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Typhoon Nangka barrels toward Japan

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Much prefer the numbering system, we are in Japan, in the Pacific region. Typhoon number 11. Stay safe everyone.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

Time to go surfing...

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Time to go surfing...

No, no no! Get with the program: time to clamber upon the roof of your house so that your demise can make the JT.

-1 ( +4 / -4 )

Nangka, a Malaysian name for the Jack fruit,

this 'fruit' will also cost millions of Yen.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Laguna, you don't know what I'm talking about. When I say time to go surfing, I'm serious:

https://youtu.be/aUwueh5YBpo

1 ( +3 / -2 )

UK9 - the naming system is used in the west pacific region (as it is in others) by almost all of the typhoon affected countries. Each country submits names they deem suitable. Usually they choose names associated with nature but not always. Typhoon # 8 this year was a Japanese name - Kujira. There are a few anomalies (not all follow the system in the media) but generally the system is used to avoid confusion and to give a clear identitiy to each individual typhoon. In fact if you open the JMA(Japan Meteoroligical Agency) site you'll see # 11 officially referred to as NANGKA and the next, # 12 as HALOLA.

Everyone remembers Hurricane Katrina - but I doubt they'd recall it as - oh yeah, # 11 or whatever number.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

From what I know typhoons are named by the country in whose territory they originate as well as numbered.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

@some14some

A bit like one of those watermelon auctions, then.....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's Me - they are named in succession from a pre-determined list regardless of the territory of origin.

This name - Nangka - was decided ages ago.

As I said, the next one is Halola and the following one - yet to be spawned is Soudelor followed by Molave followed by.....!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Most of them "originate" in the middle of the Pacific Ocean so, how does your theory work again?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

anywhere near Tajhi?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

These typhoons rarely live up to the hype. As above, it's always a "powerful" typhoon. I don't recall ever reading about "lame" or "usual" or even "moderate" typhoons approaching, though that's usually how they actually appear.

Not that I want a powerful typhoon, but the regular hype eventually causes everyone to let their guard down when a truly powerful typhoon appears.

2 ( +4 / -1 )

6 p.m. Thursday, July 16, Japan time: Nangka is rapidly losing its power as it tracks north toward projected landfall over southeastern Kyushu about 1 to 2 a.m. Friday. It barely remains a Category 1-equivalent typhoon, http://www.stripes.com/blogs/pacific-storm-tracker/pacific-storm-tracker-1.257110/typhoon-11w-nangka-41-1.356158

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

These typhoons rarely live up to the hype. As above, it's always a "powerful" typhoon. I don't recall ever reading about "lame" or "usual" or even "moderate" typhoons approaching, though that's usually how they actually appear.

Mainland unlike Okinawa is ill prepared to face strong typhoons. A strong typhoon is determined by the pressure at it's center, and also by the overall size of the storm.

The ground in mainland is for the most part volcanic ash based, which is very loose and is susceptible to heavy rains that can and often do cause massive landslides. The base in Okinawa is different and the water typically runs off. Plus mainland houses are typically made or have wood foundations, unlike Okinawa and it's steel reinforced concrete.

Mainland suffers way more damage, and this storm is potentially dangerous. Better to be safe than sorry.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Stay safe everyone.

Will do. I've made the decision not to live at the foot of a soggy mountain or go for a stroll along a swollen river with both feet in the water.

This is 2015. No one has died an unpreventable death in a Typhoon since about then.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Cue the media circus! Tokyo-bound trains will be delightful tomorrow morning! /sarcasm

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@commanteer

You may be right about the Kanto Area having too much hype, but these things cause destruction and loss of life in Okinawa (including the various islands like Ishigaki, Iriomote, Yoron, Miyakojima, Tanegashima ) and Kyushu.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

These typhoons rarely live up to the hype. As above, it's always a "powerful" typhoon. I don't recall ever reading about "lame" or "usual" or even "moderate" typhoons approaching, though that's usually how they actually appear.

Man, let me tell you, I live near the oldest wooden structure in the World which goes to show that no powerful typhoon has done anything in this area in 1300 years. Yet shops close up and people like the apocalypse is approaching.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

but these things cause destruction and loss of life in Okinawa -

Please tell me when was the last time anyone in Okinawa lost their life due to a typhoon? I've been here over 3 decades and I can not recall ONE single person dying because of a typhoon, unlike mainland which has old folks climbing up on their houses to fix roof tiles during the middle of one and getting blown off down to their deaths.

If anything in Okinawa we are quite used to them and are better prepared to handle them then mainland...by far.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Hi all, Kochi, 22:07 all windows shuttered, wind is up, no rain. humidity is bearable. but could be the lull before the storm ,,,

1 ( +1 / -0 )

it'sonly

Looks like it's heading your way. Take care!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Matsuyama, Shikoku here... Little windy and light rain with bands of heavy rain here and there, but basically nothing to worry- very much business as usual here.

