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15 people injured in 20-vehicle expressway pileup in western Japan

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That's sad. Hope this will be solved soon.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

I always worry about getting rammed like that while waiting for the light on the ramp from the Higashi Kyoto exit from Meishin Expy. The ramp is a big curve, creating a total blind spot. Fortunately, people can't go too fast, as they're coming out of the toll booths right before it. But, those big trucks can still cause a lot of damage, even at moderate speeds.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

2 fast 2 furious

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Road design in Japan is terrible. Roads like this need to be designed from the driver's point of view. Traffic lights are used far too much here. Roundabouts are much safer. In the U.K. most motorways exit onto a roundabout.

More roundabouts please!

1 ( +14 / -13 )

Texting, Chatting, or talking on the G O phone!! or none of the above!

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

To any Japanese reading this. Minimum 3 car lengths between you and the car infront. Also indicated before reaching the turning.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Just a question of time now till it is revealed that the driver was 86 years old

-12 ( +1 / -13 )

Drivers of tankers are never 86 years old.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Frankly, I'm surprised there aren't more accidents in japan considering how people don't pay attention.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

Kobe White Bar OwnerToday  06:19 pm JST

To any Japanese reading this. Minimum 3 car lengths between you and the car infront. Also indicated before reaching the turning.

-2( +1 / -3 )

Literally I'm in shock that you are in the hole ( at this point ) for an extremely honest and truthful observation.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

警察は、タンクローリーを運転していた40代の男性を過失運転傷害の疑いで調べています。

Tanker driver in his 40s apparently. (Says he was hit from behind by another truck…)

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@ Randy such is life mate. The truth always stings the weak and hyper sensitive.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Luckily no bikes waiting in line. Always leave space for bikes to get through in lines. We're not just trying to get to the front, we're also trying to get as far away from the back as possible - it's the most dangerous place.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

BertieWoosterToday  05:51 pm JST

Road design in Japan is terrible. Roads like this need to be designed from the driver's point of view. Traffic lights are used far too much here. Roundabouts are much safer. In the U.K. most motorways exit onto a roundabout.

More roundabouts please!

 There's a good reason there are so many traffic lights, especially in Kansai. Most traffic lights in Osaka, for example, are in tandem: one set and 200 metres up the road, another set. Why? Because Kansai drivers are notorious for jumping red lights and before this system came in, it used to be a real problem.

As for roundabouts- Lord no. With the many crazy truckers, bosozoku and boy racers, they would be a disaster, of that I'm sure.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Japanese can't drive.

Running red lights

Tailgating

Not indicating when turning

The list goes on.

This is inspite of the "rigorous" off street training and testing.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

Japanese can't drive.Running red lights

Tailgating

Not indicating when turning

Yes, drivers in other countries NEVER do these things. They ONLY happen in Japan. Right?

&npsp;

...right?

5 ( +8 / -3 )

@Strangerland nobody said it's ONLY in Japan. But it's definitely true that it's very common in Japan.

You see people running red lights every day, it's that common. Indicating before actually turning also didn't make it to Japan, not sure if people want to save their indicator light bulbs or what.

I strongly stand behind Japanese highways being dangerous by design in many places and also Japanese drivers not knowing how to drive on them. This despite all the training and having to sit through info sessions when renewing a license.

If Japanese police, for a change, did something about enforcing the traffic laws, the situation might look a bit different.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

@Strangerland nobody said it's ONLY in Japan. But it's definitely true that it's very common in Japan.

Yes, we all know this almost never happens overseas and is extremely rare. People from every other country almost always never run red-lights, tailgate, nor forget to indicate when turning. It's clearly a Japanese problem.

 

...right?

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@0rei0 roundabouts work and are safer than stop sign or traffic lights, that's a fact. Europeans know that and so you'll find them everywhere.

They would make the traffic more fluid, slow down and stop the issue of red lights. Nearby my building, there's a busy stroad, where the traffic lights are also every 200–300 meters or so. Yet this does not stop idiots speeding through a red light only to stop a bit ahead anyway.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I dont know if it is a petrol tanker or a non hazerdious tanker truck, i hope its a non hazerdious tanker, when petrol tanker get into a collision and the tanks ruptured its a Big Bang.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@h0nz4

Don't get me wrong, I think roundabouts work very well... in Europe: They don't quite have the problem Japan has with bosozoku and boy racers who NEVER slow down or stop, even for the police (maybe especially not for) who have all but given up chasing them.

In Osaka every weekend they're out racing and they clearly don't give a damn about their own or anyone else's safety: roundabouts would only provide more of a challenge to them. And trucks just charge around the city like it's a race track.

I also don't believe Japanese drivers, on the whole(but not everbody) have the patience for roundabouts and they'd probably lead to more accidents: You made the point yourself- People still frequently jump the lights, so I don't think the root of the problem is which system is best.

As with the traffic lights, I didn't really make myself clear. The authorities pretty much know people will jump the first set but will have to stop at the second set, which are often before major junctions or crossroads.

What is needed is REAL driving test in Japan, not the paper mockery they currently have, in order to root out more of those who clearly shouldn't be on the roads.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@StrangerlandJ it's not a Japanese problem but it's most certainly a problem in Japan, yes. Sorry to break it to you.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Roundabouts would work well for bozosoku. Try going round one at 100kph and see what happens! Roundabouts naturally force people to slow down. The only difficulty people have with roundabouts is the large two or three lane ones. If a driver doesn't have the confidence to go round a one lane roundabout, he shouldn't be behind the wheel.

There should be better tests that is true, but prior to that there needs to be instruction and a logically laid out course. At the driving school I attended in Musashi Sakai, many of the instructors read from the manual - the same manual as we all had on our desks and, when he came to a particularly meaty sentence, he would write it - exactly as he had said it and as it was in the text book in front of us - on the white board.

Poor instruction and poor road design are behind many of these accidents. These things could be corrected.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kobe White Bar Owner

To any Japanese reading this. Minimum 3 car lengths between you and the car infront. Also indicated before reaching the turning.

You are 1,000% right in this comment! I always try to keep at least a 2 car length distance between me and the car in front of me, but other drivers would see that as a "free space" and swoop in WITHOUT indicators (most times) thus minimizing my window for reaction time in case of an emergency.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

it's not a Japanese problem but it's most certainly a problem in Japan, yes

Are there any countries roughly equivalent to Japan where it is not a problem?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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