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Tourists banned from private alleys in Kyoto's geisha district

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Good luck enforcing that.

At the upscale Sembikiya cafe in Omotesando yesterday afternoon, a European family let their two children run wild throughout the establishment, causing one Japanese woman in her early 50s to finally scream 「うるさい」 (Urusai! (Be quiet!)).

I think many in Japan are tired of seeing their peaceful corners disrespected by discourteous guests.

20 ( +42 / -22 )

misconceptions, geishas are not prostitutes, but rather entertainers and raconteurs

That's really make difference.

-20 ( +8 / -28 )

Despite common misconceptions, geishas are not prostitutes, but rather entertainers and raconteurs

Who are you trying to kid? That is exactly what they were and in fact veeeery expensive prostitutes at that, throughout Japans history. It is only recently that their history has been whitewashed to make it look presentable!

Secondly, I would like to see how they are going to stop those mannerless Chinese or Korean tourists from entering those private alleys!

-16 ( +23 / -39 )

@Paul - Maybe so, but lets update your comment to 'mannerless Mainland Chinese and Americans' shall we? That would be way more accurate in representing the problem.

10 ( +24 / -14 )

Hey Let's go to Kyoto, they have cool Geisha and Maiko walking on the street.

While in Kyoto, tourist are forbidden.

-24 ( +8 / -32 )

rainman1Today  07:10 am JST

@Paul - Maybe so, but lets update your comment to 'mannerless Mainland Chinese and Americans' shall we? That would be way more accurate in representing the problem.

How about just update it to mannerless tourists, since they come in all nationalities?

Japan/Kyoto is in a pickle of its own making here. Tourism was strongly promoted overseas, so tourists came and kept on coming. The yen is weak now so Japan has become more affordable for many who could previously never have afforded it. Naturally some of those tourists are going to be polite and some aren't. Also, Japan tends to romanticize the whole geisha thing and for many, it is very exotic and unusual, so it's no wonder people clamor to see them.

I've also seen no acknowledgement of how those tourists are helping to keep alive some of the Japanese crafts, especially those related to kimonos and their accoutrements. Whichever side you fall on the cultural appropriation argument, it's hard to argue that the many tourists shelling out yen to wear kimono, obi, geta, etc. for a day aren't putting money in the coffers of shops that would otherwise go out of business since it's not as if young Japanese are stepping over each other to buy and wear kimonos.

https://kyoto.travel/en/news/Manners_Poster_Released.html

29 ( +34 / -5 )

 think many in Japan are tired of seeing their peaceful corners disrespected by discourteous guests.

They and especially the government love the tourists dollars though.

-1 ( +20 / -21 )

Not sure how they are going differentiate between tourist and outsiders with legitimate business to be there.

20 ( +24 / -4 )

Typical money first, plan second approach to everything nowadays

9 ( +16 / -7 )

KazukoHarmonyToday  06:56 am JST

Good luck enforcing that.

At the upscale Sembikiya cafe in Omotesando yesterday afternoon, a European family let their two children run wild throughout the establishment, causing one Japanese woman in her early 50s to finally scream 「うるさい」 (Urusai! (Be quiet!)).

I think many in Japan are tired of seeing their peaceful corners disrespected by discourteous guests.

Again, this is hardly limited to overseas tourists. I've been in Denny's and watched Japanese children crawl over booths. I've been basically pushed aside by groups of Japanese schoolchildren moving in large numbers across the sidewalk. I've sat in cafes, unable to hear myself think due to two or three Japanese women talking so loudly you'd think they were all partially deaf. There are polite and rude people everywhere. It just tends to be more noticeable when the rude ones don't blend in with the locals due to their appearance or language.

32 ( +37 / -5 )

Despite common misconceptions, geishas are not prostitutes, but rather entertainers and raconteurs highly skilled in traditional Japanese dance, musical instruments and games.

Depends how much money the guy is willing to splash….

-1 ( +15 / -16 )

Does this include Japanese tourists or only foreigners?

