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School leaflet asks students to write down, turn in their social media passwords

51 Comments
By Scott Wilson, SoraNews24

It’s important for everyone in today’s world, especially kids, to be aware of the dangers of scams and giving out private information.

But what do you do when the one asking for that private information is an official document from your school?

That’s what happened recently at a junior high school in Tokyo’s Nerima Ward, which reached the attention of the Internet from this tweet:

▼ (Translation below)

Screen-Shot-2021-12-.png

“Excuse me what? This is so stupid and such a violation of rights that I have no words.

On a leaflet that was sent home with middle schoolers that they were told to use “to discuss house rules for social media,” and “to turn in to their school when finished,” there’s a section for them to fill in their “social media password.”

What are they thinking?!

This is an extreme abuse of authority and an invasion of personal space.”

Many online have posted images of the leaflet in question, showing that this wasn’t some simple typo or anything, it’s pretty blatant:

▼ The line in question is the fourth blank down.

(Translation below)

Screen-Shot-2021-12-.png

Our House Rules for Social Media

Easy Fill-In Sheet

Usage Time

I will use my smartphone and social media for _____ hour(s) each day.

I will use my smartphone and social media until _____ o’clock each day.

Storage Place

After then, I will put it away in _____.

How It's Managed

The password to my social media is _____.

I share this password with _____ (ie: my family).

The Nerima Ward Board of Education has since responded to the controversy, saying that they passed out the leaflets to students for households to create rules for social media, and asked the students to turn them back in to the school to check that they were filled in.

However, the Board of Education notified each school in Nerima Ward saying that students should turn in the leaflet without filling in the password section. Unfortunately one school did not receive that explanation, resulting in 276 students turning it in as-is. There were no reports of such a mistake happening in the other schools.

The Board of Education has said that they will prevent such incidents in the future by deleting the password section, storing the leaflets that were already turned in inside a “locked up location,” and returning them directly to each family. So far they claim that no passwords have been leaked.

Of course that’s a very strange explanation. If students were meant to turn in the leaflet without filling in that blank… then why was it there in the first place? If students were supposed to bring it back home again and then fill it in, there’s no mention of that. And even if that was the case, writing down your password is what you learn never to do in Internet Safety 101 no matter what anyway!

Japanese netizens were similarly confused and shocked:

“I don’t understand why they asked the kids to turn it in in the first place. Their Internet literacy is lower than the kids’ is.”

“Do not fill that in, do not turn that in, do not share it.”

“We’re taught not to leak our passwords, but as soon as you turn it in to the school, it’s leaked….”

“Did Internet literacy just stop progressing 10 years ago???”

“The only correct answer is writing ‘Our house rule for social media is not writing my password here’ in the blank.”

“Schools are trying to control their private lives. Just like Kanagawa trying to limit kids’ time playing games.”

“The only way I can see this being okay is if it’s a trick question, and when the students turn in the leaflets with their passwords on it, the teacher admonishes them, saying, ‘Didn’t we teach you not to tell anyone your password?’ (Obviously not what happened)”

Hopefully no irreparable damage comes from this incident, and the Nerima Ward Board of Education learns from their mistake.

Source: Bengo4.com via Hachima Kiko

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© SoraNews24

©2023 GPlusMedia Inc.

51 Comments
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An invasion of privacy-overreach!

12 ( +16 / -4 )

School asks students to write down, turn in their social media passwords

Perhaps teachers and administration can demonstrate by first sharing their own passwords.

26 ( +27 / -1 )

Sad. More J school officials and committees sitting around, unable to keep pace with society, helpless to contend with an already changed world.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

“The only way I can see this being okay is if it’s a trick question, and when the students turn in the leaflets with their passwords on it, the teacher admonishes them, saying, ‘Didn’t we teach you not to tell anyone your password?’ (Obviously not what happened)”

If it was this way it could have been an object lesson in gullibility and to not blindly respect authority. Something which even Japanese of very advanced age seem to have yet to learn.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

The other “sad” part of all this is that some current media outlets would be bereft of ANY “stories” without Twitter and their social media: ) “That’s what happened recently, … *which reached the attention of the Internet from this *tweet

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The password to my social media is __secret___.

I share this password with _nobody____ (ie: my family).

9 ( +10 / -1 )

The other “sad” part of all this is that some current media outlets would be bereft of ANY “stories” without Twitter and their social media: ) 

Twitter is a far more reliable place to source news than corporate media, sadly. People are just going to have to learn how to separate the wheat from the chaff.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

I bet most answered with 'password'.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Whoever is responsible should be fired. He/she is obviously an idiot or an identity thief.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

My password is none of your business

9 ( +10 / -1 )

It's the parents role to protect their children. I would sue the H#$ out of the school system for trying to grab passwords from little kids. WTF?!

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Because all social media is just one platform and one password?

Do they even know how “sns” works?

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Simple, replace it with . .

"I will share my social media password with with my parent or guardian if requested"

Besides, half of these social networks use 2FA or MFA to login anyway.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This happened to my son last year; except it was a teacher, not the school, asking for each student's personal email address & password. Some kids turned it in the day it was asked but most of the kids were like, "No way!" and informed parents when they got home. I'm one of them. Needless to say, I complained like hell (as did many parents). Teacher apologized and said it was a misunderstanding. He said he wanted to install an app on the kids' phones to help with school projects. Uh huh, yeah, right.