(The mountains south and east of us block almost all typhoons that hit Kochi)

..we won't see anything until it's past us and the southside of the typhoon swings at us.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I had planned on going to a festival. Down a few "super dry's" & get me a couple Ika-yaki's (Grilled Squid) and enjoy the summertime. Dang this typhoon! Way too much rain so far this summer?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

We had some heavy rain and wind in Tokyo last night, still occasional rain and wind today.

Kanto does seem to avoid most effects of the typhoons. Eastern Japan tends to get hit a lot heavier.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hi Luca xx.. it is blowing a tad, air con on 21 can't sleep otherwise, no rain but sky looks ominous...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

UK9393: "Much prefer the numbering system, we are in Japan, in the Pacific region. Typhoon number 11. Stay safe everyone."

The problem with THE numbering system is that there is not just one -- many countries have different numbers. For example, if you watched Hong Kong news Typhoon #10 according to the Japanese Meteorological Agency was Typhoon #9. Then there's the whole "Philippines Area of Responsibility", which doesn't even track storms outside its exclusive zone, and then still other names/numbers assigned based on where they form. So, it is quite convenient to have this naming system, decided by all the weather agencies in Asia (more or less) and put into effect in 2000. While there's not much room for doubt about what storm people are talking about if a flight is inbound for Japan and they say, "Be careful of typhoon 11" it sure would have been confusing last week when three storms were formed in the Pacific and all roughly above the Philippines. Right now #12 is being called Halola for the time being, which is from another list altogether because of where it formed. Confusing, but the current naming system is the least confusing since it is being used by most countries in unison internationally and not just their own individual systems.

In any case, we finally got the strong wind warning here in Osaka. Hang in there people, especially those in Shikoku right now.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Just in at Kansai-delayed 40 minutes only Had a couple of screams above cloud cover with turbulence but the ground winds were not bad and had a great landing.....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Had a couple of screams above cloud cover with turbulence

Woe-woe. . . . I hate scary flights too. Glad you had a great landing. Typhoons- Mother Nature letting us all know how small we really are-

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Oh thank goodness we don't have many "This is nothing. It's not even raining outside" people this time. The night is young, though...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The surf has been wonderful for a week. I have been in it!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@JapanGal. K, cool. But I hope U don't mean 1.5~2m waves. That's for beginners/ intermediate. Ever caught a wave so powerful that it broke the leash from ur ankle or wrist? Sheesh- its tha' worst though-

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Japangal, u in Tokyo? Chiba's Sotobo area is never disappointing during such excellent weather.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The problem with THE numbering system is that there is not just one -

When in Japan, do as the Japanese....as the saying goes.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

smithinjapan - succinctly put.

However as I posted earlier, Halola is not from another list altogether because of where it's formed.

Meanwhile - around here - Shikoku - we had a lot of rain but fortunately the 150+km winds didn't hit us.

Anyone who thinks they can take typhoon warnings lightly, do so at their own peril and stupidity. Disaster warnings are that - warnings. If the worst case scenario doesn't eventuate we should be relieved and happy - not condemning authorities as "Wrong Again!" as some posters have inclined.

I do agree though some officials can be a little over zealous, esp re school closures, but who'd want to be on the end of the wrath of society for understating a potentially disasterous event when tragedy occurs.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

browny1: "However as I posted earlier, Halola is not from another list altogether because of where it's formed."

It is, actually. Granted, it should be named Soudelor (the Micronesian name for the god of Pomp-hai, or whatever) once it reaches typhoon status, but before that it is generally not named unless it is formed between 140 and 185 degrees W in the Pacific, and above a certain point of the Equator (outside of the Philippines zone of Responsibility). They are simply tagged with a number in the Japanese system and called a tropical depression or cyclone internationally (with the assigned name later). Halola is from the CPRC separate list (I think I have the abbreviation wrong) for those formed within the boundaries I mentioned.

I agree with you completely on your points about how being safer is far more important than understating the dangers, as we have seen that too much in many places, and I see nothing wrong with a lot of the severity of the warnings. Two people have already been found dead, and if there are landslides or the usual stupidity of going up on the roofs when the typhoon hits certain areas we'll see more yet. Schools I know that had closing ceremonies listed for today did a good job preparing for cancellation and had all the necessary stuff done on Thursday instead (to the detriment of the teachers, but can't be helped).

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

smithy - thanks.

My meaning was Halola is not from another list , but in fact is from the same list as this typhoon - Nangka.

In my first post I mentioned this naming system is used in the west pacific - a loose description of the zone.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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