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Tens of thousands still without power in Hokkaido

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© 2012 AFP

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That sucks. I know how it feels when it's so cold and you don't have any heaters. :(

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Just imagine what can happen if a single power plant fails at peak use (by downed power lines or mechanical issue). We could see millions without power, since Hokkaido needs to have all it's plants running at some capacity for almost half the day (today's peak is 5.1GW on production of 5.8GW including Hakodate only lines from mainland, smallest power plants are about 150MW, but largest ones are close to 600MW, enough to instantly go below needed power during peak).

They should implement some sort of all-denka related blackout planning. i.e. cut power around noon if needed for all-denka, in exchange for 8pm-8am being guaranteed.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

It good to keep kerosene heaters and some fuel for use in emergencies, or gas portable heaters. We have a selection of heaters just in case we lose the source of one. The kerosene heaters are both the modern electric type and the older non electric type.

2 ( +3 / -2 )

So it was nothing to do with how power is generated or how much is generated. The transmission lines are the weakest link in a severe storm. Just look at how many times it happens in America very winter.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

All denka houses cannot use other heat sources because they will become CO2/CO deathtraps.

Transmission lines have everything to do with power production because there are only 5 plants transmitting power, and Sapporo alone uses half of it. A single offline plant by downed transmission or offline generator means blackout conditions to some part of Hokkaido

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

CO2/CO deathtraps?

Modern stoves produce less gas and easy enough to leave a window or door slightly open and there are also gas alarms but anyway better than freezing to death.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

the storm of 1997 was not fun here. 3 weeks before pwoer was restored and running gas back up. hope they get you lot fixed pretty quickly

0 ( +1 / -1 )

basroll:

All denka houses cannot use other heat sources because they will become CO2/CO deathtraps.

Not at all true.

I live in an all-electric house, with a wood stove - the wood stove has a chimney - the products of combustion go out through the chimney. And I can cook and keep warm even when the power's out.

No gas needed.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

ChikuyokeiNov. 28, 2012 - 09:25PM JST

I live in an all-electric house, with a wood stove

You DON'T live in an all-denka house. If you have a wood stove you don't have all-electric, you simply have mostly electric. You've stated two very different things in one place.

A vast majority of all-denka accommodations are apartments, which generally have three vents to the outside or less (above kitchen, in bathroom, usually intake vent elsewhere). You simply cannot use anything that burns inside these buildings without putting yourself and others in danger. Not to mention that it will cause deaths if the fire departments are holed up with hundreds of false alarms (or worse, managers that turn off alarms and then fires break out)

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Yeah, if you're in an apartment without power you are well and truly hosed. Poor people, it's got to be freezing in their homes. Misery.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Been there, done that.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

As has been said above, not advisable to put all your eggs in one basket, ie rely on one single power source. All-denka in Hokkaido sounds like a nightmare!

We have a choice of gas and gas/electric and non-electric kerosine/paraffin stoves, so there is usually something to fall back on. Kerosene works out to be the cheapest, but you need a draughty/drafty wood and paper house like ours to keep your carbon monoxide intake down.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

basroil

You DON'T live in an all-denka house. If you have a wood stove you don't have all-electric, you simply have mostly electric.

Actually, the house was built as all-electric. The wood stove and chimney and fireproof wall were added later as backup for use during power outages/extreme cold. It's definitely all-electric in the summer!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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