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Temperature hits record 41 degrees in Kochi

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I use a special deodorant. When you put it on, it feels really fresh straight away. It sells everywhere in Japan,” said Takenori Omori, a 27-year-old computer specialist.

I would TRULY appreciate it if you would PLEASE,PLEASE,PLEASE, share it with the rest of the people who have no idea that their body odor is strong enough to kill.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

I think he is talking about the Gatsby Ice - type deodorant, it's pretty awesome. Also you can get " Gatsby body sheets " that give you the same effect. Just make sure you get the " Ice" variety product, others are not as effective. Since I found out about these a couple of years ago I always use them on a hot day. Heaven sent.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The Gatsby Ice sheets are great. I find it amazing though that you still can't buy a decent deodorant stick in a country as humid as this.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

While I agree with you all about using deodorant, I'll have to admit a recent JT article caught my attention :

"Deodorant can cause breast cancer" (even men can get breast cancer...)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I have to have deodorant sent to me by the case here cause its so damn hot

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I suggest some are getting 'deodorant' confused with 'anti-antiperspirant'? There is plenty of deodorant (stops smells) in Japan, but due to use of metals (such as aluminum derivatives), anti-antiperspirant (stops sweating, by clogging pores) is harder to find. Importation seems to be the only way to obtain real antiperspirants...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

According to the Japan Pediatric Society, a lot of children are getting their hands burnt by touching hot metal that's directly under sunlight.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

How about baking soda as a deodorant? It's just perfect to stop bad smell (I swear) and as I understand is healthy. I used for a couple of weeks while my american deodorant were on their way.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

While I sympathize for everyone in the heat, do remember that sweating is a perfectly natural function - and SO necessary in these conditions. Most importantly, we should keep hydrated to avoid heatstroke. Let's cut some slack for everyone who gets "a bit damp"!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The low temperatures are what boggle my mind. 29, 30, even 32. Those are a far greater indicator of discomfort. I've been to places where it gets hot in the afternoon but cools in the mornings and nights, and there's a big, big difference from the merciless nature of a Japanese summer.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Although it's rather hot at the moment, there is good news in that the current solar maximum is peaking or past its peak, and experts anticipate a minimum possibly similar to the Maunder Minimum. http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/1112916734/solar-flip-expected-soon-080613/

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Guys, anti-perspirant is flat out wrong. Your body sweats because it NEEDS to, so imagine what happens when it needs to but cannot because of metals in the anti-perspirants. Sweating your butt off stinks, but there's nothing you can do about without making yourself sick. Keep hydrated, and while I don't really advocate the sports drinks because of all the sugar in them, the body needs some minerals as well.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

I use a special deodorant. When you put it on, it feels really fresh straight away. It sells everywhere in Japan,” said Takenori Omori, a 27-year-old computer specialist.

I would TRULY appreciate it if you would PLEASE,PLEASE,PLEASE, share it with the rest of the people who have no idea that their body odor is strong enough to kill.

LOL @Yubaru. I know the feeling!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@Smith Yeah, mobile phones can give you cancer, sitting and looking at a computer screen typing comments on a website can cause a whole host of maladies too. Get the deodorant on to show a bit of respect to those around you.@Roxana my mum used to put a few pinches of baking soda in my socks and shoes when I was a kid. I thought it was some old-wives tale, but I do it every day in summer now and it does make a hell of a difference. Great in a country where you need to take off your shoes so much.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I just don't get how people actually like summer in Kyushu. For me, June through October is just horrible. November is the best month on this island.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Jimizo: "@Smith Yeah, mobile phones can give you cancer, sitting and looking at a computer screen typing comments on a website can cause a whole host of maladies too. Get the deodorant on to show a bit of respect to those around you.@"

You miss the point, and I use deodorant by the way. It was ANTI-PERSPIRANT that I and others have said is not a good thing. And two other points about this heat and deodorant: 1) it's not sweat that smells, it's the bacteria on skin that gathers once you sweat and they break it down into acids. 2) as such you are going to sweat in 40 degree temperature irregardless of what you apply, and if you're out all day there's not a whole lot that deodorant is going to do to help you unless you bath in it and rub it all over your clothes, too. Baking soda, while quite as easy to spread, is indeed a decent alternative, and yes especially for shoes. Also good for brushing your teeth once in a while.

I gave up on the energy saving as well, more or less. Managed to tough it out until August but it's been too much lately, so I'm using the air-conditioner constantly when home.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@Jimizo: Thanks for the tip, I'll give it a try too. I knew summer in Japan was horrible, but never like this. I do agree about what other person said in here, the fact that even nights are hotter than in the day time, that is hell for me. I cant wait for autumn.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It is stale sweat that really smells, not fresh sweat. The guys stinking out the trains have not had a shower in the morning and have not changed their shirts from the day before. They could at least take a quick Aussis shower before riding public transport, but even this seems beyond them. They must not notice how bad they smell. 41 degrees is way too hot, but as long as the Japanese continue to fling down more concrete at such a rate of knots, the heat island effect will intensify.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I use a nature-friendly insect repellant that also feels cool. The brand's name is Perfect Potion. I also use a dry deo stick from Rexena. These are normally used mostly by women so maybe not a choice for the average Japanese macho.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Viking, the only article I've found in the Health archives under breast cancer is one about blood pressure meds increasing the risk of breast cancer, do you remember when that was? Most sources say the link between deoderant and breast cancer is pretty well debunked.

imagine what happens when it needs to but cannot because of metals in the anti-perspirants.

Your underarms are a very small percentage of your total skin area. I don't think that stopping underarm perspiration reduces the total amount you perspire enough to be dangerous.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

how terrible,hope everyone takes care about heat strokes..

1 ( +2 / -1 )

According to Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley, consumer spending increases by more than 100 billion yen if the average temperature (July-August) rises one degree.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Himajin: "Your underarms are a very small percentage of your total skin area. I don't think that stopping underarm perspiration reduces the total amount you perspire enough to be dangerous."

Well, the obvious answer to that comment is a question: why do you apply anti-persperant or what have you to that very small area, and pretty much that area alone? Another question, which hints at my point, why do humans have underarm hair?

But in case some don't get it -- there are a key few places from which the majority of heat is lost, or in the case of being in an extremely hot surrounding, where the heat from the body is released. These are the head, under the arms, and between the legs. You shut down any or all of that natural ventilation and you increase the chances of heat stroke by heaps.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Added to my hate list: NEVER visit Kochi (in the summer!). Osaka in the summer was horrible too!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

41 Celsius = 105.8 Fahrenheit

We've had 100+ degree weather here in South Texas for quite a few weeks now. You never get use to it (at least I don't). One big problem here: People leaving kids and pets in vehicles while they run into a store, etc., for "just a minute." ;-(

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You shut down any or all of that natural ventilation and you increase the chances of heat stroke by heaps

Do you have any proof that an antiperspirant on your underarms increased the chance of heat stroke? I'm still sweating like crazy from the rest of me, back, head, forehead, I don't think I'm sweat deficient.

Sweating too much and not drinking enough is the primary cause of heatstroke. The elderly don't sweat as much and so their body temp rises...they also lose the sense of thirst and can be very dehydrated without knowing it until too late.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Come to Okinawa, it's a cool 32 Degrees C here.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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