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Some foreigners in Aichi feeling concern over spread of virus

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So basically, some foreigners have the same concerns as everybody else. What an eye opening article.

33 ( +34 / -1 )

I wish I had a time machine so I could go back and not read this article.

28 ( +29 / -1 )

Well, I never...

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I’m a foreigner in Aichi and my main concern is that nobody else in Aichi seems concerned.

26 ( +26 / -0 )

Effective March 6, the government covers the entire cost of a PCR exam for those enrolled in one of the national health schemes. This information is available from numerous sources by searching for PCR検査自己負担.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

So they’re blaming foreigners for not voicing their concerns more to a council that doesn’t have any non Japanese speaking staff and extremely limited resources for helping foreigners.

How very Japanese

11 ( +21 / -10 )

Yes, many foreign residents share their concerns. As I posted under another story yesterday I found at a local city hall in Osaka on Friday I the only information/guidelines regarding Coronavirus I could see displayed was a poster asking if I visited Wuhan or Hubei province in China in the last two weeks and a phone number to call if I had and was feeling flu like symptoms.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Vince BlackToday  05:06 pm JST

So they’re blaming foreigners

No one's "blaming" anybody.

0 ( +10 / -10 )

@BNiigata

We get it. You read Japanese. Very impressive.

5 ( +15 / -10 )

What about learning the language of your host country?

-8 ( +10 / -18 )

Hello, i am another foreigner living in Nagoya, feeling concern about coronavirus. Already a lot of people died allover Europe and seems that nobody in Japan is worried about how much (especially) elderly people will die unless appropiate measures are put in place.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Juliana Nishi, a 34-year-old Brazilian living in Nagoya, worries that her son may start losing some of his Japanese skills as his school, along with others throughout Japan, has been closed since early March.

Oh hell....If this woman's son looses his "Japanese skills" in less than one month, there are other problems in the home that are not being shared here!

You dont lose language "skills" in one month in the country you are living in, if you had any in the first place!

Sorry, but this sounds like BS!

5 ( +13 / -8 )

Talk about being concerned! I’m down in Miyazaki, and it’s business as usual. I’m in contact with a few hundred kids on a weekly basis, as well as my wedding celebrate work.

Are people turning a blind eye to what’s happening around the world, and now Japan, or are they just so gullible, misguided or showing lack of common sense.?

lucky I have waves at my front door to Have daily surf and relieve my stress!

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Although he can find information such as the number of infections by prefecture, he says urgent questions that directly impact him remain unanswered -- what to do if he thinks he is infected, the cost of a virus test, and whether foreigners are treated equally as Japanese people.

This article is looking to stir crap up, just like what happened after the earthquake and tsunami!

Folks need to take a deep breathe! If you have insurance, Japanese health insurance, your medical needs will be taken care of. If you dont have the insurance, you shouldnt be here anyway!

If you are also worried about being "treated the same as Japanese" WHY ARE YOU HERE!

This article is looking to bash Japan about how foreigners are treated!

2 ( +12 / -10 )

What about learning the language of your host country?

Many ( most? ) foreigners don’t stay very long in Japan. Some like me were transferred here, some are the spouses of those working here, others do working holidays etc. Some have just arrived.

How quickly did you master Japanese?

7 ( +18 / -11 )

What about learning the language of your host country?

How long do you have to have been here to even read PCR検査自己負担. let alone search for it?

And what percentage of foreigners here in Japan have been here that long?

Unless you are Chinese, the actual number will be pretty small.

9 ( +14 / -5 )

What a nonsense article.

everyone should be concerned!

as a "foreigner" in Japan for 20 years I've learned to get needed information from elsewhere. Especially with major global concerns. Same was true in 2011.

Local is local and info is different.

but news blackouts are par for the course here.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

love how this article subtly pushes the "us and them' mantra.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

here in Tokyo we are feeling massive concern because Japanese Ministry of Education (oxymoron) ignoramuses want my and all kids to return to school in April because they haven't learned how to use online teaching applications and Japanese officials are incapable of change.

