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U.S. Ospreys win Japanese hearts and minds with quake relief flights

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By Tim Kelly

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And the reason why these Ospreys can't be permanently stationed in Kyushu is??????

0 ( +13 / -13 )

Whereas last week the story of Osprey deliveries was slanted to include apparently ungrateful opposition to their deployment this one sounds straight out of Osprey PR Central.

11 ( +18 / -7 )

What's there to win? Japanese people don't have any say whether or not there are Ospreys here.

10 ( +15 / -5 )

ThePBot I don't get your question, but there is no US Marine Corps air station in Kyushu, so there is no place to keep them.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

Moon raker: "Whereas last week the story of Osprey deliveries was slanted to include apparently ungrateful opposition to their deployment this one sounds straight out of Osprey PR Central."

Exactly! What it did succeed in doing was proving that many posters on here who claim to be 'the voice of the people' in Okinawa don't care about people and their plight whatsoever, but about petty politics, suggesting bases are not needed or these helicopters a danger to the people who needed supplies.

The helicopters haven't changed, but clearly some anxious people now see how they can be an asset, and I'm happy they were used to help people and the American military kindly helped out.

14 ( +22 / -8 )

Pretty impressive piece of machinery.

Yes, it had some crashes and limitations but most military equip!ment have a worse record.

It is a good craft and works well in Disaster situations as they have shown in previous deployments. Not sure how the MV-22 varies from the CV-22 as the Marines tend to order a modified Version of their Crafts.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

Very true Smith. Great post.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Pretty tasteless, using a tragedy to "sell" your ideas... this piece almost smells of propaganda.

-12 ( +13 / -24 )

If the people on Mainland Japan like them so much then why not relocate MCAS Futenma and all of the other Marine bases to the Mainland. This is just another example of Mainland Japanese wanting the U.S. Military to defend them and help them in the case of Natural Disasters but wanting to keep the burden of actually hosting the bases and all of the problems that goes with them on the people of Okinawa.

-7 ( +6 / -11 )

Exactly! What it did succeed in doing was proving that many posters on here who claim to be 'the voice of the people' in Okinawa don't care about people and their plight whatsoever, but about petty politics, suggesting bases are not needed or these helicopters a danger to the people who needed supplies.

I wish I could give you more thumbs up.

Pretty tasteless, using a tragedy to "sell" your ideas... this piece almost smells of propaganda.

It wasn't done for propaganda, it was done because it is one of the most effective ways to help people in need.

the people on Mainland Japan like them so much then why not relocate MCAS Futenma and all of the other Marine bases to the Mainland. This is just another example of Mainland Japanese wanting the U.S. Military to defend them and help them in the case of Natural Disasters but wanting to keep the burden of actually hosting the bases and all of the problems that goes with them on the people of Okinawa

The US and Japan agreed that the US would be able to keep their installations in Okinawa. Japan has their hands tied on that one and the US is not willing to give it up.

Okinawa geographically allows the US to quickly respond to anything that occurs from as far south as Thailand and as far north as Hokkaido. Hence why the US won't relocate.

The problems are far and few between, very few Okinawans complain and it's just overhyped through the media reporting.
8 ( +11 / -3 )

How is it better than the large helicopters? Honest question.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

In the last two paragraphs they suddenly and without warning talk about one Osprey only. Is this a separate article grafted on here, I wonder?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Reckless, it has a longer range and higher speed because it transitions to conventional fixed wing.

It has a liability in that the two engines are not linked on a single power train like a CH46 or 47 so the loss of one engine is more likely to result in a crash. There is also a critical point during transition where the craft can neither glide nor auto-rotate if failures happen.

4 ( +6 / -1 )

oh dear the anti-base people are a little butthurt as theres one less excuse they can use to justify there propaganda. the Osprey will be used by the JSDF in the coming years and for many year to come. no other aircraft can get supplies into cutoff areas (no runways) as quickly as an Osprey, and that includes the Chinnook

4 ( +6 / -3 )

Jim.

The engines are linked loss of one means reduced performance as the remaiming engine now powers both Rotors but it can still fly.