14 ( +21 / -7 )

I think many in Japan are tired of seeing their peaceful corners disrespected by discourteous guests.

I used to feel that when I lived in Kyoto over 30 year ago and every time I went to some famous temple (or even less famous one), it was full of Japanese schoolkids on a school trip making noise, disrespecting the place and the other visitors but it never changed from one year to the next.

7 ( +18 / -11 )

Tourists equals all foreigners?

-6 ( +11 / -17 )

From my experience, bad mannered tourists are really a tiny fraction, which the local media like to report on it.

Eating or drinking in a street can be a bad manner here, which causes no problem in my country. But never had any issues when doing it.

Tourism is now a strong part of the Japanese economy

15 ( +18 / -3 )

This is what happens when you debase your currency by 50%. Japan is now Thailand.

-1 ( +14 / -15 )

Social media narcissistis taking selfies are the lowest form of life. Yet they're allowed into the country. It's all about caaaash isn't it?

-8 ( +7 / -15 )

Good!!..

Foreigners visiting Japan must obey Japan laws and behave properly..

Their country..

Their rules..

GO JAPAN!!..

-23 ( +7 / -30 )

Probably a good thing. The vast majority of tourists simply do not have the connections to make appointments with geiko - so they really have no business in those alleys.

One member previously told Japanese media about an instance of a maiko's kimono being torn and another who had a cigarette butt put in her collar.

Despicable. Who knows the nationality of these horrible tourists. One thing is for sure - they must despise geiko - and probably Japan. They have destroyed the experience for everyone.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

It’s a simple problem easily remedied but somehow that solution escapes the inside-box-thinking Kyoto councilors.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

One nation - starting with C -"was most likely the group who butted out a cigarette on a geiko-sans collar.

Right. Definitely not a drunk Japanese sarariman.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Homogenous, rule-bound and fussy Japan is not cut out for international tourism. Time for the country to bow out of its global tourism push and return to the quiet, forgotten and close-minded realm it once was.

-10 ( +11 / -21 )

I know I’ll get downvoted for this as I always do but over-tourism is a problem.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Well, this is what happens when authorities at local, prefectural and national level play the whole we want tourism in millions and millions card - the Abe Govt had a figure of 20 million - and don't show any real understanding of the fact that tourism brings problems as well as money.

Japanese tourists used to be all over my home city and state in the US photographing everything including private residences and sitting on the public transit system jamming it up and theJ men and kids taking seats that old people, the disabled and pregnant women should have been on. The J sex tourists in the Philippines, Thailand and Cambodia don't do anything positive for Japan's rep in south-east Asia. The idea that non Japanese tourists have a monopoly on bad behavior is horseshizz.

So Kyoto has private clubs like just about everywhere in Japan? Big deal, just put signage in different languages in those allies and pay security to manage it. But yet again this comes down to tightwad behavior which is part of the problem of Japan that gets blamed on tourists. Wasn't long ago we heard that Kyoto 'suffered a drop in tourism' from the Covid 19 pandemic - can't have it both ways but for some reason Japanese authorities and business owners all over Japan think they can.

We need your money but we don't want you - then choose one or the other. Just stop griping continually about tourism when you invited the world in.

-3 ( +12 / -15 )

"" As the ancient city tackles overtourism after the pandemic ""

There is NO such thing as "Overtourism" as most busy or popular places do Limit the number of visitors per day week or month and everyone will follow the rules. Just because they can't comprehend & manage the number of visitors doesn't mean they have to BANN everyone, how sad.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

The hypocrisy bothers me more than anything. No matter where you are in Japan... if you have many bars concentrated in one area, no matter whether it is foreigners or Japanese, you're going to have issues. If it were noisy drunk Japanese causing problems... then nothing is said, but the second a "foreigner" causes a problem, it is practically National News. Quit the blame game and pay for more security in those areas. Bars have security and bouncers in other countries for a reason.

-4 ( +12 / -16 )

I am beginning to think that many places are using the term "Overtourism" to make it sound important and promote their businesses.

