little less ordinary -gourmet Christmas dinner." All the events and ideas are great, but I wish they didn't call it "Christmas" dinner. Christmas has nothing to do with Japanese culture, Japanese government, Japanese kids, and Japanese schools. I wish they called it something more deeply related to the traditional Japanese culture. The name is so fake and it just promotes American commercialism.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

God bless Caravan Bon Appetite now and forever. Amen.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

SpeaklikeGandhi,

Christmas is not a Japanese tradition but that doesn't mean that the Japanese don't understand it. You can't put into words the look, the smile, of the Japanese children when we knocked on their doors on their temporary houses on Christmas Eve with Christmas Presents. They knew what Christmas was. They knew who Santa is. And they know what compassion is.

It's not a Japanese culture but it also doesn't have to have anything to do with commercialism.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

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