As was said in Disaster/Rescue speed and time is off the essence, I can see it do mountain, etc Rescue and might be an asset for the Coast Guard too.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@smith

The helicopters haven't changed, but clearly some anxious people now see how they can be an asset...

It's not a helicopter. Think of it as propeller version of a harrier.

-1 ( +2 / -4 )

Pretty tasteless, using a tragedy to "sell" your ideas... this piece almost smells of propaganda.

Genuine question, specially, when you can read that cold statement :

The deployment has also given the Japanese military a chance to see how the Osprey fits with its kit. Japan ordered five Ospreys last year, making it the first foreign force to buy it.:

You must be very heartless to call a tragedy "a chance", a chance for the Japanese military. I suggest US military to tone down the propaganda as it sounds really excessive and misplaced.

-1 ( +3 / -5 )

Checked the Specs, auto-rotation was never a requirement but it can glide for some distance.

What Tragedy, they served well in other Disaster areas.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

posts 2,3,4,5,6 EXACTLY!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

So, all these 'naysayers' have shut up for now. It's pretty standard in Japan. They all whinge and complain about the US presence in Japan until they need them and then, they say nothing. How about a thank you?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

ThePBot I don't get your question, but there is no US Marine Corps air station in Kyushu, so there is no place to keep them.

Yeah because my question is above you. You know what I take that back. What I meant to ask is why don't they build a station there then since they love them so much. I bet there'll be no protests against it like what's happening in Okinawa.....

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

The article is incorrect as to the number of Ospreys that were deployed. The actual number was 4, not 8. In addition to the 4 Ospreys, 2 C-130 Hercules were also deployed to transport SDF members and military vehicles. Thanks to this, a total 37 tons of relief supplies were transported to quake-stricken areas. But can't the SDF deal with such relief operations all by itself without the help of the U.S. and also without requesting the use of Ospreys?

Note an Osprey's maximum loading capacity is 20 tons and yet the four carried a total 37 tons of load in the week-long operations, each carrying 9.25 tons in the average. Doesn't this mean they were deployed merely for political demonstration?

-7 ( +2 / -8 )

“The more exposure you get to any weapon system aircraft I think the better it is going to be,” Dasmalchi said.

The cold reality of the weapon seller advertisement , almost wishing for more tragedy to happen, a little like if a doctor will say a patient before leaving the room..."see you soon".

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

voiceofokinawaAPR. 27, 2016 - 12:24PM JST

Thanks to this, a total 37 tons of relief supplies were transported to quake-stricken areas. But can't the SDF deal with such relief operations all by itself without the help of the U.S. and also without requesting the use of Ospreys?

Yes, it could. JSDF had enough of idle CH47 helicopters, which were better fit for the operations to carry supplies between short distances. Neighboring Fukuoka, Saga, and Nagasaki cities were all intact and all within 100 km radius.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Beyond emotional episodes of relief efforts, the operation was utilized with the aim of increasing military cooperation between Japan and the U.S. The deployment took further step of joint operation between the U.S. military and the SDF, and of the use of civilian airports. The use of civilian facilities by militaries, landing and so forth, also became a practice in the event of an emergency in the Korean peninsula. There is no doubt that the troops provided the aid to the people with their hard and faithful effort, for which the residents are deeply thankful. The military was utilized as a tool for diplomacy and it is unlikely that this type of diplomacy comes as the result of only good intentions.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Kind-hearted Ospreys Give Aid And Backrubs To Kumamoto Citizens http://www.therisingwasabi.com/kind-hearted-ospreys-give-aid-and-backrubs-to-kumamoto-citizens/

0 ( +1 / -1 )

sfjp330APR. 27, 2016 - 01:26PM JST

The use of civilian facilities by militaries, landing and so forth, also became a practice in the event of an emergency in the Korean peninsula.

Korean Peninsula has nothing to do with it. Due to article 9 of Japanese constitution, JSDF will stay neutral when a war or an armed conflict breaks out in Korean Peninsula. Use of civilian facilities in Japan for the war efforts is out of the question.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Pretty tasteless, using a tragedy to "sell" your ideas... this piece almost smells of propaganda.