This must be the new BUZZ word to promote businesses around here, soon people will be turned off and will stop going to these place, then watch them CRY for loosing business.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

"It's not a theme park" then create a theme park, rearrange some streets and set a zone where the tourist could take pictures in exchange of a payment, you can install performers and increase the consumption. You're living from the tourist make it easy for everyone. Put clearly visible signs that show that you're leaving that zone and not pictures/traspassing is allowing and the you can incur in severe fines including jail. That will reduce greatly the issue and you will only need to deal with just a few tourists that cannot read in any language including its own.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Private roads and footpaths should be signposted forbidding entry.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

Since the rise of the influencer tourism has reached new levels of obnoxiousness. People with their cameras on constantly, standing in the way, harrassing locals, and just being a general nuisance.

Yes, I can be a miserable old git, but why cant people just enjoy something without having to document its every detail In a video?

10 ( +11 / -1 )

I think many in Japan are tired of seeing their peaceful corners disrespected by discourteous guests.

Well said.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

LindsayToday 07:39 am JST

Does this include Japanese tourists or only foreigners?

My question exactly but I think we all know the answer. This country is so tiring with its greed on one hand and bias on the other.

KazukoHarmonyToday 06:56 am JST

Good luck enforcing that.

> At the upscale Sembikiya cafe in Omotesando yesterday afternoon, a European family let their two children run wild throughout the establishment, causing one Japanese woman in her early 50s to finally scream 「うるさい」 (Urusai! (Be quiet!)).

> I think many in Japan are tired of seeing their peaceful corners disrespected by discourteous

Some woman in a cafe complained about noisy European kids? Well, I see this behavior damn near every day here. We all know what the only difference is and that is the ethnicity of the people involved. I have to shoo away kids all the time who think I'm some kind of sideshow for them to look at with curiosity or play games around. I'm tired of Japan acting like their corners are peaceful and only disrespected by discourteous guests. They are guilty of being discourteous too. Some foreigners spend all day telling them how special they are so it fills their head with garbage.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

Foreign tourist left so much money in Kyoto, a city that is technically broke btw. But let's complain about them, because a couple of incidents represent all of the -foreign, of course- tourists.

In 2019, the Gion district council put up signs saying "no photography on private roads" warning of fines of up to 10,000 yen.

This is very much on every road around Gion, which is weird because some of them are not private roads.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Homogenous, rule-bound and fussy Japan is not cut out for international tourism.

That's right. We are closed minded because we ask victors to respect the rules and respect the people of Japan.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Foreign tourist left so much money in Kyoto, a city that is technically broke btw.

Total BS. Kyoto already in the black. Look at the website:

https://www.city.kyoto.lg.jp/gyozai/page/0000276230.html

c., the fiscal year 2020 financial results were in the black

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

It’s a simple problem easily remedied but somehow that solution escapes the inside-box-thinking Kyoto councilors.

And what is idea?

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Perhaps if Kyoto and Japan didn't use geisha so prominently in their marketing, unruly people would not be so desparate to photograph them. Part of this is bait and switch. People are lured in with visions of a ye olde Japan that can only be found in increasingly crowded spots. If its wrong to photograph geisha, tourism promotion should not photograph them either. Its not setting a very good example, is it?

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Not sure how they are going differentiate between tourist and outsiders with legitimate business to be there.

It is pretty easy to do, if stop and think about it.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

The foreigners who just stand in front of the train ticket gate, usually with luggage, peeve me the most. Go through the gate or get out of the way!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

At any highly trafficked tourist spot, proper etiquette info should be displayed. Some travelers really don’t know.

when you gaijin into the country

I learn something new every day. Now “gaijin” is a verb!

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Time for Japan to close the gate.

-14 ( +2 / -16 )

Check the news. Migrant workers, refugees and tourists are now regarded as legitimate targets in our newly re-tribalised society. Nobody wants them, even if they need their money or their skills.

