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Tokyo's Yamanote line trains start after signal glitch causes 4-hour delay

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Japanese quality these days, it doesn't matter bank technology, Japan stock market technology back in September 2020 or train technology, they'll give you glitches. What they do after that, bowing Japanese style.

-11 ( +13 / -24 )

Good thing this was updated right away so that the commuting workers were easily alerted for alternative ways to go to work. Lucky that I live in Japan where transportation options are endless!

-2 ( +14 / -16 )

Good thing this was updated right away so that the commuting workers were easily alerted for alternative ways to go to work. Lucky that I live in Japan where transportation options are endless!

In some downtown metro areas, maybe. I don't live that far from Tokyo but alternative transportation options are by no means endless. There's only one and taxi lines are extremely long even at night and very time and cost prohibitive. If I had to take one to work, my company would not even consider reimbursing me. They just parrot the same thing on the phone every time: "Get here as fast as you can!"

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Good thing this was updated right away so that the commuting workers were easily alerted for alternative ways to go to work. 

In London and other places, the transit authorities usually dispatch replacement buses that cover the suspended rail routes. I've never seen this in Tokyo after a couple of decades of commuting. My experience is that you're stranded and/or told to wait until services are restored. Three months ago, I went to a pub for dinner before the early evening glitch was resolved. That was OK, although getting hoe 2 hours late on a weeknight wasn't fun.

There may or may not be an alternative route to your destination, and usually if it is, it packed beyond description, with long lineups outside the station.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Down in Kanagawa, if there is trouble on Keihin Tohoku (JR) or Keihin Kyuko (private) lines, the two main lines to Tokyo; they open up and share each others' tickets and passes. A nice action.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Arguably, the most crowded line in Tokyo.

Glad I never need to take it!

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

When the trains go down, we have buses that sub for it and they're free. Never seen such services in Japan. What do they expect the commuters to do in these situations, fly to their destinations?

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

ZorotoToday 12:54 pm JST

"I was planning to arrive early at my office but now I won't make it to a meeting," he said.

> This is some hard hitting new piece right here. Pulitzer prize level reporting.

Two thumbs up.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

That must have been hell for the passengers in this heat...

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Eastman. Research the tech used on Yamanote Line. Far from outdated. Stop making anti-Japan assumptions. Probably because JR isn't Government run.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Research the tech used on Yamanote Line.

COBOL, that's the tech. I've been there, I know.

All lights, crossings, barriers, all in COBOL.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Koreans always make fun of the faxes and seals that Japanese people use, saying they are analog, but I'm happy that Koreans don't know anything about them.

Fax is still used in the United States, England, Germany, France, etc., and the amount of communication exceeds that of Japan. It doesn't mean that everything should be new, but countries that don't have accumulated technology don't seem to understand that.

There was a signal failure on the Yamanote Line today, but if something goes wrong and the train stops, we always have an alternative transportation.

Have people who don't know never used it?

It's a machine, so it can't be helped that it breaks down, so I think it's wiser to use another means of transportation while you're complaining about it.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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