Well, the JSDF better stop giving aid during these disasters too. Since, you know, their primary purpose is to defend the country against invaders, not to provide disaster relief. That would be just propaganda to justify their existence.

There is nothing wrong with using a superior technology to provide much quicker relief to those that are in need. Certainly, the Osprey's primary purpose is to provide logistics to military personnel and supplies. But it is perfectly okay to use it in this manner as well.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

CH3CHO APR. 27, 2016 - 01:49PM JST Due to article 9 of Japanese constitution, JSDF will stay neutral when a war or an armed conflict breaks out in Korean Peninsula.

Of course, Abe is within his right to push for Constitutional revision if he so wishes. If it goes through all the legal hoops, and passes at a referendum, then fine, then it will be Japanese peoples choice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good job, Ospreys and crew but the people will only be happy until there is another accident.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Around the world and almost on a daily basis the U.S. Military is conducting humanitarian operations. Back in the 1950's when we took over the role you'd often read stories in U.S. Newspapers about those efforts. Now... so much of what the military does goes unannounced in the USA itself. I guess my point is.... we're not over here in the USA gloating over our ability... it is simply is done and little made of it. So just appreciate it for what it is, help for an ally in need.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Well, the JSDF better stop giving aid during these disasters too. Since, you know, their primary purpose is to defend the country against invaders

According to the Self-Defence Law, the primary purpose of the SDF is to protect the peace and independence of the country (わが国の平和と独立を守る). No explicit mention of invaders. Lots of mentions of disaster relief - the word 災害 appears 54 times.

http://law.e-gov.go.jp/htmldata/S29/S29HO165.html

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

And the reason why these Ospreys can't be permanently stationed in Kyushu is?????? Itazuke AB closed over thirty years ago. I was stationed there in the early 1960s.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It is good the Osprey were able to help deliver supplies, but some of the key issues in Okinawa is about the noise, practicing in a UNESCO forest and necessity of basing these machines in Futenma which is very close to residential areas. The Osprey are very noisy aircraft and shutter buildings nearby so it is better to locate them in larger airports such as Iwakuni than in Okinawa from what I have seen. More info on the issue in Takae a beautiful place can be found here: http://nohelipadtakae.org/Takae-handout-english-final.pdf

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

According to the Self-Defence Law, the primary purpose of the SDF is to protect the peace and independence of the country (わが国の平和と独立を守る). No explicit mention of invaders. Lots of mentions of disaster relief - the word 災害 appears 54 times.

This was different from my understanding, so I re-read over the law. The whole sentence reads 自衛隊は、我が国の平和と独立を守り、国の安全を保つため、直接侵略及び間接侵略に対し我が国を防衛することを主たる任務とし、必要に応じ、公共の秩序の維持に当たるものとする。 (sorry it's a little long). The SDF is to protect the peace and independence of the country by protecting against foreign invasion, both direct and indirect.

There is a lot of mention of disaster relief, in that the law specifies in what circumstances the SDF can be used for disaster relief.

This being said, I am grateful that military resources can be used for disaster relief, whether it be the SDF or the U.S. Armed Forces, even if it isn't their primary purpose for existing. In a perfect world, disaster relief and other peaceful operations would be more front and center of all their actions (although their names would certainly be changed).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

peter qindai: "It's not a helicopter. Think of it as propeller version of a harrier."

Semantics.

voiceofokinawa: "Doesn't this mean they were deployed merely for political demonstration?"

Once again, the only person on here bringing politics into RESCUE AND RELIEF is YOU! Talk about ungrateful and a person not at all representing the voice of the people. If you honestly were the voice of the people you would say thank you for the help, not sit there and be angry and make up underlying motives, insulting not only the international efforts, but the people of Kumamoto and those you purport to represent in Okinawa as well. Shame on you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

sfjp330APR. 27, 2016 - 02:01PM JST

CH3CHO APR. 27, 2016 - 01:49PM JST Due to article 9 of Japanese constitution, JSDF will stay neutral when a war or an armed conflict breaks out in Korean Peninsula.

