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TEPCO to build undersea tunnel to release Fukushima water; gov't to buy marine products

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So, we won’t see the water.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

the Japanese government said Tuesday it will buy marine products...

TEPCO should buy the products. Period.

the size and details of the envisaged fund are yet to be determined,

That's usually the case with slush funds.

19 ( +22 / -3 )

Government will buy the marine products...and what? Serve them in school lunches perhaps?

37 ( +37 / -0 )

Japan's rubric for the last 70-odd years.... if in doubt.... lay concrete....

30 ( +30 / -0 )

Of course they want to work closely with the pro-nuclear International Atomic Energy Agency. Wouldn't want any real critique of your plan from say, ecologists.

17 ( +18 / -1 )

The government will also instruct TEPCO to show a specific framework for compensation at an early date to work...

TEPCO.... compensation...early?

Sorry those words just don't go into the same sentence .. despicable TEPCO managment are still to this date denying payout claims to Daiichi disaster evacuees.

The government has said its decision to allow TEPCO to discharge the water poses no safety concerns, 

More lies from the govt. Never ending.

Japan also plans to work closely with organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency to increase transparency and international credibility.

Newsflash , LDP governments have zero redibility left.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

JeffLee  06:57 am JST

the Japanese government said Tuesday it will buy marine products...

TEPCO should buy the products. Period.

TEPCO’s majority shareholder is the Japanese government!

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings Inc plans to construct an approximately 1 kilometer-long undersea tunnel to release treated radioactive water from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant out to sea, sources close to the matter said Tuesday.

If it wasn't for the "...release treated radioactive water..."-part, one could read this as Tepco building a tunnel to have the radioactive water directly flow from the plant to the sea...(read: without treating it)

It will stretch 1 km east from the plant out to sea, releasing the water into an area of the ocean where no fishing rights are in place, according to the sources.

The area may have no fishing rights attached to it but the currents and weather will not let the radioactive water remain there...

TEPCO plans to dilute the treated water with a large amount of seawater to reduce its tritium concentration to less than 1,500 becquerels per liter. As the seawater within the nuclear plant's port area contains radioactive materials, the water will be taken from outside the port.

(Genuine) question: wouldn't it make more sense to load the radioactive water onto a re-wamped oil tanker and take it out to actual sea to achieve exactly this?

According to Wiki:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_tanker#:~:text=VLCC%20and%20ULCC,-Knock%20Nevis%20(1979&text=%22Supertankers%22%20are%20the%20largest%20oil,of%20oil%2F318%2C000%20metric%20tons.

quote:"Supertankers" are the largest oil tankers, and the largest man-made mobile structures. They include very large and ultra-large crude carriers (VLCCs and ULCCs – see above) with capacities over 250,000 DWT. These ships can transport 2,000,000 barrels (320,000 m3) of oil/318,000 metric tons.

unquote:

The government will offer thorough explanations over the safety of the treated water to businesses involved in processing, distribution and retailing of marine products in order to avoid prices of local marine products falling to unreasonably low levels.

Fixed to

The government will offer thorough explanations over the safety of the treated water to businesses involved in processing, distribution and retailing of marine products and just do as they (the government) pleases.

Neither convinced nor reassured by anything of the above and wondering how do prices tags for the solutions compare...

7 ( +8 / -1 )

so in other words..

sweep it under the rug

15 ( +17 / -2 )

How much will this cost the taxpayer? The ice wall around the reactor buildings cost ¥30 billion. So load the water onto tankers and take it out to sea.

The cost to date, ¥25 trillion. The final cost more than ¥80 trillion.

14 ( +14 / -0 )

So they think that this radioactive water is just going to stay in the area that does not have fishing rights, do they? Hhhhmmmm? Are they being serious? And another thing, buying fish products, and then what? Rename it as from Hokkaido and snick it in to our the food chain? Or are they going to make pet food and poison our pets?

8 ( +10 / -2 )

It doesn't matter where it comes out or how 'diluted' it is, Tepco (and thereby, Nihon) are STILL 'pooing' in the swimming pool that all the rest of us must use...and why should the People of Japan buy and pay for damaged goods, whether actual or "reputational", rather than the management and shareholders of Tepco whose foolish design is the most proximal CAUSE of this disaster? This is one of the worst aspects of Corporate ANYWHERE this form of corruption exists, that the main perps of disastrous Corporate error or even deliberate injury (see: Sacklers) somehow escape serious consequences for their actions, inactions, or serious failures of judgement.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

And another thing, buying fish products, and then what? Rename it as from Hokkaido and snick it in to our the food chain?

Well, it is kind of a tradition here.... relabeling and renaming, so...yeah.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

While the level of the radioactive substance tritium that remains in the treated water will be diluted to below regulatory standards,

No drama here..

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

It will stretch 1 km east from the plant out to sea, releasing the water into an area of the ocean where no fishing rights are in place, according to the sources.

Yeah, because the contaminated water will just stay there, and of course fish don’t move.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Is it safe the fish market will suffer as no one wants to eat Fukushima related nuclear contaminated sea food. Bad idea the should transport the water to Mars instead

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I recommend that the tritium laced water be used to make a giant moat around the Diet building and everyday the MPs have to swim from shore to work.

I think it will make a great new attraction for the Tokyo site seer!

TritMoat kun character coming right up !

21 ( +21 / -0 )

gov't to buy marine products

What's the Japanese for "Let them eat sashimi!"? It's not cynicism to suggest that the LDP's future Fukushima fish haul will never land on a plate in any of the expensive restaurants they habitually dine at.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

Meanwhile, the Japanese government said Tuesday it will buy marine products as an emergency step to support fishermen if the planned discharge of treated radioactive water from the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea causes damage to their sales.

You mean "we, the taxpayers" will be buying these radioactive marine products. And what happens to these products after the sale? Put into the onigiris sold in convenience stores so no one knows?

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Why Oh Why doesn't the international community stand up to this ridiculous plan that Japan has come up with after 10 years?

Where is public outcry?

The Japanese Government is 100% wrong on this.

It's everyone's ocean.

12 ( +16 / -4 )

so it can directly spill into the ocean for 500 years or whatnot

9 ( +10 / -1 )

I agree with Zichi and Jeff Lee. If it absolutely has to be released, have TEPCO pay for any compensation and take it out to sea and disperse the release, don't do it in a concentrated area. How about Tokyo Bay? Maybe Nagatocho will think twice and begin to understand what the people of Tohoku are fearing.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

if only the planet could defend itself

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Never trusted TEPCO and never will.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

The radiation is going to accumulate not disperse.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

The US will object too it release, and they will do nothing

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The government will also instruct TEPCO to show a specific framework for compensation at an early date to work...

TEPCO.... compensation...early?

Sorry those words just don't go into the same sentence .. despicable TEPCO managment are still to this date denying payout claims to Daiichi disaster evac

Usual pattern of the JGov/Inc. combine. Use tragedies for sympathy points and subsidies and deny relief to the actual victims. The black rain survivors, Minamata....

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The government will temporarily buy and store products that can be frozen......and then what?

Where will it go?

Just to be thrown away later? What a waste of fish resources

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Easy answer is stop eating Fisk and eat your steroids injected chicken/pork/ beef. The radiation will kill off marine life either way

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

If the fish is not suitable for human consumption, will it end up in catfood or other petfood?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

There going to build a tunnel to leak radiation into the ocean? I dont know how or why this company is allowed to manage Fukushima? they caused this man made disaster and yet we are allowing this incompetent company to try and solve a problem they cant. Only in Japan. Geez!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"Meanwhile, the Japanese government said Tuesday it will buy marine products"

So, because we rightfully refuse to buy potentially harmful products, they'll use our taxes to do so so that a company fraught with a history of neglect and dangerous actions can continue to abuse the environment freely, and so the government can then turn around and force feed the products to children in school lunches? Wonderful. At least they won't be able to force other countries that shun the products as a result to buy them, despite Japan crying to International courts about it.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Steroids in meat, radioactive elements in marine products.

It's time to become vegetarian.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

The government will temporarily buy and store products that can be frozen......and then what?

Where will it go?

History tells us they will allow the products to accumulate until they have no more space to store them, and then spend billions of yen looking for solutions for how to get rid. Finally they will build a tunnel under ground to siphon all the collected stuff away and dump it in a big hole. You know - out of sight, out of mind.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Steroids in meat, radioactive elements in marine products.

It's time to become vegetarian.

Nice one. And just wait till you see the horrors of the dairy industry, then you'll go all the way and be vegan. (Best thing I ever did).

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

create a system to prevent reputational damage from arising...

A Ministry of Propaganda, or perhaps Dentsu can lend the advertising and PR prowess to this.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It isn't great but apparently I read the radioactivity being released only has a half-life of 3 days. So if the marine products are not consumed for 3 days after being caught, shouldn't be a problem......... If they are telling the truth.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

If the fish is not suitable for human consumption, will it end up in catfood or other petfood?

It will end up wherever the money takes it.

If a fish is not suitable for human consumption, it is highly likely that it will be cut up and mixed with other fish that are suitable for human consumption.

This is what reportedly happened to a lot of contaminated rice and vegetables previously grown in Fukushima. Rice grown within the exclusion zone got mixed in with rice from outside the exclusion zone, and vegetables were mixed together and sold outside of Fukushima.

Just labeling them as being 'packaged in -city' rather than 'grown in -city' seems to be enough to get around any legalities.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It isn't great but apparently I read the radioactivity being released only has a half-life of 3 days. So if the marine products are not consumed for 3 days after being caught, shouldn't be a problem......... If they are telling the truth.

In that case just dilute it, bottle it up and sell it - but make sure each bottle takes about 2 weeks to make it to the supermarket shelves.

If it's really not a problem, why not? Media campaign, characters, cute models etc.