6 ( +13 / -7 )

How quickly did you master Japanese?

What an asinine comment! It's not about "mastering" Japanese, it's about knowing how to take care of ones self in a foreign country!

If you cant, you shouldnt be here!

1 ( +13 / -12 )

How quickly did you master Japanese?

What an asinine comment! It's not about "mastering" Japanese, it's about knowing how to take care of ones self in a foreign country!

Isn’t being able to accurately read or listen to extremely important information during a health emergency useful in taking care of yourself?

I tend to read the box before taking medicine. Maybe it’s just me.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

Are foreigners through their connection with their country of origin perhaps more aware of how bad this could get and concerned at the lack of official action and information?

8 ( +8 / -0 )

A sign of the times story that manages to always miss the simple fact that any society, systems or governments, by their very nature, must cater to the majority first. How can they not? To start screaming bloody Mary and playing silly identity politics, which was a side sport when things were going well is just well, daft.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Everyone should be concerned. In the U.S. there were only 69 cases on March 1st. As of March 28th, there were 118,00 cases. April's projections are... jaw dropping. Nightmarish.

This disease spreads like wildfire once it gets going.

How many cases does japan have right now?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Typo: 118,000

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If you live in Aichi Prefecture (愛知県) and are looking for information about the new coronavirus, including the availability of consultation services, it's here: 愛知県新型コロナウイルス相談窓口

The information provided is currently available only in Japanese, but as a reference or resource, it is better than nothing. (Rendering the above into kana or romaji would be useless for search purposes. For other prefectures, replace the Aichi-ken bit, obviously.)

These situations can be frustrating (at the least) to expats who lack ready access to official information in their native language and are unable to navigate Japanese.

Consider asking a Japanese friend or colleague for help.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

If you cant, you shouldnt be here

you said the same about health insurance. Sorry boy, but that ain’t your decision

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Typo: 118,000

It'll be 140,000 by the end of the day in the US.

And a million by the end of next month.

Europe could be just as bad.

And now the numbers are picking up in Japan, just as all the schools are about to start.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

And now the numbers are picking up in Japan, just as all the schools are about to start.

The world is perplexed and scratches it’s head by this as well.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

'Some like me were transferred here, some are the spouses of those working here,'

Excuses, excuses and more excuse.

If you live in country X, it's your obligation to speak the language; no allowances.

English is a requirement for immigration into Britain; Japan should demand the same from all gaijin. Regardless.

Simples

2 ( +10 / -8 )

I'm concerned, but not about the lack of information, there is lots (so long as you look at both national and foreign news and not just the former or latter), and if you know where to look you can find more. Granted, it DOES help to know the local language, but that's no excuse for the lack of support that is noted time and time again between disasters, but never seems to be addressed beyond stating that it exists.

Now, all that aside, my biggest concern is that people here don't generally seem very concerned at all. They DID about two weeks ago, but that seems to have settled into a general complacence and feeling that the urgency to take care has passed. It's not going to come back until the government slams down an order to shut things down, and that won't come until it's too late anyway.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Many ( most? ) foreigners don’t stay very long in Japan. Some like me were transferred here, some are the spouses of those working here, others do working holidays etc. Some have just arrived.

How quickly did you master Japanese?

It doesn't matter for how long or why someone's staying here. It's the responsibility of the the guest to adapt to their host country, even if it's for a short period of time. Knowing basic phrases of the local lingo will go a long way anywhere in the world and btw it took me about half a year to get consersational, why?

How long do you have to have been here to even read PCR検査自己負担. let alone search for it?

And what percentage of foreigners here in Japan have been here that long?

You don't have to know complicated kanji, as long as you know basic conversational Japanese you can always call your local 市役所 or hospital and they will point you in the right direction.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

It doesn't matter for how long or why someone's staying here. It's the responsibility of the the guest to adapt to their host country, even if it's for a short period of time. Knowing basic phrases of the local lingo will go a long way anywhere in the world and btw it took me about half a year to get consersational, why?