Of course, Abe is within his right to push for Constitutional revision if he so wishes.

No. Abe's ambition is limited to using JSDF to evacuate Japanese nationals from Korea, when South Korea is run over by North Korea or China. This is not Korea hating. South Korea does not want any military aid from Japan, and Japanese constitution does not allow use of force overseas as a means of foreign policy.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

How is it better than the large helicopters? Honest question. here are the comparisons between the Osprey and the Chinook,

Range 879 to 230miles Cruise speed 262 to 170 knots carry capacity 14000lb to 24000lb

while the Chinnok can carry almost double the weight of the Osprey it burns 4 times as much fuel per mile traveled, Osprey can be refueled in flight almost doubling its range, so the Osprey can travel almost 4 times as far burning 1/4 of the fuel and getting there 50% faster. doesnt take a rocket scientist to understand the advantages of the Osprey over heavy lift helicopters

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Didn't anybody think that bringing up "joint ops practice, "Abe's Spearhead" and "extending (the JMSDF reach) beyond home waters," in an article about Winning Hearts and Minds of Japan through humanitarian disaster aid, (with no mention of any Japanese persons opinion at all) might just confirm the widely held suspicion of ulterior motives with the Osprey deployment?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

this one sounds straight out of Osprey PR Central

Stars and Wipes

According to the Self-Defence Law, the primary purpose of the SDF is to protect the peace and independence of the country (わが国の平和と独立を守る). No explicit mention of invaders. Lots of mentions of disaster relief - the word 災害 appears 54 times.

Kinda to be independent when you've been invaded.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

wtfjapanAPR. 27, 2016 - 04:20PM JST

Because we have everything needed in Fukuoka, Saga or Nagasaki, any of which is less than 100 km or 65 miles from Kumamoto. Ch47 Chinook is much better for short distance.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

voiceofokinawa: "Doesn't this mean they were deployed merely for political demonstration?"

Only one bringing political demonstration into this is you. The US helps, you complain. The people are happy about it, you complain. I'm sorry if what happened in Kyushu throws a wrench into you anti-base agenda, but your personal politics clearly do NOT represent the people when you are more concerned about the potential politics of vehicles being used to carry aid than you are about the aid itself getting to where it needs to be.

It's like I and others have said already, it's astounding that people would be upset about other countries helping and/or using Ospreys when they should be simply thanked for helping.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I'm more interested to know what other short take off and landing (STOL) planes Japan has? Twin Otters? C-130's? SK sent in a C-130. DHC's are used around the world, in its native Canada as well as Australia and host of island countries. Probably everywhere. Also the old de Havilland's are being rebuilt and new models built in BC under Viking. They've also been built around the world under licensing. They're quite common for passenger, cargo and medivac uses.

It remains a mystery what planes Japan has for the needs of STOL for rescue services that would be more locally available rather than coming all the way from Okinawa. The lack of other vehicles is what makes this a PR stunt rather than just another part of a rescue operation

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Smith, I'm sorry but I think you are smart enough to be able to separate the fine work done by the USMC in Kumamoto from political machinations (much) further up the chain of command.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

“The more exposure you get to any weapon system aircraft I think the better it is going to be,” Dasmalchi said.

Whaaaaaaat???

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

kurumazaka: "Smith, I'm sorry but I think you are smart enough to be able to separate the fine work done by the USMC in Kumamoto"

Better than that, I know when to say thanks instead of questioning the motives of everyone, as some posters are doing. The bottom line one that the people directly involved and being helped are HAPPY with what they've received. What right do we have to tell them they were duped and the help they got was a conspiracy, etc.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Smith is on fire today. Spot on, mate!

It remains a mystery what planes Japan has for the needs of STOL for rescue services that would be more locally available rather than coming all the way from Okinawa. The lack of other vehicles is what makes this a PR stunt rather than just another part of a rescue operation

STOL doesn't really matter much in this case. Given the terrain of a lot of areas and damage to roads and rail they needed to use vertical take off and landing aircraft. They could have thrown 50 CH-47's at the situation but it would have turned into a logistical and air coordination nightmare. The osprey is a better choice hands down. They were able to do more with less and delivered a lot of supplies to people in need much faster.