They could rope off private roads [to all but residents and their guests] as happens already in some Tokyo suburbs, and in other countries. In the UK, traffic and parking zones are being set up to block anyone who isn't a resident from using some roads. If they just want to keep foreign tourists out, a Yak doorman and a 'Japanese only' sign would do it.

The usual way of dealing with this is for the real deal to move away from the tourist draw areas, leaving tourist-facing folk to monetise the crowds.

To get the numbers down charge a $500 or $1000 entry fee at the airports. That would certainly limit families as it would rapidly stack up. But don't expect to pull in the cash. Only mass tourism does that. Rich people spend differently in a limited number of exclusive shops, and much less cash gets spread around when they visit. So free money from the state would have to be regularly offered instead.

Geisha used to be fixers for movers and shakers back in the day, acting as discreet go-betweens for businessmen and politicians. To some extent they may still do that. Their role is often underestimated.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

All people can enter the private roads but not take photos.

80% of Kyoto tourists are Japanese.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

As difficult as this seems to enforce, I can imagine that people in Kyoto are getting fed up with tourists. I was there before the pandemic, and it was like an amusement park. I remember seeing a Maiko walking along the street with a whole hoard of tourists following and trying to take pictures. It was like when when one of the Disney characters show up at Disney land. It must be difficult to go about your business in such circumstances.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

GBR48 Today 10:27 am JST

None of your suggestions are workable.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Private roads and footpaths should be signposted forbidding entry.

That's a good idea.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

I'm going to walk there and if they ask me to get out I will start waveing with my resident card.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Do the owners of the "private roads" pay for the maintenance of them or is it made by the Kyoto government?

Where I live, the city authority does not maintain private roads even when used by the public.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I'm going to walk there and if they ask me to get out I will start waveing with my resident card.

Me too. But I don't really like Kyoto TBH. Much better places I know of worth the visiting.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

They could profit off this with GeishLand. Entrance fee is 10,000 yen. Do whatever the hell you want.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

It will be impossible to police. There are businesses on those private roads.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

There are businesses on those private roads.

You know Japanese people, they will self police. The busy bodies will monitor and approach every foreigner to escort them out as citizen police patrol.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

When we lived in Kobe it was very easy to visit Kyoto. We went many tens of times. But now we are finished unless there is an exceptional art exhibition. The buses are a nightmare.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The buses are a nightmare.

Walk, bicycle, subway, taxi, Uber? Last time I went to Kyoto was during coronavirus. It had some appeal because I have decent memories of visiting in the 90's but the problem is that as a super tourist destination all non-Japanese like me are immediately treated as tourists which is annoying. The most effective way I saw for them to keep out foreigners was to have menus in handwritten cursive Japanese.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

The buses are a nightmare.

I say. So are the people who visit too frequently and clog the place up.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Just close Japan to tourism. No more tourists staying in hotels, buying at shops and restaurants, no money coming in.

Or they can ask tourists to just drop all their money at customs and go back to their country. Tell them how much Japan hates tourists.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

So much for OMOTENASHI...

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

I say. So are the people who visit too frequently and clog the place up.

You could say the same about Tokyo. 15 million tourists.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Despite common misconceptions, geishas are not prostitutes, but rather entertainers and raconteurs highly skilled in traditional Japanese dance, musical instruments and games.

That's a big part of the problem. Many people I knew in HS who enlisted in the USMC (and the Navy) who were going to Japan had this area about getting 'geisha' girls who will do everything for you like fix your meals, clean the house you both live in, and of course - sex. And the idea of taking them back to the U.S.A. to be your subtle submissive 'love partner/household servant/blah blah'. Fantasies, and warped ones at that.

Of course there are brothels and red light districts in Japan but 'geishas' aren't a part of that. At least not today they aren't.

Maybe one time in the distant past that was so but I graduated from HS in 1984. Japan was long a different place at that time, even though there's some hater rubes with that 'Pearl Harbor' excuse to hate.