Yeah, I don't trust them either.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Is one kilometer (.62 mi.) long enough?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

While the level of the radioactive substance tritium that remains in the treated water will be diluted to below regulatory standards

Who in their right mind is going to believe this, what am I saying there are lots here that do.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It will stretch 1 km east from the plant out to sea, releasing the water into an area of the ocean where no fishing rights are in place

Hopefully the tritium cooperates and doesn't creep into the fishing areas. I think if they strongly urge it to cooperate they have a good chance of success on this one.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

the decision to release it offshore into the Pacific is aimed at preventing reputational damage to local marine products amid an outcry from fishermen.

Moron, it is not preventing reputational damage it is doing the exact opposite. How delusional can some people get. The rot of what was once a great country continues.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

While the level of the radioactive substance tritium that remains in the treated water will be diluted to below regulatory standards

In accordance with what regulatory standards? Ours? Weren't they changed in 2012 (or 2013?) in the direction of loosening? Or the European? Regulatory standards of some of our neighbours? Or IAEA?

It will stretch 1 km east from the plant out to sea, releasing the water into an area of the ocean where no fishing rights are in place, according to the sources.

In other words, what the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve over.

But it seems more than strange to me that 1km east there would be no place to fish. Although, maybe that's true - maybe they're afraid to fish there for some reason.

And the idea that 1km will change the dilution is laughable to say the least. They might as well save money and dump it right at the power plant.

The government will offer thorough explanations over the safety of the treated water to businesses involved in processing, distribution and retailing of marine products in order to avoid prices of local marine products falling to unreasonably low levels.

Silencing the critics by overwhelming them with brochures, stacks of papers, creating an infantile mascot promoting thorough explanation...

Sometimes their Genius is almost frightening.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It will stretch 1 km east from the plant out to sea, releasing the water into an area of the ocean where no fishing rights are in place, according to the sources.

Unbelievable, no fishing rights for the fishermen and what rights for the fishes ?, No free movement rights. Scary, that policy formation for a nation is entrusted to fools. These fools think everybody is so stupid to buy this bulls??t.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Simple Solution to this:

In the upcoming election vote the main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan

Criticizing the plan, Yukio Edano, leader of the main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan, said the government is "ignoring the people of Fukushima."

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I'm opposed to nuclear power as I consider it the most polluting, most expensive and least green option. But in this case, the only viable option may be to dilute it at sea. The Pacific Ocean is very large indeed, and the radioactivity levels will be lower than other releases around the world. There may be other, cheaper options, and 1km is not very far out. Mid-ocean would make more sense. Get it over with, try and fix the continued danger that Fukushima Daiichi represents, and learn from this. Nuclear power is a problem not a solution.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Out of sight, out of mind.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

if only the planet could defend itself

That planet will be fine. Humans, on the other hand, might not be.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

TEPCO plans to apply to the Nuclear Regulation Authority for a review of the tunnel construction plan and begin preparatory work in the near future.

Yea great, as if we don't know how these government appointed experts or regulatory committees perform as if we have already forgotten how those on covid are doing.

Geez, Kyodo is not any better than a CCP run news agency. Zero view of an independent expert or environmental group.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Under the measures, the government will temporarily buy and store products that can be frozen or help fishermen expand sales channels for those that cannot be frozen, if demand for domestically produced seafood drops sharply in and outside Japan, the officials said.

The government is not running any money creating business, it is my taxes and yours that is going into funding this madness.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

TEPCO President Tomoaki Kobayakawa told reporters that he will take the government's instruction "seriously," adding his company will announce plans for compensation and the water release "as early as possible."

How assuring from someone who is part of the old boys club, he is in the position he is now by venture of being a former bureaucrat with a golden parachute and who knows the kohais in the ministry would never ruffle the feathers of a senpai.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

To grasp how domestic consumers and people overseas view the safety of the treated water, the government will also conduct an online survey and create a system to prevent reputational damage from arising, the officials said.

Another good example of bureaucrats clearly not serving the public but funnelling taxpayer hard earn funds to special interest companies. Outsource the online survey costing billions of yen to a company run by a special interest.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The government will offer thorough explanations over the safety of the treated water to businesses involved in processing, distribution and retailing of marine products in order to avoid prices of local marine products falling to unreasonably low levels.

Brilliant, Profits to businesses trumps the health of the entire nation. 2021, feudalism at its best.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@Eric It isn't great but apparently I read the radioactivity being released only has a half-life of 3 days. So if the marine products are not consumed for 3 days after being caught, shouldn't be a problem......... If they are telling the truth.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.5 years. The rule is that a sample is safe when its radioactivity has dropped below detection limits. And that occurs at 10 half-lives - 125 years.

These products have been sitting in tanks for just a few years now.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

The entire article is like a government run ad, shows nothing but contempt for the general consumer public. There is zero concern for the health of the citizens in the entire article. Typical Animal Farm.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Oh yeah... a very advanced system for dealing with contaminated waste.

Bunch o codswhallup.

Obviously Japan doesn't really care about the environment or it's people that much.

You can dilute seawater but you can't dilute tritium or cesium and not with water anyway..seems redundant as once the so called "contaminated waste" get released into the ocean the salt condenses it even more because it adheres to itself.