The US volunteered to assist and after recalculating the need Japan decided to accept the aide, bottom line. There's no conspiracy or stunts behind it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@CH3CHO Because we have everything needed in Fukuoka, Saga or Nagasaki, any of which is less than 100 km or 65 miles from Kumamoto. Ch47 Chinook is much better for short distance. oh OK so your more butthurt over the use of the use of the Osprey instead of the Chinook beasue it shows the J public its a perfectly safe and efficient aircraft!? oh the primary use of a Chinook and Osprey is for warefare where speed and range to the battlefield is paramount

2 ( +2 / -0 )

smithinjapan,

Let me repeat the last paragraph in my post above with the question part deleted. I said:

“Note an Osprey's maximum loading capacity is 20 tons and yet the four carried a total 37 tons of load in the week-long operations, each carrying 9.25 tons in the average.”

The figure 9.25 (tons) divided by 7 (days) is 1.32 (tons per diem). In other words, each aircraft transported 1.32 tons of relief supplies, or only one twentieth of their full capacity, to disaster areas each day. What's your explanation of this discrepancy?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

wtfjapanAPR. 27, 2016 - 06:30PM JST

OK so your more butthurt over the use of the use of the Osprey instead of the Chinook beasue it shows the J public its a perfectly safe and efficient aircraft!?

As I have written in this thread, JSDF has about 70 CH47 Chinooks, most of which were idle during the time.

What is the point of not using the JSDF helicopters to make room for US Ospreys?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

In an article from the Marine Corps Times (not associated with the Marine Corps) posted on April 21 http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/story/military/2016/04/21/japan-earthquake-aid-marines-rescue-efforts-victims/83277764/

In a three-hour period Tuesday, Marines delivered 18,000 pounds of food, water and other supplies, bringing the total aid to 65,000 pounds thus far, according to the 31st MEU.

The US Marine's Osprey began assisting on April 18th so within three days they delivered 65,000lbs of supplies. It takes a lot of chinooks to have that output. Not to mention, just turning on one aircraft is expensive.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

CrucialSAPR. 27, 2016 - 06:57PM JST

The US Marine's Osprey began assisting on April 18th so within three days they delivered 65,000lbs of supplies. It takes a lot of chinooks to have that output.

According to Wikipedia, one CH47 Chinook can carry 21,000 lbs of goods, whereas one Osprey can carry 20,000 lbs for STOL and less for vertical takeoff.

One CH47 can carry more than one Osprey can.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Voiceofokinawa: on this and other threads about the Is military helping you have been nothing but angry and asking questions about motives, then blaming those helping for playing politics. Again, what right do you have to question he use of aircraft and political motives when those directly involved, especially those being helped (and not sitting at a computer), have been satisfied as to the safety and efficacy of the craft, and are happy with the military help.

Sounds like some of you are more upset about the help than the disaster that created the need for it. Not a very 'voice off the people' when you're upset about their happiness. Since you insist on bringing in politics, don't forget about the US aid and your anger at it the next one you oppose their presence in something actually related.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Stop arguing!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As cool as the V-22 Osprey may be (the Marine Corps. love it), the next generation tilt-rotor successor, the V-280 Valor is even better. I saw a static V-280 on display at Heli-Expo -- very impressive.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

ThePBotApr. 27, 2016 - 07:07AM JST And the reason why these Ospreys can't be permanently stationed in Kyushu is??????

ONE- No USMC air stations in Kyushu, TWO- There will be JGSDF Ospreys at Kumamoto Airport in the near future, where they current keep CH-47s.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I was involved in this effort so know a little about it. After the earthquake occurred, the Japanese government established its joint task force to begin rescue efforts. The JSDF, police, and fire depts immediately started rescue operations looking for those trapped in buildings and landslides. The GOJ asked US forces to assist with two missions; to bring needed supplies to cut-off areas, and to transport JSDF forces from Hokkaido down to Kumamoto to augment the Western Army. Ospreys with their speed and range were the best platforms to perform the supply mission – 8 deployed from Futenma with 4 going to the Kumamoto airport and 4 staging at Iwakuni Air Station. Ospreys were to perform this mission until the initial areas were supplied then by that time JGSDF Chinooks would be able to be brought in from other areas to perform this role. The Ospreys also refueled on the JSMSDF Hyuga shortening flight times and allowing more flights. US C-130s brought down both troops and equipment from Hokkaido flying two missions per day, when weather permitted.

