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Toyota to conduct spring traffic safety campaign April 1-May 31

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Toyota Motor Corp will conduct its annual spring traffic safety campaign from April 1 to May 31 to coincide with the Japanese national spring campaign running from May 11 to 20.

The Toyota campaign focuses on educating preschoolers about the dangers of running out into the street and traffic safety during low-light conditions. This year, Toyota will donate approximately 2.54 million traffic safety picture books to children beginning kindergarten or nursery school, as well as approximately 46,000 traffic safety storytelling card sets to kindergartens, nursery schools, libraries and children's facilities throughout the country.

In addition, Toyota will distribute around 950,000 low-light traffic safety awareness flyers to visitors to dealers and other outlets. The materials will be available online in Japanese at http://www.toyota.co.jp/ehon/ for home use. Toyota will also be giving away 20 child seats through the site.

A total of 416 companies, comprising vehicle dealers, logistics systems companies, forklift dealers, parts distributors and rental/lease dealers, will participate in Toyota's 2014 campaign.

Concerning the campaign, Toyota President Akio Toyoda said: "Traffic safety is a critical issue that we must continually address as a member of the automotive industry. To achieve our ultimate goal of eliminating traffic casualties, proper traffic safety education for drivers and pedestrians is just as important as the safety features on our vehicles. We will continue to work with the general public to realize a safe and secure traffic environment for our society."

This year marks the 47th year that Toyota has run the campaign, which began in 1969. To date, Toyota has donated approximately 136.23 million picture books and 1.52 million traffic safety storytelling card sets in Japan.

© JCN Newswire

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

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For those of you don't drive in Japan, traffic safety mean blocking lanes and forcing motorist to merge from three to two or two to one lane, during rush hour, to stop motorcyclist and hand the a pamphlet about safety and a stick of gum. Speaking from experience.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

"Toyota will donate approximately 2.54 million traffic safety picture books to children beginning kindergarten or nursery school"

But kids don't drive ... and we all know the most dangerous things on the road are motor vehicles not kids.

Lets spend a proportionate amount educating motorists to obey traffic signals, slow the hell down, and drive appropriately around pedestrians and cyclists. Motorists need to be reminded that roads are not the sole domain of motor vehicles and that they are to be shared with other road users no matter their chosen form of transport. Using speed weight and power to intimidate other road users should not be tolerated.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This year marks the 47th year that Toyota has run the campaign, which began in 1969. To date, Toyota has donated approximately 136.23 million picture books and 1.52 million traffic safety storytelling card sets in Japan.

Also, since 1969, going by World Health Organization data, there have been around 350,000 road traffic fatalities in Japan - with about 50%, or 175,000 of those killed being pedestrians or cyclists.

http://www.who.int/gho/road_safety/mortality/en/

Sorry Toyota, doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results is the definition of insanity.

Enough with the coloring book PR campaigns. Just give us safe streets - if better infrastructure inconveniences drivers and results in fewer car sales, well then so be it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I respect Toyota for doing their part, but shouldn't parents be teaching kids this? They should focus their campaign on educating PARENTS about road safety and use of car seats. And as I say every time, it would be nice if the police actually did their jobs a little more and actually caught more people not stoping at crosswalks, running red lights, jumping green lights, riding bicycles using electronic devices, etc.

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