Or makes it way back into the food chain .

Why can't they deal with their waste in a more responsible manner??- because they are incapable of being responsible.!

Oh lets put a USA made reactor in volcanic active faultline area.

Just begging for some monsanto GMO Godzilla sashimi with cesium soy sauce.

But let's all pretend what a advanced society Japan is by doing our best-ganbarimasu.

If Japan could stop burning all its waste into the air and dumping into the ocean and start treating other Asian and foreigners and women and children with respect then maybe just maybe japan might have some friends in the world.

Contaminated waste ...well if they had any idea what they were doing there wouldn't be any waste let alone contaminated.

Its pathetic and incompetent as usual.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Is it safe the fish market will suffer as no one wants to eat Fukushima related nuclear contaminated sea food. Bad idea the should transport the water to Mars instead

People will buy, they have been brainwashed that the expensive kokusan is the safest and the best.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Two birds with one stone, takes care of the Fukushima issue and since there are virtually no spaces left to concrete on land, they decided to start concreting under the ocean now. Got to keep that concrete and contruction industry going since the LDP needs those votes from the Inaka. Brilliant from TEPCO.

But seriously, WT?????? This demands an international outcry.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@GBR48

I'm opposed to nuclear power as I consider it the most polluting, most expensive and least green option.

Totally agree we should be looking more towards geothermal solutions let the planet produce our needs volcanoes are a perfect source and Japan has many(270) https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/japan.html

But in this case, the only viable option may be to dilute it at sea. The Pacific Ocean is very large indeed, and the radioactivity levels will be lower than other releases around the world. There may be other, cheaper options, and 1km is not very far out. Mid-ocean would make more sense. Get it over with, try and fix the continued danger that Fukushima Daiichi represents, and learn from this. Nuclear power is a problem not a solution.

There are other solutions, however releasing it into the ocean is the cheapest and easiest solution. Even with building a 1km pipe.

A Kindai University Team produced a filter that removes Radioactive Tritium from water, of course it is expensive and time consuming and in the eyes of Tepco not worth it compared to just releasing it into the ocean

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Plans, considers, eyeing, thorough efforts, and so on"!

Nothing new, more meetings, more talking. This whole affair stinks (literally?).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Some comments from posters above:

● So, we won’t see the water.

● Government will buy the marine products...and what? Serve them in school lunches perhaps?

● so in other words.. sweep it under the rug

These were my exact first thoughts. If I and other people think this, then TEPCO and the government really are stupid, as well as selfish and corrupt. And incompetent. And nasty.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Finally they will build a tunnel under ground to siphon all the collected stuff away and dump it in a big hole. You know - out of sight, out of mind.

How about it being donated to some poor country and killing to birds with one stone. Good international PR and discarding for free what is not needed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And then, the tanks can fill up with more radioactive water. Clean and dump over and over until science advances enough to fix the nuclear reaction causing this or until there is another earthquake. They should just pay the fishermen forever since the damage to reputation is permanent.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The government is eyeing creating a fund that can be flexibly operated to buy seafood from Fukushima Prefecture and other parts of Japan, according to a plan compiled to help fishermen threatened by reputational damage, government officials said.

The almost unanimous disgust and revulsion at this government/industry synergy is encouraging. Wish it were more widespread though in the mass consciousness.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

TEPCO being such a black company, who would believe once the tunnel is built they will release "qualified" treated water? These guys cannot be trusted.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Out of sight, out of mind.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

While the level of the radioactive substance tritium that remains in the treated water will be diluted to below regulatory standards, the decision to release it offshore into the Pacific is aimed at preventing reputational damage to local marine products amid an outcry from fishermen.

LOL, what is that even supposed to mean?'The proverbial "out of sight, out of mind"? The crowd that protests the release of the excess water into the Pacific will not stop protesting because it is done via a tunnel. Grood grief.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Meanwhile, the Japanese government said Tuesday it will buy marine products as an emergency step to support fishermen

And give it away to schools to feed to the kids. Awesome!

3 ( +5 / -2 )

If they have to dump it simply load it to a ship and dump it 100x km away but No! wait, they want to make a tunnel so that nobody can measure how much radioactive water has been dumped and for how many times. Everything will look calm and clean from outside.

TEPCO plans to dilute the treated water with a large amount of seawater to reduce its tritium concentration to less than 1,500 becquerels per liter.

That is very layman way for 21st century. I have seen similar protocols for dumping acid/alkaline solutions in lab sink. Pathetic!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

TEPCO to build undersea tunnel to release Fukushima water :

Is that the best option Tepco and the authorities can think of?

A kilometer away is not far from the coast, chances are marine lives would still be affected by radioactivity. Why will government buy the marine products?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It seems like the commenters, who propose the ship/tanker solution miss the fact that this is not one-time operation. The water will continue coming and being discharged to the ocean. Like forever. That's why they need a tunnel

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Meanwhile, the Japanese government said Tuesday it will buy marine products as an emergency step to support fishermen if the planned discharge of treated radioactive water from the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea causes damage to their sales.

The government will buy sea products fished in the area where treated water is released, in order to prevent reputational damage? What will the government do with the purchased marine products? Will it resell them somewhere else?  

I'm afraid if such naive efforts to reduce reputation damage may add fuel to fire to the contrary.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"It's time to become vegetarian."

Anyone hankering for veggies from Fukushima?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If the water is not radioactive, as they say; we could just throw it on Japanese lakes and rivers.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

More than 1 million tons of treated water has accumulated at the complex

Why not just recycle the treated water to cool the melted fuel, instead of contaminating more and more water?

If the water isn't fit to be recycled within the reactor, how can it possibly be fit to be 'recycled' into seawater?

As for the guvmint buying up (with taxpayer money) all the seafood the people (=the taxpayer) refuses to buy, why not just tell the fishermen to stop fishing in those waters (basically, the whole of the right-hand side of Japan?) and compensate them for their loss? The fishermen could then spend their time doing something more constructive instead of killing fish destined to be discarded.

The process removes most radioactive materials, including strontium and cesium

Considering the totally moronic way they guvmint is trying to deal with the tritium and the fish, I shudder to think what is being done with the strontium and caesium once they're removed.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan's nuclear industries-LDP complex still repeat lies and deceptions as before Fukushima disaster.

They emphasize the word "damage to reputation", deceive society as if health risk is nothing at all, and try to fabricate atmosphere as if consumers are evil.

Besides, they emphasize Tritium only, never mention that "treated water" they named contains other many kinds of radioactivity over safety standard. 

They insist that "treated water" is safe. but they never dump it to Tokyo bay.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

To grasp how domestic consumers and people overseas view the safety of the treated water, the government will also conduct an online survey and create a system to prevent reputational damage from arising, the officials said.

Doublespeak?

As we all know ‘dumping radioactive waste’ must not lead to ‘reputational damage’ only ‘cancer’

1 ( +1 / -0 )

cleo

More than 1 million tons of treated water has accumulated at the complex

Why not just recycle the treated water to cool the melted fuel, instead of contaminating more and more water?

There is underground water coming off the mountains which leaks into the basements of the reactor buildings. In the beginning, this was a large quantity. Contaminated from radioactivity there and then overflowing into the sea. This was more than 400 tons of water per day per basement.

First TEPCO dug wells upstream to slow down the water amount. Little real effect. TEPCO then built the ¥30 billion ice wall around the reactor buildings to stop the underground water from getting in. Effective but not 100%. About 100 million tons per day still reaching the basements.

Reactors 1-3 need cooling water added but the reactors are cracked so some of the water leaks out into the basements.

Water is still accumulating in the basements.

That is the water pumped out to prevent it from reaching the ocean. Treated to remove all the radioactive particles except the tritium which can not be removed. Water molecule with an extra hydrogen atom. H3O.

That is the water in the storage tanks.

Back to your suggestion. Yes, some of that collected water could be used to cool the reactors instead of freshwater.

After further analysis, it was discovered TEPCO had only removed about 60% of the radioactivity from the water. They claim they are recycling it again.

The wastewater could also be transported and stored at another site within the current exclusion zones. After about ten years, the tritium reaches its half-life.

Difficult to trust anything TEPCO does.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

10 years later and TEPCO and the Japanese government still have the capacity to shock us.

How is decommissioning of all the other nuclear plants in Japan going?

They all take several years so I hope it is happening fast. All ticking time bombs.

So important to always look at origin of vegetables in the supermarket and to never eat at restaurants

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A tunnel through bedrock? What possibly could go wrong there?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Fukushima sashimi restaurants opening in fashionable places like Shibuya and Shinjuku, element of risk with the eating, like fugu, edgy sexy

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Here is a simple idea, make a plastic tube thats 300mm in diameter after the first Km drill 25mm dia holes in it every 1m, and lay the plastic tube onto the sea bed from a small ship for 15-20km out to sea, the water will disperse evenly out into the sea, with no potential hot spots. this could start in a few weeks time, let allown 2-3 year befor the project is even starts, and it would cost a small fraction of the large concrete pipe. you could place monitoring buoys along the pipe to monitor any abnormal levels that occur, it would also tell fishing boats where not to fish with large drag nets.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

cleo

Why not just recycle the treated water to cool the melted fuel, instead of contaminating more and more water?

The problem is water continuously leaking into the building, and not "just recycling" a limited amount of water. Things are a bit more complicated than you imagine.

GBR48

I'm opposed to nuclear power as I consider it the most polluting, most expensive and least green option

Actually, it is not. While the growing water tank farm is visually impressive, the actual damage from the accident is very limited. As for current excess water, the tritium amount is very small, and tritium is naturally occuring in the environment. And these were Gen II reactors, aka very outdated designs. With Gen IV, none of these problems are even possible. The "most polluting, most expensive and least green option" are solar panels and wind farms (if you care to look at their entire lifecycle, instead of those PR pictures of "green" installations surrounded by flowers, cute babies, and singing birds.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Kapuna

A tunnel through bedrock? What possibly could go wrong there?