By last Fri, the GOJ concluded US support was no longer needed and stated no further requests would be made. All involved concluded it was very successful. Cut-off areas were quickly supplied with food, water and other supplies that were needed. JSDF forces that could have done this mission were able to be used in more time-critical rescue operations helping locate and save personnel.

Those few here who belittle, criticize or attempt to skew the life-saving efforts of both US and Japanese military and civilian forces merely show their lack of reason, compassion and humanity.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It's like I and others have said already, it's astounding that people would be upset about other countries helping and/or using Ospreys when they should be simply thanked for helping.

If my family and I were hungry, in dire straights and needing food and water and medical help, I wouldnt care if it was the devil himself delivering it.

It's the people all safe and cozy behind their computers that would bitch at me for accepting it, and in their way of thinking my family should die first. I am not sorry either, SCREW THEM, my families lives come first, I can deal with the politics later when they and I are safe!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The focus is delivering food. Any effort to tie this to promoting an aircraft cheapens the effort the troops are making. I really think the troops themselves are thinking only about helping out, not about sales promotions.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

smithinjapan

You haven't answered the question I posed. Unless you can explain and clarify the discrepancy I pointed out between the 4 Ospreys’ full loading capacities (560 tons = 20 x 4 x 7) and the actual loading they carried out (37 tons), you cannot blame me by saying I'm simply playing politics. If you insist on saying I'm playing politics, then you must answer the question first and foremost.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Readers, please stop bickering.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pretty tasteless, using a tragedy to "sell" your ideas... this piece almost smells of propaganda.

Meh. Armed forces the world over have PR units that have a primary purpose of showing how the military doesn't just kill people, but can help them too when it's needed. Were you just as disgusted over the PR units deployed during "Operation Tomodachi"?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I suppose 直接侵略及び間接侵略 does refer to invaders...missed that. (Raps self over knuckles)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Unless you can explain and clarify the discrepancy I pointed out between the 4 Ospreys’ full loading capacities (560 tons = 20 x 4 x 7) and the actual loading they carried out (37 tons), you cannot blame me by saying I'm simply playing politics.

This question is absolutely ridiculous and without meaning - asked by someone who is merely trying to turn a successful bilateral humanitarian effort that saved lives, and skew it to fit his/her own virulent anti-US alternate reality.

The Ospreys carried 37 tons of supplies because that was what was requested to be lifted by the Government of Japan (based on needs at the cut-off sites) and could fit within the aircraft - each Osprey carried its max cabin load of two 463L pallets of supplies. The fact that these supplies didn't weigh up to the max carrying capacity of the aircraft is totally irrelevant - it was what was delivered to the Ospreys by the GOJ to carry based on the needs of the people at these outlying areas. As an example, a pallet of water and a pallet of blue sheeting (to cover roofs) doesn't weight 20,000 lbs.

I provide this answer not to these anti-US posters but for others that may desire to know.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

lincolnman,

The Ospreys carried 37 tons of supplies because that was what was requested to be lifted by the Government of Japan (based on needs at the cut-off sites) and could fit within the aircraft - each Osprey carried its max cabin load of two 463L pallets of supplies.

Thank you for the information. Probably, you are in a position to ask for information from the Marine authorities off hand.

But a question still remains. If a total 37 tons was the amount the Japanese government requested to be transported to cut-off areas, was it necessary to deploy 4 Ospreys plus 2 C-130's for starters? Couldn't JSDF deal with the problem all by itself? And indeed this was the initial reaction Abe made when he heard about a U.S. offer to help.

Relief supplies in the amount of 20 tons were delivered on the first day. So the remaining 17 tons was transported by 4 Ospreys for the period of 6 days.

