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Tsunami-hit Fukushima school opens as memorial to 2011 tragedy

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Pictures included with other media today would have been equally fitting here. Would encourage more people to visit. Sadly, neighbors have still not been given the “all clear” to return to their homes:

“*Locals were forced to evacuate from their homes for *an extended period.” - Hmpf!
1 ( +2 / -1 )

No students were lost at the school. The building should be demolished and replaced with a stone memorial. Places in Namie have high radiation levels. Some areas will be off-limits for many decades coming.

"Many of the children lost their families in the tsunami, but because of the brave and intelligent actions of the staff at Ukedo Elementary, not one child or staff member from the school died in the disaster. The following day, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant exploded and the town of Namie began its evacuation."

https://real-fukushima.com/projects/ukedo_es/

1 ( +2 / -1 )

There's no contamination still around that area ?

I find that hard to accept it's a safe place for children now or ever again

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

zichi:

The building should be demolished and replaced with a stone memorial. Places in Namie have high radiation levels.

Luckily (and through right preparation and response) nobody perished there. As such, the building can be preserved as a memorial and reminder to the power of nature. If you're implying it should be demolished because it is still radioactive - after 10 years and many decontaminatino steps it is not more radioactive than it was before the accident and you should stop fearmongering.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The building is a dangerous structure and not safe to enter so it can not be a museum. I am saying it should be demolished because it was destroyed by the tsunami and no one died there because of the quick actions of the teachers, unlike what happened at another school in Miyagi.

Keeping the destroyed school will not encourage former residents to return.

The whole area around the school was destroyed and is now a site for the massive storage of millions of tons of contaminated soil in thick plastic bags and covered with earth and the sites surrounded by high white walls. You can see them with Google Street. The land is no longer suitable for farming because of the salt from the sea water.

You can find the site on Google Maps and Google street and look at photos of the school for yourself.

I do not fearmonger about radiation. You can view the daily radiations levels for yourself. I did not say the area of the school still have levels of radiation.

I said, and which is correct, there are still areas of Futaba with high levels of radiation. Futaba District was divided into three zones. The area which residents could return to. An area which for the time being people can not return to but can visit their former homes but not stay overnight. An area which people will not be able to return to. All people are recommended to visiting that area.

Futaba is not the only location which still has high radiation. There are still many areas with radiation higher the legal limit od 0.25 mirco sieverts per hour. The legal limit on radiation exposure is 1 millisievert per year.

Former residents are not returning to their former communities in great numbers not only because of the fear of radiation but also because the infrastructures, such as schools, hospitals, transport and shops are all lacking. There is no work in the area since the businesses were also destroyed.

Today, if you look on the radiation map, I see in Futaba, but not near the school, radiation level of 2.2 microsievert per hour. In other parts of the Futaba District it is even higher at 5.6 microsievert per hour.

The decommission work did reduce the levels in some areas but not all of it.

Look for yourselves.

https://jciv.iidj.net/map/

Futaba is the area around the nuclear disaster site.

https://futaba-educ.net/english/about-futaba-distric

The government wants all former residents to return so it can claim the nuclear disaster is under control and safe.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I think Zichi is onto something in that this will cost a fortune to maintain as a monument, so that something smaller would be a better use of resources. Use the money saved on the local people, especially since Namie is not far from Dai-Ichi and the people there suffered the nuclear accident on top of the tsunami. Unlike other historical events, there is a ton of professional and amateur video of what happened on the day. Those videos are much better than simple objects and buildings at telling the story of the disaster(s).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The Update of Fukushima Daiichi NPS

You can also see the difficulty to return to the area.

https://www.meti.go.jp/english/earthquake/nuclear/decommissioning/pdf/20210304_FPCJ_METI.pdf

kohakuebisu

I think Zichi is onto something in that this will cost a fortune to maintain as a monument, so that something smaller would be a better use of resources. 

I did not say it will cost money. It's just abandoned in an area destroyed and also abandoned and full of sites of contaminated soils.

There are many digital records of the area including the school.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The fact that the area around the school is full of very large sites with contaminated soil indicates that the government had decided no one will ever live there again.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Sorry for my assumption. There is a high school that was preserved much further up the coast at Kesennuma, which looks like a great place to visit, but it was already struggling for funds and calling for government assistance before the pandemic. Damaged communities have enough to be dealing with without memorials weighing on their finances.

https://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXZQODG196GE0Z10C21A2000000/

If kids are to go on school trips to learn about the disaster, it's more logistically possible for them to visit this site in Namie in Fukushima. Kesennuma is an extra 200km each way. This shows the huge expanse of coastline hit by the tsunami.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

kohakuebisu

Sorry for my assumption. There is a high school that was preserved much further up the coast at Kesennuma, which looks like a great place to visit, but it was already struggling for funds and calling for government assistance before the pandemic. Damaged communities have enough to be dealing with without memorials weighing on their finances.

https://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXZQODG196GE0Z10C21A2000000/

A stone memorial needs very little maintenance.

If kids are to go on school trips to learn about the disaster, it's more logistically possible for them to visit this site in Namie in Fukushima. Kesennuma is an extra 200km each way. This shows the huge expanse of coastline hit by the tsunami

There is nothing to see. The property is closed off. Please use Google Maps and Google Street to see what the area looks like. Just lots of white walls hiding the contaminated school.

After the Kobe earthquake they built an earthquake museum near the Hyogo Prefecture Museum.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Should have said, just many endless white walls hiding the sites for the contaminated soils. One is at the rear of the school.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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