national

Keisei Electric resumes train services halted by fires caused by typhoon-borne salt

5 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

5 Comments
Login to comment

Easy to blame something when you really don't know the answer. I have never heard of fires starting down here on electrical wires because of this reason, and we live on an island, and get far more typhoons than mainland, and salt build up is common.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Better keep this reason quiet before the UK train services start using this as an excuse too.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Gotta coat those insulators with a layer that resist salt build up.

Or pressure wash all the insulators after a direct hit of a huge typhoon.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Easy to blame something when you really don't know the answer. I have never heard of fires starting down here on electrical wires because of this reason, and we live on an island, and get far more typhoons than mainland, and salt build up is common.

The wires that power trains are different from regular power lines since they can’t be insulated from the elements (they have to make contact with the train’s pantograph to transmit the electricity). So I assume that would make them more vulnerable to this.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Salt becomes conductive when mixing with water. Since salt is made up of Na+ and Cl- ions, when mixed with water the water is the dispersion media for ions and electrons to move which allows conductance. As Rainyday said the conductors used to power trains are non insulated. The non-insulated conductor starts to track across the insulator (someones you can hear the corona or popping before a fault) and eventually will conduct enough electricity to operate the earth fault protective device and removing power.

There are insulators that are coated to resist this type of build up but they are not 100% effective. The railways do perform preventive maintenance and wash insulators but there are so darn many of them that immediately after this type of event it would be really hard to get out and wash them all down.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites