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Traffic death toll in Tokyo 161 in 2015; lowest figure since World War II

15 Comments

The Tokyo Metropolitan Police Agency said Saturday that the death toll from traffic accidents, including pedestrians, in the Tokyo metropolitan area in 2015 was 161, 11 fewer than 2014 and the lowest number since World War II.

At the beginning of 2015, the police had said its target was to see the death toll drop below 150 and its slogan was “Challenge Under 150,” Fuji TV reported.

Of the fatalities, 40% were aged 65 or older. Five deaths were blamed on drunk drivers.

The highest figure for Tokyo was 1,179 deaths in 1960.

The National Police Agency will release national traffic fatality statistics next week.

© Japan Today

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15 Comments
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Hopefully we can see their definition of a traffic fatality too.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The whole move to switch to automated cars for safety is a fallacy.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

@Burning Bush

Automated cars aren't just about safety, you could read a book or do other things while your car drives. And we could improve traffic flow in general, time to destination etc.

What amazes me about this result is the leniency on seatbelt usage in Japan and yet a low death toll, probably some missing data here.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

This result is because of how they build cars today, improved emergency services combined with the fact that a traffic death in Japan is counted when someone dies within 24 hrs of the accident. But to have a more complete picture of road safety, we should also look at the number of traffic accidents and the number of different types of injuries.

A closer look at other statistics reveals something else. Though traffic deaths have declined, traffic accidents haven’t: from 661,000 in 1989 to 691,000 in 2011. More significantly, the number of traffic-related injuries has gone up, too: 815,000 in 1989 to 854,000 in 2011.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2012/05/13/national/media-national/road-death-stats-hide-the-truth/

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Of the fatalities, 40% were aged 65 or older.

Can we finally put that little nugget about older drivers being safer than younger drivers to bed now?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Can we finally put that little nugget about older drivers being safer than younger drivers to bed now?

Not when they include the numbers for pedestrians in the equation as well. Senior citizens account for a huge percentage of pedestrian deaths throughout Japan, and including them in vehicle numbers can be a bit misleading for statistic purposes.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Amazing! Good to hear! Good to know! OTSU KARE SAMA DESHITA to the one's concerned! Good job well done!

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

you could read a book or do other things while your car drives.

You'll be checking and responding to email from your boss.

After all, what excuse do you have not to respond to work email if you have a driverless car?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Also considering the fact that Japan had only 2.3M registered vehicles on the road back in 1960 vs over 81M vehicles in 2015. (JETRO)

4 ( +4 / -0 )

" “Challenge Under 150,”

Stupid name, and I doubt very much, given the nature of campaigns by police, that the campaign itself had little or nothing to do with it, but if fatalities were lower than normal, then good news.

Yubaru: "Not when they include the numbers for pedestrians in the equation as well. Senior citizens account for a huge percentage of pedestrian deaths throughout Japan, and including them in vehicle numbers can be a bit misleading for statistic purposes."

I think you're kind of proving the poster's point.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Would love to know how many were lack of wearing a seatbelt

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Gogogo.

Does it matter? 161 people are dead. No Compassion regardless if they wore a belt(which gives no 100% protection). Most die from side partial sideimpacts where the belts efficiency is reduced.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@It"S ME: My point is that no one seems to wear seatbelts in Japan, they are not cool and police don't enforce it.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Of the fatalities, 40% were aged 65 or older.

Can we finally put that little nugget about older drivers being safer than younger drivers to bed now?

What does your comment have to do with the quote?

My point is that no one seems to wear seatbelts in Japan

What a ridiculous comment.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Elderly people are less robust, thus more likely to die in an accident where younger people are more likely to survive and recover.

Apparently from your avatar gogogo, you're about 14 years old, so maybe you should ask your parents to take you to Japan so you can see everyone wearing seatbelts and the police checking for them.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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