So how about people who’ve been here for three months? Should they studying twice as hard as you did?

Basic phrases don’t help when you need accurate information about a medical emergency. I’m not saying people shouldn’t study the language or try to adapt, but this blanket ‘everyone should speak the language’ for newcomers is plain idiotic.

You couldn’t speak the language when you arrived. It took you half a year to get conversational. A bit slow but you got there.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Vince BlackToday  05:06 pm JST

“So they’re blaming foreigners for not voicing their concerns more to a council that doesn’t have any non Japanese speaking staff and extremely limited resources for helping foreigners. 

How very Japanese”

What council are you referring to? This one?

“The Aichi Multicultural Center in Nagoya, which advises residents in 11 foreign languages”

Invalid CSRF

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I've been studying Japanese for hours a day, every day, for many years, but still can't remember even the most basic words. My lack of ability has made me seriously depressed at times, and it's only because I'm so stubborn that I keep going with it. I drill basic words and sentences for hours a day, saying them out loud, copying them out, over and over, and use online SRS systems too, but nothing ever sticks. I've tried having conversations in Japanese with people, but can't even say a few words before either it switches to English or we just give up. I'd take lessons, but I can't afford them. My brain is just not wired for languages.

And then I read people here say that they think I ought to speak Japanese (the most difficult language in the world) in order for me to live here with my family. Part of me understands what they are saying, but I'm so glad they don't have any political power as I'm sure they like to separate me from my loved ones simply because I'm not good at this particular skill.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

El Rata: "It doesn't matter for how long or why someone's staying here. It's the responsibility of the the guest to adapt to their host country,"

Wrong. It is the responsibility of the host to take care of the guest, especially when they have asked them to come, and we know full well the government has been seeking an influx of foreign tourism and white color workers (as well as nurses, etc.). Now, should the guest choose to no longer be a guest and become a part of the household (assuming they are welcome), then I believe it is beneficial to all if they do indeed do their best to adapt and learn, but that does not exclude them from receiving help. And lest we forget, this nation is DESPERATE to house the Olympic Games, and even before its postponement there were countless articles about how there is not enough info for foreign guests, especially on what to do in the event of an emergency. It is not at all their responsibility to suddenly learn Japanese so they can pay to visit.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

@smithinJapan 100% correct. You'd think by now Japan would provide English/Japanese for all Government Communications simultaneously... just like in the US English/Spanish...

0 ( +6 / -6 )

@Tokyo-m

Good post. Ignore the types who like to speak generally on subjects like this. They are very unhelpful and I get the feeling some aren’t as good as they think they are ( posting kanji can be a bit cringeworthy ).

My wife is amazed that my ear isn’t as tuned as hers despite the fact I’ve been playing guitar for over 30 years. I play her songs she’s never heard before and she nails the melody on the piano after one or two listenings.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Now, all that aside, my biggest concern is that people here don't generally seem very concerned at all. They DID about two weeks ago, but that seems to have settled into a general complacence and feeling that the urgency to take care has passed. 

I think that the problem was that the government used a big gun too early. Closing schools when there were hardly any cases and then talking about re-opening them gives the signal that the crisis has been dealt with.

Numbers are now picking up again, into the 10% day-on-day territory, which may make it hard to control.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

What about learning the language of your host country?

well if your one of the many foreigner that are here on temporary work visas which means you'll have to leave after 5 yrs with no chance of gaining permanent residency, where is the incentive and why would you bother

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Wtfjapan

Are you talking about those "trainee visas", mostly issued to people from SE Asia? In which case, I agree. It's exploitative and needs to change.

For most westerners (I'm assuming you are western) on a normal work visa or professor visa, you could get your visa extended when you get another contract. Or just apply for permanent residence, of get married....

