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Suicide revives concerns about Japan immigration detention

33 Comments
By Harumi Ozawa and Sara Hussein

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33 Comments
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Why on earth would anyone in their right mind choose Japan to seek asylum? It's a sure way of getting yourself locked up perpetually. When it comes to helping genuine refugees, Japan is selfish, and yet it has been a nation which has sent out a hoard of migrants to the Americas. Yes, there are a lot of people masquerading as refugees, but not for one minute do I believe the real ones numbered about 20 in one year.

1 ( +13 / -12 )

The government need to look how the life for the detainees can be improved especially with medical supervision and to speed up the length of time to be deported. Should happen at least within 12 months. In the early part of the last century until the 1960's/70's there were hundreds of thousands of economical Japanese emigrants to South America including Brazil, Mexico, Peru and also Hawaii. Those emigrants far outnumber the immigrants into Japan.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

It revived concern:

a) to the world outside Japan, particularly people concerned with human rights.

b) to Japanese who worry how his will affect how they are perceived by (a)

It most certainly does not concern immigration officials here, politicians in general, or your average Joe Tanaka, either, if anyone aside from (b).

5 ( +12 / -7 )

He didn't do anything wrong.

He has challenged the authority and did not leave.

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

You could get round this by shipping all these chancers’ sorry backsides off to their country of origin quick march.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

When it comes to helping genuine refugees, Japan is selfish

Japanese taxpayers donated $152,000,000 to the UN refugee agency in 2017. They are the 4th largest donor in the world.

It's also worth remembering that the vast majority of the 65+ million genuine refugees in the world do not have enough money to be able to buy a plane ticket and get a visa to Japan. The ones who make it here are already an extremely privileged minority amongst asylum seekers. If Japan ever decides to take in larger numbers of refugees, it would be hard to justify allowing those with money to push their way to the front of the line at the expense of those in UNHCR camps. The entire global asylum system is in need of rationalisation and reform.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

He has challenged the authority and did not leave.

I thought that there was a right of appeal in Japan.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Why should Japan be taking in refugees when there are so many of their own people homeless and "sleeping rough"

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

Why should Japan be taking in refugees when there are so many of their own people homeless and "sleeping rough"

Because Japan has signed up to the UN Convention for refugees.

(I would have thought that the issue of homeless people is dealt with by each local government authority).

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

Nobody deserve year in prison followed by death simply for landing on a country without a visa.

You just send them back next flight.

This?! This is barbarism, plain and simple.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

yes very poor conditions pick a different country to go to

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Instead of keeping them languishing in detention centers, why not just send them back right away if authorities don't want them in Japan?

Every country has a right to determine what is best for them in terms of immigration and 'refugees.' But I do agree it is not right to keep anyone in limbo. Just send them back quickly, problem solved.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Refugees=source of criminals.

Don't mix them up with immigrants, and by immigrants I mean highly skilled professionals, who can and will adopt to the host country's culture.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

No such thing as refugees coming to Japan; it's a geographical impossibility. Only economic migrants.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

"Kumar appears to have committed suicide after learning that his provisional release request had been denied"

Interesting, he picked death rather than going back to his country. What does that say?

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Nobody deserve year in prison followed by death simply for landing on a country without a visa.

Look from Japan's perspective.

He should have come to Japan with a visa like other Indians. But somehow he tried a asylum.  He was denied but selfishly did not leave. Japan had to provide him with meals/accommodation/care for free as long as a year. That's not small tax money. Then his suicide. But his brother did not say a word of sorry or thank you, instead, "We don't believe the authorities and demand that his death be investigated,"

Is it fair?

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Japan had to provide him with meals/accommodation/care for free as long as a year. 

Yes, a year is a long t time. Bad for everyone. I think that more judges are required, in order to speed up the process and final decision.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Just DUMP them on the USA; everyone ELSE does....or Europe.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

"We respect their human rights," said Daisuke Akinaga, an official at the Ushiku facility.

A complete lie - Japan is globally infamous for not respecting human rights of Japanese or foreigners. Crime victims are not invited to court hearings, police often lie in reports and victims have no recourse, detainees are denied basic right from the get-go, can be kept 23 days or even longer with no visitor allowed, during which police deprive them of sleep, force them to do filthy manual labor, conduct round the clock interrogations, suddenly come into cell at 0200 take away bedding and force detainee to stand in center of cell - no human right in Japan so we are to believe this clown? gimme a break

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Even though japan is a signatory to the U N Refugee Convention they very wisely did not stipulate how many (if any) they would take. Other countries, such as Australia, which is taking 17000 his year, have made and are making rods for their own backs---financially and especially in Australia's case, social and law enforcement problems. Perhaps Japan insists that refugee applicants prove beyond all doubt that they are genuine refugees ---which would separate the sheep from the goats.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Nobody comes to Japan on a plane as a refugee, they are liers, just económic immigrant cheaters.. Send them back to their countries, Japan doesn't need you !!.. Sorry, no bonus..

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

It revived concern:

a) to the world outside Japan, particularly people concerned with human rights.

b) to Japanese who worry how his will affect how they are perceived by (a)

It most certainly does not concern immigration officials here, politicians in general, or your average Joe Tanaka, either, if anyone aside from (b).