That was 40 years ago. The fantasy wasn't really true then, are there really some people who still think these things? Some people need a real education, fast! A crash course study.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Redemption

You know Japanese people, they will self police. The busy bodies will monitor and approach every foreigner to escort them out as citizen police patrol.

Are you being sarcastic? If so, good point. Most Japanese people are passive-aggressive and terrified of direct confrontation. Rather than approach foreigners to escort them away, what you'll hear is a lot of tongue clicking and cursing under their breath in barely audible tones...

And besides, if the road is closed to "tourists," how are they supposed to determine which foreigners are tourists and which are residents, and ditto for Japanese people?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

It could be hard to police as there are businesses on those private roads. I think a few signs put up is necessary. The local community or the government could fund them. Where I live it would be the government's job.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The Geishas instead of walking could move around in small electric taxis.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Private roads have a "right-of-way" that users have used for hundreds of years and can't be changed. At our property in Nagano, there is a right-of-way across the land to allow the rice farmers to reach the river for water.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The Geishas instead of walking could move around in small electric taxis.

They do that already. Never been to Gion, eh? You should go there at least once so you can say you have been to Kyoto "many many tens of times"

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Elvis is here

The Geishas instead of walking could move around in small electric taxis.

> They do that already. Never been to Gion, eh? You should go there at least once so you can say you have been to Kyoto "many many tens of times"

If that were correct then there would not be a problem with Geisha and photographs. Some take a normal taxi to a distant place but many many walk the streets and that becomes the problem. Take them off the streets.

Kyoto is only about 60 minutes from Kobe on the S-Rapid. Very easy travel. But you would know that from having a store there.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Poor little Japan 126 million people and 25 million visitors to Japan last year and it is suffering from "overtourism"!

Imagine what it would be like if a country had more tourists per year than the entire population?

Oh wait France has 67 million people and gets over 80 million visitors per year!

Maybe Japan should ask them how it is done instead of trying to stop the flow of business and incoming money!

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

 Take them off the streets.

Why? It is their streets. Taking a taxi across the road would be silly don't you think.

Restrict tourists. Put up signs as you suggested. Give it a rest.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

In December, a Gion district council comprised of residents urged Kyoto City to tackle the issue, saying their neighborhood "is not a theme park".

Let me fix the article:

In December, a Gion district council comprised of old retired men and women residents and teahouse owners urged Kyoto City to tackle the issue, saying their neighborhood "is not a theme park".

There fixed!

I doubt other businesses in the area like the idea of chasing away business!

These teahouse are generally exclusive to regular patrons and only new " introduced" patrons, they don't depend on tourism like many other businesses in Kyoto!

Imagine my previous street (residence ) in Tokyo.

It was a private road also on our road I had my business and 2 more businesses all 3 of us depended on tourists and walk-in traffic!

It wasn't the locals on our street buy our products or services.

So the non businesses out numbered the 3 businesses, using the Kyoto thinking my neighbours could decide to close the road and end the businesses!

Result: people lose their jobs, city loses taxes, and a domino effect would follow with suppliers etc....

The crazy thing is when other businesses around end up suffering and they lose money and they end up paying less taxes, then the government will have to raise taxes on the remaining businesses including those teahouses to compensate the lost tax revenue.

Then these same places will complain about the higher taxes!

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Elvis is here

Today 01:15 pm JST

Take them off the streets.

> Why? It is their streets. Taking a taxi across the road would be silly don't you think.

> Restrict tourists. Put up signs as you suggested. Give it a rest.

If anyone should give it a rest it is the old fuddy duddies running the teahouses.

As the article say!

geishas are not prostitutes, but rather entertainers and raconteurs highly skilled in traditional Japanese dance, musical instruments and games.

And guess what happens when "entertainers" go out in public?

People notice them people take their pictures, I know my son is an entertainer TV movies etc..and when we go out he is recognized and yes plenty of people take his picture to post on social media!

If you chose to be in a business where you are going to attract attention then don't complain when you do!

Plenty of young ladies show up at my store (located in my house) hoping to see my son here!