Yes, tell us what. Where do tunnels usually go.... through air?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Didn't a Deputy Prime Minister said the water is safe to drink? How come until now we didn't see him gulping down the stuff? Can save so much money from having to store that H2O then dump it into the ocean.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I bet Elon Musk would have a better Idea.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@zichi

The so-called Ice Wall looked like a white elephant pretty much from the start.

2013

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Technology/The-ambitious-ice-wall-is-not-working-at-Japan-s-crippled-nuclear-plant

2018

https://asia.nikkei.com/Economy/Fukushima-ice-wall-yields-limited-benefit-for-its-cost

2020

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20200921/p2a/00m/0na/018000c

As Tepco is nothing more than an empty shell taken over by the government, one can say "your tax money at work (or not)", I guess...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

the level of the radioactive substance tritium that remains in the treated water will be diluted to below regulatory standards

I think many posters on here missed this important point.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Should Tepco use Taiheiyō as its own personal septic system? Sure, why not? This instance of the ecosphere is on its way out anyway. Maybe the next one will produce actual 'intelligence'. My vote is for the Baboons if they survive, but Nature is so truly weird it could even be the whales or something us 'dinosaurs' can not even imagine.

if only the planet could defend itself

Against the most invasive and destructive organism in known geological history? Um...have you noticed the weather lately? Seem a bit angrier, does it?

The US will object too it release, and they will do nothing

America has probably dumped more poisons into the oceans even than collective, Corporate, radioactivity certainly*, and a complaint from America would be as much an hypocrisy as American 'history' in general. Don't forget that G. Washington, T. Jefferson, J. Hancock, that corrupt and treasonous financial crook Hamilton, et alia were their generation's 'terrorists', and could be said to have been 'installed by a foreign government' given that the French Army won the American War of Independence, albeit Washington accepted all of the credit while the French got the Guillotine as their reward for bankrupting their country to do so. History is much weirder than the lies we are taught as children and most believe all of their lives.

*Ask the people of the Marshall Islands who used to live on Bikini

0 ( +1 / -1 )

How much will this cost the taxpayer?

They can follow the lead of the US administration and claim that this is “infrastructure” and “investment” and print and spend no?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@joffyToday  03:22 pm JST

the level of the radioactive substance tritium that remains in the treated water will be diluted to below regulatory standards

I think many posters on here missed this important point.

I think you missed out on how incompetent, inept, morally bankrupt and ripe with corruption and conflicts of interest with the government the nuclear industry is in Japan.

Some details from under an article about recent "smoke" in the Hamaoka nuclear power plant and the plug being pulled on the Tsuruga plant after data tampering.

On the Tsuruga power-plant data tampering:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsuruga_Nuclear_Power_Plant#D1-fault_declared_seismic_active_by_the_NRA

quote

In February 2020 the NRA accused Japan Atomic Power of modifying geological data used to determine whether the fault was active or not. The NRA had found that part of the data was deleted and rewritten in documents recently submitted to the NRA. Japan Atomic Power apologized for the "inappropriate handling of data" but stated it had not been done deliberately.

unquote

The "data was deleted and rewritten in documents recently submitted to the NRA...but it had not been done deliberately"-part being a real keeper.

On the smoke (without fire, it seems) at Hamaoka:

https://japantoday.com/category/national/update1-smoke-confirmed-at-hamaoka-nuclear-plant-2nd-reporting-within-week

As an added bonus, here is also the history of incidents at J-nuclear plants:

Here a link to (Japanese) Wiki of 原発事故 (nuclear incidents). Highlights for Japan as below (I only kept dates and incident-names, gory details on Wiki):

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%8E%9F%E5%AD%90%E5%8A%9B%E4%BA%8B%E6%95%85#%E6%97%A5%E6%9C%AC

INES Level 7 incidents:

2011年3月11日 福島第一原子力発電所炉心溶融・水素爆発事故

INES Level 4 incidents:

1999年9月30日 東海村JCO核燃料加工施設臨界事故

Incidents below INES Level 3:

1978年11月2日 東京電力福島第一原子力発電所3号機事故

1989年1月1日 東京電力福島第二原子力発電所3号機事故

1990年9月9日 東京電力福島第一原子力発電所3号機事故

1991年2月9日 関西電力美浜発電所2号機事故

1991年4月4日 中部電力浜岡原子力発電所3号機事故

1997年3月11日 動力炉・核燃料開発事業団東海再処理施設アスファルト固化施設火災爆発事故

1999年6月18日 北陸電力志賀原子力発電所1号機事故

2011年3月11日 東京電力福島第二原子力発電所事故

2013年5月23日 J-PARC放射性同位体漏洩事故

Other incidents:

1973年3月 関西電力美浜発電所燃料棒破損

1974年9月1日 原子力船「むつ」の放射線漏れ事故

1995年12月8日 動力炉・核燃料開発事業団高速増殖炉もんじゅナトリウム漏洩事故

1998年2月22日 東京電力福島第一原子力発電所

2004年8月9日 関西電力美浜発電所3号機2次系配管破損事故

2007年7月16日 新潟県中越沖地震に伴う東京電力柏崎刈羽原子力発電所での一連の事故

2007年11月13日、経済産業省原子力安全・保安院はこの事故をレベル0-と評価した。

2010年6月17日 東京電力福島第一原子力発電所2号機原子炉自動停止

Trusting the J-nuclear lobby is, to put it mildly, being very naive...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The problem is water continuously leaking into the building, and not "just recycling" a limited amount of water. Things are a bit more complicated than you imagine

I'm sure things are more complicated, which is why I asked... If the problem were just water continuously leaking into the building and getting contaminated with radioactivity, that would be one thing, but the article mentions water pumped into the ruined reactors at the Fukushima plant to cool the melted fuel, so it's obviously not just a problem of natural water leakage, they're actively pumping water in. So why not pump in the treated water? Can water containing tritium not be used as a coolant?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Cleo

the answer is yes. But less water is needed than the total amount collected.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The government buys the marine products not fit for human consumption and probably makes fish fertilizer out of it for the agricultural industry or fishing bait or pet food.

Either way the people or their pets are in danger of contaminated marine products finding their way into the food source and DNA fragmentation or mutation.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Does this mean we have to continue subsidizing TEPCO with the "special reconstruction tax" for longer than needed?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Choosing the worst possible solution yet again.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

williB

Gen IV reactors are not available.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The ice wall is a failure costing ¥35 billion and uses an estimated 44 million kilowatt-hours of electricity a year to run, enough to power about 15,000 typical Japanese homes. But they still run it.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-japan-disaster-nuclear-icewall-idUSKCN1GK0SY

0 ( +1 / -1 )

zichi

Gen IV reactors are not available.

Gen III are and are by magnitudes safer than Gen II.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

WilliB Today 

zichi

> Gen IV reactors are not available.

Gen III are and are by magnitudes safer than Gen II.

But the cost of nuclear energy is too high at $8,000 per kW so private companies can no longer afford to build them.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Brian Wheway

Here is a simple idea, make a plastic tube thats 300mm in diameter after the first Km drill 25mm dia holes in it every 1m, and lay the plastic tube onto the sea bed from a small ship for 15-20km out to sea,

OK, while we are into backyard engineeering here, here is another idea: They have this big harbour right in front of the installation, which I think is not used now. How about building a wall to close it and let the water flow in there? There there might be some leackage, but fundamentally they whey would have a huge reservoir where the water can sit until they either have convinced the science deniers that it actually can be released, or found a revolutionary way to remove the tritium. Maybe there is a reason that is not considered, I can not think of one.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

zichi

But the cost of nuclear energy is too high at $8,000 per kW so private companies can no longer afford to build them.

Private companies can certainly not run "green" installations commercially without subsidies, so I am not sure where that arguments leads.

If safe Gen III and IV nuclear power turns out to be expensive, electricity prices will have to rise. At least nuclear power is available long term and environmentally friendly, unlike the current "green" pipe dreams.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Tepco u have created enough problems, please do not do anything under the sea. Please consume aLL FUKUSHIMA water at Y home .

0 ( +1 / -1 )

WilliB

zichi

> But the cost of nuclear energy is too high at $8,000 per kW so private companies can no longer afford to build them.

Private companies can certainly not run "green" installations commercially without subsidies, so I am not sure where that arguments leads.

The Japanese nuclear industry received yearly government subsidies for 50 years at ¥80 billion.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

U.N.B.E.L.I.E.V.A.B.L.E.

Make that number one on the "unique" to Japan roster.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's always depressing to read the majority of comments. All you get is talk, talk, talk. Mostly water over the dam talk, with only a few people who think towards what can be done, not what do I feel about the past, or feel about this, or feel about that, or feel about them. That kind of thinking makes people useless in companies and organizations that do things or build things.

Since many of you didn't study or stay awake in physics or chemistry, you have no history of solving problems other than which train to take.

185-925 Bq per cubic meter of water is the concentration of tritium occurring naturally in water. That's thousands of time more than the concentration of the existing tritium stored in Fukushima when diluted in the ocean, even without further treating the stored water.

The ocean water (and anything living within it) will receive a radiation exposure of just under 0.0000007 mGy every year.

Every person here is exposed to 10 times more radiation every hour just sitting in your living room than from an entire year of floating in the ocean after the release of the stored water.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

185-925 Bq per cubic meter of water is the concentration of tritium occurring naturally in water. That's thousands of time more than the concentration of the existing tritium stored in Fukushima when diluted in the ocean

Interesting. So the water from the naturally-occurring rainwater and groundwater that leaked into the reactor building, in the process of being irradiated and then ‘treated’, ended up with less tritium in it than when it started out? Where has that tritium gone?

And why are the people supposedly in charge of managing all this water, who would surely love to be able to say that the water they want to dispose of is pristine and totally pure, why are these people fretting over not being able to remove the tritium that is already below natural levels?