I know people who have been here years as teachers and just keep renewing their visas each time.

There are a myriad of possibilities.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

well if your one of the many foreigner that are here on temporary work visas which means you'll have to leave after 5 yrs with no chance of gaining permanent residency, where is the incentive and why would you bother

Where is the incentive? Communicating with the locals. Why would you bother? So you don't live in a bubble where you're like an adult baby, needing to get help to do any adulting.

Anyone can become somewhat fluent in a language with five years. I myself was conversational within a year of moving to Japan. Had I been here on a five year visa, that would have left me with four years of ability to converse with the people I was living amongst, vs. five years of adult baby-hood had I not bothered to study.

And it's not like you need to study for a year and suddenly you get benefit. Every little bit you learn is then something you can go out and use in the real world. While there are some plateaus in learning a language, where suddenly you hit a point where you don't feel you are progressing, those are not the norm. The norm is that every bit of studying results in easier communication.

And let's look at this a different way. If you decide to move to a country, live there, but don't bother to learn to communicate, you are creating a burden on the locals every time you walk into an establishment and force them to communicate with you. If you're a tourist, that's fine - it's ridiculous to expect tourists to be able to pick up any kind of fluency on a trip (unless it's for months). If you live here though, you're creating a burden on society. It's socially irresponsible to live in a culture and not actively work on being able to communicate in the lingo of the land. There are countries where this is an exception - think Holland and Finland, where pretty much everyone speaks English at an advanced level. But for most countries, if you live there, can't communicate, and aren't working on improving your language abilities, and aren't hiring a full-time translator, you're being socially irresponsible.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

My last two posts were:

1) Talking about responsibility for learning the language

2) The Japanese want foreigners here and have set up a system to allow foreigners to live and work here.

To bring those two posts together, I think the host nation and foreign residents have mutual obligations to each other. Foreign residents to work on learning Japanese, and the host nation putting together a system to assist those who have not yet learned.

Many who come here only come for a year - expecting them to have the level of fluency required to navigate this situation in Japanese isn't reasonable. Therefore, as the host nation, the Japanese governments should be supporting their foreign residents. There should be a consolidated effort to get them information in English, and community support if they require it. That's especially in these times, but really, it's something they should always be doing.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

you said the same about health insurance. Sorry boy, but that ain’t your decision

Sorry son, but you are wrong on that too. Japan requires, everyone to be enrolled in a health insurance scheme. And if you just got off the boat, it wont cost much of anything either, if you enroll in the national health scheme, as the premiums are based upon your prior year's income.

It's a freaking no brainer to NOT have health insurance, of some type or another, when you live anywhere abroad!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Some foreigners in Aichi feeling concern over spread of virus.

Everyone in the World is concerned over spread of the virus.

fixed

0 ( +0 / -0 )

To bring those two posts together, I think the host nation and foreign residents have mutual obligations to each other. Foreign residents to work on learning Japanese, and the host nation putting together a system to assist those who have not yet learned.

but the thing foreign trainees dont have any option to work towards permanent residency, even if you marry a Japanese national many employers will terminate your employment because they dont want to pay the associated costs of family pay allowances. Im not saying your shouldnt know basic Japanese but if your future is uncertain in Japan and the government really has no desire for you to stay permanantly why should they demand you have good proficiency. Many foreigners could be an asset to Japanese society long term but ghe government and the culture really has no desire to see that happen. So trainees will continue to be a source of cheap labour nothing more nothing less.

Whether thats good or bad is debatable

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Im not saying your shouldnt know basic Japanese but if your future is uncertain in Japan and the government really has no desire for you to stay permanantly why should they demand you have good proficiency.

They shouldn't need to demand. It's an obligation for those who come to a country in which they don't speak the language. Japan shouldn't have to demand (and doesn't for that matter). But anyone living in this country who cannot speak and isn't actively working on fixing that, is not living up to their obligation as an immigrant to this country.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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