That pretty much sums it up.

Nobody deserve year in prison followed by death simply for landing on a country without a visa.

You just send them back next flight.

This?! This is barbarism, plain and simple.

exactly. Well said Bruno.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Yes, a year is a long t time. Bad for everyone. I think that more judges are required, in order to speed up the process and final decision.

These people appeal many times.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Either send them back quickly or treat them as human beings. Yes, I know deportation costs money, but so does 'food and accommodation', if you could call them that. It is sadistic to lock people up until they choose to commit suicide.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

political refugee from India? Seriously? with family here?

Enough with these lies!

Hopefully this will further highlight the simple fact that if you want to live in Japan - you need to go thru proper immigration procedure to be approved, and if not - tough luck!

Many people do, many expats do it properly and rightfully , cutting the line by claiming asylum will get you nowhere.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

"We respect their human rights," said Daisuke Akinaga, an official at the Ushiku facility.

A complete lie - Japan is globally infamous for not respecting human rights of Japanese or foreigners. Crime victims are not invited to court hearings, police often lie in reports and victims have no recourse, detainees are denied basic right from the get-go, can be kept 23 days or even longer with no visitor allowed, during which police deprive them of sleep, force them to do filthy manual labor, conduct round the clock interrogations, suddenly come into cell at 0200 take away bedding and force detainee to stand in center of cell - no human right in Japan so we are to believe this clown? gimme a break

macv- VERY GOOD POST! EXCELLENT!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Detention centres are exactly that ,designed to hold those who are in breach,in one way or another,of immigration regulations. They, and the staff who man them, are not there to mollycoddle and fuss over them night and day. The conditions in those centres are likely as not much better than what they had back in India or Africa where so many of them seem to come from. It's no coincidence surely,that those in Detention centres all over the world--Manus Island,Nauru,etc. all complain incessantly and loudly about the "dreadfull conditions".

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

seadog538

Detention centres are exactly that ,designed to hold those who are in breach,in one way or another,of immigration regulations. They, and the staff who man them, are not there to mollycoddle and fuss over them night and day. 

But compared with a country like the UK which have greater numbers of detentes they are not kept in cells without windows, are allowed outside the buildings and have much shorter times before being deported, usually 6-12 months.

https://londonhelp4u.co.uk/english/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/n.jpg

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@macv Today 05:46 am JST

Crime victims are not invited to court hearings, police often lie in reports and victims have no recourse, detainees are denied basic right from the get-go, can be kept 23 days

Haaa ... in your rush to condemn Japan, you just jumbled up the rights of victims and defendants, even though these are actually at cross purposes. Allowing crime victims to court hearings (beyond their witness testimony) is generally considered DISadvantageous to the defendant and criticized as unduly so. If you mean the police "lie" in reports in the direction of not arresting anyone, than in de facto terms the defendant's rights are preserved because they avoided arresting anyone. And if the victim "has no recourse", that again is beneficial to the defendant.

But then you turn around and complain about the defendant's rights? Remember that he's more likely to confess which will greatly simplify the trial, thus making this an advantage for the victim!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

zichi

In Japan, even criminals go out of the buildings.  Are you sure those in immigration ctr don't go out?

In the article above they don't complain about not going out so they probably do for exercise for instance.   

The picture of Japan's cell in another JT article had a window too.

UK maybe shorter time because of no appeals?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

tinawatanabe

zichi In Japan, even criminals go out of the buildings. Are you sure those in immigration ctr don't go out?

Small sectioned off cage with walls. Short visits. Inside there are common areas.

In the article above they don't complain about not going out so they probably do for exercise for instance.   

Their movement is controlled.

The picture of Japan's cell in another JT article had a window too.

Window to a corridor with no view of the outside world or even the sky.

UK maybe shorter time because of no appeals?

They have appeals but are conducted with greater speed.

http://www.immi-moj.go.jp/english/tetuduki/taikyo/syuuyou.html

https://www.globaldetentionproject.org/countries/asia-pacific/japan

1 ( +3 / -2 )

zichi,   6 to 12 months is not "greater speed" than Japan.   I don't see a big difference there.  No window or sky in the cell so what?  They are not asylum refugees and can go home. But when they go home I hope they say "Thank you for offering meals and accommodation and care" and "Sorry to cause you so much trouble".

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

tinawatanabe: "In the article above they don't complain about not going out so they probably do for exercise for instance."

Yeah, you're right tina: I mean, when things are so horrible you commit suicide, that isn't really a complaint. When you are on a hunger strike, LITERALLY as a complaint, that isn't a complaint, is it?

""Thank you for offering meals and accommodation and care" and "Sorry to cause you so much trouble".

You mean when they go home dead? or when they go home to get killed because spineless and cowardly politicians here would rather see the population of this nation age and die than change the laws and accept refugees, saving their lives, like every other nation on the planet refugees aren't fleeing from?

No one should be thanked for treating others like sub-humans and prisoners, tina, and that's what Japan does with these people. And many of them canNOT go home; they fled, and stupidly chose a nation they thought was better than the one they left, and that might have an ounce of humanity. They were wrong.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

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