They are not here for my services or to buy my products (you know because of the way the look around).

They don't want to be noticed or to have people look at them or take their picture, then get a plain old boring job in an office etc....

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

Elvis is here

 Take them off the streets.

> Why? It is their streets.

The streets belong to all the Japanese people not just the Gaisha.

Stop playing the fool.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Well, stop offending geishas. Geishas are cool girls, you can talk about a lot with them, they know and can do a lot. Just a treasure for men. You can talk to them, or you can come up with something more interesting

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

So basically unenforceable since if aimed at all tourists, this will apply to ones of Japanese decent too. And how will those old guys in uniforms enforce the "rules" ? And will non-japanese looking residents of Kyoto be able to traverse those backstreets unmolested?

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

I think this attempt would be illegal. All the private roads and alleys have "right-of-way" use which people have used for hundreds of years. People can't be prevented from using them.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Kyoto should be careful because the city would crumble financially without all the tourism.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

During the Covid, the city fathers struggled to pay the bills and complained about the lack of tourism.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Stop playing the fool.

That's a very rude thing to type Wallace.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

If anyone should give it a rest it is the old fuddy duddies running the teahouses.

I agree. Also, the old fuddy duddies thinking what they know best for Kyoto

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Unfortunately, the Kyoto City fathers don't read JT.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

If Kyoto people are like the people just downvoting any mildly critical comment here then they do not want to hear any other point of view except their own whining about foreigners, while believing Kyoto and Japanese do not wrong. They possibly get what they deserve.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

freedom for geishas

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Most commenters here generalize out of the scope of what actually is happening!

And it is the locals and businesses that own these tea houses in the old area that do not want tourists disrupting there peace!

The signs to keep quite when entering those narrow streets were there in Japanese and English from before.

Now they step up and want to ban entering or taking photos. I don't like it but if those streets are really private then they have the right to ask the authorities to help them.

It's a global thing - many places worldwide are loosing their charm. The lucky people that could go and visit some years ago will have the memories. Once the popularity grows the charm is also diminishing...

2 ( +6 / -4 )

wallaceToday  01:37 pm JS

The streets belong to all the Japanese people not just the Gaisha.

Stop playing the fool.

No they don't.

The Geisha reside in Gion. And the article is about restricting tourist; visitors from outside who come for recreation, in an effort to make lives of the residence more comfortable. Why put Geisha in electric taxis to do a short commute? That would be ridiculous.

Would you like to be put in a taxi to go about your daily business because some tourists want to photograph you with out your consent? Would you tolerate it? I highly doubt it.!.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Elvis is here

wallace

The streets belong to all the Japanese people not just the Gaisha.

> Stop playing the fool.

> No, they don't.

Legally the roads belong to the prefecture, the city authority, or the local authority. All "public roads" are open for use by all the people. I don't own the road outside my house even if I live here. But I am charged for its upkeep.

There are also private roads and alleys as found in Gion but they all have "right-of-way-use" as can be found in many other locations.

Public roads are considered public property.

The Geisha reside in Gion. And the article is about restricting tourist; visitors from outside who come for recreation, in an effort to make lives of the residence more comfortable. Why put Geisha in electric taxis to do a short commute? That would be ridiculous.

The restrictions have to be legal ones. The authorities can not ban selected users from using the roads and alleys. The Constitution guarantees freedom of movement.

Gaishi walks to further locations than just in Gion. Kyoto relies on the income from tourism. 8 out of 10 tourists are domestic ones.

Would you like to be put in a taxi to go about your daily business because some tourists want to photograph you with out your consent? Would you tolerate it? I highly doubt it.!.

You can photograph anyone anywhere on a public highway. It is not illegal. I would rather take a mini taxi to another place than be harassed by tourists.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

There are five Gaisha Districts.

Kyoto has 5 hanamachi, each with its own history and flavors. Collectively they are known as the Gokagai (五花街), which means “Five Flower Towns.”

https://mai-ko.com/travel/culture-in-japan/geisha/kyotos-5-geisha-districts-history-festivals-main-differences-in-traditions-crests/

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I say. So are the people who visit too frequently and clog the place up.