Why don’t they point out that it’s below natural levels, and dump it in the harbour? Why is so much tax money being spent on treating, storing and disposing of huge amounts of water that is already purer than the naturally-occurring water in the sea? Why are they pledging to buy up and dispose of the fish? Why aren’t they selling it as Fish Raised in Water That is Purer Than Pure?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

TEPCO told lies and altered data before the nuclear disaster. After the disaster, they have also told lies and did a bad PR job of they are doing. That led to mistrust by the public.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Enjoy sushi while you still can.

After TEPCO start releasing radioactive water, the only safe fish is the one from the Atlantic ocean.

I guarantee you most countries will ban all fish import from Japan after TEPCO start releasing water.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

There is a safe way of disposing of tritium. You need to electrolyze it out of the water, release the tritium as just the hydrogen it is. it will migrate up through the atmosphere and in to space. It rises at the incredible rate of 20 m/s! in seven hours it is clear of the atmosphere, never to return to earth. Probably needs to be done at night to stop solar radiation from causing an excess of recombination. And it would cost a lot for the electricity to do it with.... They could just put up a windmill and use the power from it to do all the work. it might take 10 or 15 years, but so what. It's already been 10 years.

I'm just sayin, probably 10 times cheaper than the existing plan, and 50 times safer.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

William Brown

And it would cost a lot for the electricity to do it with.... They could just put up a windmill and use the power from it to do all the work. it might take 10 or 15 years, but so what. It's already been 10 years.

Oh wow. That would be one heck of a windmill. Can you tell us more about that miracle mill?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The biological half life of the highly diluted tritium in fish and other sea life is less than two (2) days.

More than 170 million Americans drink water every day with higher concentrations of tritium than the diluted amount that will be released from Fukushima.

But don't let those facts get in the way of your emotional panic.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It's always depressing to read the majority of comments. All you get is talk, talk, talk. Mostly water over the dam talk, with only a few people who think towards what can be done, not what do I feel about the past, or feel about this, or feel about that, or feel about them. That kind of thinking makes people useless in companies and organizations that do things or build things.

Since many of you didn't study or stay awake in physics or chemistry, you have no history of solving problems other than which train to take.

It unnecessary to put down other members of this forum.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The truth can sting a little.

If you think I wrote something that's not correct, why don't you correct it with some facts? You're just another person who brings no science or facts to the discussion.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

And you people who down voted what I wrote should bring some facts. Hiding behind a down vote proves nothing. The truth comes to your door and you tell it to go away. The facts are all the matter.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Peter Neil

The biological half life of the highly diluted tritium in fish and other sea life is less than two (2) days.

I am completely with you as to the unwarranted scaremongering about releasing tritium into the ocean, however I do not understand what this "biological half life" is. Tritium has a half-life of 12 years; why would that change if it is in organic material?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

As a early .. Compensation?

Make it as soon as possible

And make it sure it will have compensation to all evacuees not only for the fishermen

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Just sad to see the treatment of toxic waste being handled in such an inconsiderate manner and negatively impacting the already fragile environment only to make its way back into our food chain.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Kototama no sakiwau kuni

Just sad to see the treatment of toxic waste being handled in such an inconsiderate manner and negatively impacting the already fragile environment only to make its way back into our food chain.

Reality check: This is not toxic waste, and the water has no effect on the environment.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

WillIB-

the water is contaminated and therefore possible toxic and harmful otherwise there would be no need for a discussion on this topic.

Regardless of the information thats offered of how safe the disposal of the waste is on the environment or safety concerns of the food chain there are those that comment on this discussion that actually care about this issue.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Kyo wa heiwa dayo ne

the water is contaminated and therefore possible toxic and harmful otherwise there would be no need for a discussion on this topic.

It has been thoroughly treated and is probably cleaner than your tap water. The only thing that remains is the Tritium which is almost impossible to remove because it chemically acts as Hydrogen. And the Tritium question has been addressed ... it occurs naturally and is not dangerous in the concentration we are talking about here.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

the Tritium question has been addressed ... it occurs naturally and is not dangerous in the concentration we are talking about here.

Then why on earth is the government spending all this tax money on building a kilometre-long tunnel under the sea, and paying fishermen to catch fish no one wants?

Wouldn't it be a lot cheaper and easier, not to mention environmentally friendlier, to demonstrate to the public that the water poses no danger at all and that the fish are perfectly safe to eat?

Why are they deliberately perpetuating the idea that the treated water is still dangerous?

It doesn't make sense.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Cleo-

Thankyou for pointing out to them that obviously the water is contaminated and a concern .

Seems like a whole lot of effort to dispose of something thats not dangerous.

People will believe anything but ultimately the proof is in the pudding.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

cleo

Then why on earth is the government spending all this tax money on building a kilometre-long tunnel under the sea, and paying fishermen to catch fish no one wants?\

Wouldn't it be a lot cheaper and easier, not to mention environmentally friendlier, to demonstrate to the public that the water poses no danger at all and that the fish are perfectly safe to eat?

Can you spell PR?

Addressing facts is one thing, addressing mass hysteria is something else.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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