Unfortunately, this teacher is still around.....

9 ( +11 / -2 )

So if a Japanese school ask their students to jump off a cliff they will do it?

The level of education must be very high…

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Social media is evil.

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

Many Boards of Education are run by dinosaurs unable to grasp its 2021 and not 1951 unfortunately.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Idiotic to the degree that everyone involved in this "mistake" should get sacked. How can you allow these imbeciles to be in charge of the welfare of our kids?

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Simple, replace the school principle.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Unfortunately one school did not receive that explanation, resulting in 276 students turning it in as-is.

How typical of Japanese not to question just how much this questionnaire violates their personal data and privacy - instead of asking "why?" when asked to jump, they'll simply ask, "how high?".

It's common sense to keep your passwords confidential and private. This questionnaire is absurd and a complete breach of privacy. Maybe Japanese schools should start teaching their kids how to advocate for themselves and question authority figures who hand out things like this.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Helpless and desperate school officials are trying to make there presents felt as they become more and more IRRELEVANT.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Once again the Board of Education shows how ridiculous and out of touch they are with the generation they pretend to serve, Ministry of Silly Walks.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

My Nigerian banker requires all your bank details too...including the pin code and CVC for your card.....

7 ( +10 / -3 )

The password to my social media is __password___.

I share this password with _everybody____ (ie: my family).

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Asiaman7Today 06:54 am JST

Perhaps teachers and administration can demonstrate by first sharing their own passwords.

That would result in many unsavory perversions and peccadilloes coming to light, resulting in criminal charges and much 'meiwaku' and 'confusion' for society.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

What a strange hype about it. There are no safe passwords or accounts and on the other side there’s also no totally safe haven for the hackers, intruders, stalkers etc. Both sides aren’t completely safe. In this case here it’s even easier to catch the bad person, because if anything happens , the group of suspects to trace is very small , identifiable right from the start and very highly probable limited to the teachers and other school staff plus their nearest surroundings. That revealed account and password written down and given to the school is the safest thing they can do. And of course there’s still the possibility afterwards to create another separated account for full playing, if there are still other needs or doubts.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

The fact that 276 reported their passwords proves that still a lot of education is needed.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

** is my password.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I typed 6 asterisks but only 2 are being shown. One more time below

** is my password.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

If you use 16-26 character passports each unique for a site the hackers will never be able to decypher them.

Passwords should be hashed in the database table. Hashing is a one-way algorithm that cannot be decrypted (though some older alogorithms have been cracked over the years). The length of your password is irrelevant to hashing - the hash is the same number of characters regardless of the length of the password.

Where longer passwords help is with brute force attacks. Brute force attacks just keep trying passwords until they find one that works. A well-coded system will not allow repeated failed password attempts (aka brute force attacks), but many sites don't have any protection against this and therefore you will want to use a longer password on these sites.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

I recommend using 16 to 26 character passports too.

Especially, for multi-nationals.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

I am of split mind about this. Yes, it is a terrible violation of privacy rights, but then again how much privacy rights should minors have in an institution that is responsible for their safety, seeing how bullying is happening on SM.

(Check out the recent case of Saaya HIrose in Hokkaido for example.)

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

I love how this comes on the heels of Japanese lawmakers crying about how Japan is constantly getting hacked and how they need a new cyber security agency.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Hashing passports is done by the site, not the user.

Yes. It's not something a user could do. It has to be done by the site before saving the data to the database.

Users are unable to tell if a site is hashing passwords or not (though any site that emails you your password is not hashing their passwords) so long passwords should be used.

I was just identifying that the below quote was a little off, as hashed passwords cannot be decrypted (aka deciphered):

If you use 16-26 character passports each unique for a site the hackers will never be able to decypher them.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The big tech companies (not Japanese ones) are moving away from passwords altogther. Two factor authentification, for example. MS /Google are planning to introduce this as the ONLY way to login. Meanwhile, the Japanese are just getting to terms with the password system it seams. So far behind, its not even funny.

Oh, and passwords are flawed. There is NO SAFE password.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

My password is none of your business

@Yrral - I'd add a few numbers or symbols in there if I were you...

2 ( +4 / -2 )

time to cancel social media then. You can just live without it y'know

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The best one is:12345

Easy!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Someone decided to do this.

A person, receiving taxpayers money as a salary (probably?) wrote this document and arranged to pass it to children.

Possibly, other people signed-off on it, and agreed to it.

Why are these people still employed?

Why are they not facing criminal charges?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Mark @ 9.50am

Assume you mean "principal?"

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Perhaps it’s because you sometimes forget an “s?

@Livin’inParadise 4:02pm: “Half the time I can't even remember my pasword.” -
0 ( +1 / -1 )

Some employers will ask job applicants for their social media names and even passwords. I would never give these out but apparently some employers will reject applications that do not provide this information unless they are in a state that prohibits the practice. Not all do. Many employers also require a credit check. I have had potential employers reject my application because I never borrow and don't have a credit card. There is nothing to find when they run a credit check. I have no credit history and they don't like that. Employers want debt slaves they can abuse.

https://www.justia.com/employment/hiring-employment-contracts/use-of-social-media-in-hiring/

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Perhaps it’s because you sometimes forget an “s” ?

@Livin’inParadise 4:02pm: “Half the time I can't even remember my pasword.”

Oh man that one made me laugh out loud! Thanks.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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