---You could say the same about Tokyo. 15 million tourists.

No you couldn't. Tokyo doesn't have the same tourist problems as Kyoto. Especially over crowded buses you mentioned

Being a former resident of 新大久保 you should know that.!.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Finally, a rule that keeps all the annoying selfie sticks away, so that we from the upper class have our peace.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

To see geishas and maikos walking around in the streets is unique also for Japanese tourist groups in Kyoto and I can say, especially the Japanese visitors are taking a lot of pictures and not only in a discrete way by a mobile phone from a distance but also using big cameras with strong flash light.

And why not? Without these unique geishas and maikos in the streets no tourist will walk around in that area, as you can visit similar historical villages with narrow streets in many places in Japan.

Without international and domestic tourists all these geishas in Kyoto would be jobless. You cannot ask tourists to come and visit your place while demanding they should not take pictures or walking around entering narrow historically interesting roads.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Without foreign tourist all these traditional Japanese areas will shut down! They simply won’t have enough revenue from the Japanese people. Most Japanese people don’t go to these type of areas anymore except for the holiday seasons when a few do! So they will be stuck with a few old timers customers who won’t be enough in terms of revenue! Even traditional shrines in Japan can’t gather enough participants for their annual events as each year more and more say it’s the final time they are doing some of these events!

The failure of Japan to adapt to changes will be their downfall once again!

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Without foreign tourist all these traditional Japanese areas will shut down!

Huh? 80% of tourists are Japanese. And from the article, it appears tourists are banned, not foreigners.

Maybe read the article a little closer?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

In one part of gion Japanese paparazzi or just Japanese blokes wait to take pictures of the maiko coming out of there houses going to work, will the council stop them ?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Kyoto city councilors are a joke!

An impoverished city needs more money not less.

Sawdust for brains…

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

So much of the 'tourist problem' in Japan comes from the lack of foresight and planning on the part of authorities. Have densely populated tourist areas in a densely populated country in the the urban areas? Do some damn planning before you start pitching for the tourist yen.

Yep, there are tourists who frankly shouldn't be doing what they do but this is everywhere period - I don't know how some posters here can bellyache about moronic tourists blocking access etc in Japan and behave as if it's something that only is done by tourists in Japan.

Whatever you do don't go to Rome or to Termini Station and its surrounding areas - far more crowded and frustrating - and I've yet to see tourists in Japan behave with the disrespect some loser tourists do every year to the Buckingham Palace and other palace guards in London.

Australians for decades have had to put up with selfish tourist asshats going over clearly demarked boundaries and fences to go swimming in dangerous seas. I think it was about 10 yrs ago, not sure, have to ask Ozzie friends, that two Australian men drowned trying to save a Singaporean tourist who deliberately hopped over a fence into a dangerous ocean place well sign posted and then got into trouble.

Meanwhile, start doing some planning for all the numbers of tourists you invited in. Be prepared to commit money to it. Kyoto etc want to have their mochi and eat it, sorry life doesn't work like that.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Paul - Maybe so, but lets update your comment to 'mannerless Mainland Chinese and Americans' shall we? That would be way more accurate in representing the problem.

Let’s update your comment to “mannerless people”, shall we?

BTW, the “manner” posters in Tokyo’s subways are directed at Japanese.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I know this is a slightly different issue, but in the UK I am sure I have heard from people that private residents in the Cotswolds (which again, isn't a tourist attraction) have been having to ask Japanese and Chinese tourists to stop entering their private property to take photos and selfies. I heard some residents have even made signs in Japanese/Chinese to tell tourists this. I know this is a slightly different issue, but it goes to stand that wherever tourists are, or are from, a small number will always break the rules or annoy locals for a photo.

I feel that in many of these scenarios it is always the larger groups of tourists who behave disrespectfully, regardless of nationality.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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