As I said elsewhere, a most difficult problem awaits when the reconstruction of infrastructure starts in a full swing. The amount of reconstruction money may know no bounds, I’m sure. So it's surprising that despite the quake disasters in Tohoku and Kyushu no one here who proclaim themselves to be philanthropic and humanitarian says anything about host-nation support Japan has to pay to the U.S. coffers (annual $1.56 billion) and expected $15 billion Japanese taxpayers are supposed to pay for the construction of a new base in Henoko, Nago City.

In my opinion, that relief effort for reconstruction is more humanitarian than merely sending in four Ospreys.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

For other posters that may be interested;

But a question still remains. If a total 37 tons was the amount the Japanese government requested to be transported to cut-off areas, was it necessary to deploy 4 Ospreys plus 2 C-130's for starters? Couldn't JSDF deal with the problem all by itself?

Japanese government representatives directed the rescue/recovery effort. The GOJ requested the US to assist by performing supply deliveries to cut-off areas in Kumamoto and to bring down additional JGSDF members from Hokkaido. They US did not ask the GOJ why - as a trusted friend and partner, it just met the GOJ request as quickly and as efficiently as it could so lives could be saved.

As I said elsewhere, a most difficult problem awaits when the reconstruction of infrastructure starts in a full swing. The amount of reconstruction money may know no bounds, I’m sure. So it's surprising that despite the quake disasters in Tohoku and Kyushu no one here who proclaim themselves to be philanthropic and humanitarian says anything about host-nation support Japan has to pay to the U.S. coffers (annual $1.56 billion) and expected $15 billion Japanese taxpayers are supposed to pay for the construction of a new base in Henoko, Nago City.

First, this poster criticizes the US relief support as a political event and offers no gesture of appreciation. Then, even though the US undertook these humanitarian relief efforts, he/she now says the US is not “doing enough” and should offer to waive any GOJ host nation support. Ridiculous. And as I have stated more than once, none of the host nation support funding the GOJ provides to US stationing costs goes to “US coffers”. It all remains in Japan and goes to Japanese construction, utilities and transportation companies - not one yen goes to the US. Perhaps this poster should ask these Japanese companies to help their fellow citizens and take their GOJ money and contribute it to the recovery effort.

As I have said before, those that skew and criticize this life-saving humanitarian operation show a basic lack of humanity. One should consider and judge their posts on other issues/articles based on this character flaw.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

lincolnman,

And as I have stated more than once, none of the host nation support funding the GOJ provides to US stationing costs goes to “US coffers”. It all remains in Japan and goes to Japanese construction, utilities and transportation companies - not one yen goes to the US.

The budged the U.S. side calls "host nation support" is called "sympathy budged" in Japan because Tokyo sympathized with Washington for a budgetary crisis it was under in the early 1970's and started paying Japanese base employees' salaries for Washington. The money does not go directly to the U.S. coffers, as you say, but certainly it helps reduce U.S. taxpayers' burden because, by nature, Japanese base employees' salaries, base maintenance costs such as repairs, water and utility must be all borne by the U.S. government.

So in a situation like this where disaster after disaster hit and afflict Japan, the U.S. must rethink about forcing the sympathy budged or host nation support upon the Japanese, that include disaster-stricken people in Tohoku and now in Kyushu. The budged Japanese taxpayers shoulder amounts to $1.56 billion annually. In addition, Washington is urging Tokyo to construct a new base in Henoko for dilapidated Futenma Air Station, the cost of which is estimated to be well over $10 billion.

Toyota or Honda U.S.A. cannot demand such costs as maintenance, salaries, utility and water be borne by the U.S. taxpayers, saying the money goes to U.S. employees, construction and utility companies after all.

Now, according to the April 19 Nikkei Shimbun, 4 Futenma-based Ospreys flew to Iwakuni on April 17. On April 18, 2 of the four moved to SDF Koyubaru Air Base in Mashikimachi, Kumamoto Prefecture, where they were loaded with relief supplies to be transported to Minami Asomura, a cut-off village on the foot of Mt. Aso. (The distance between the SDF air base and Minami Asomura is about 15 km.)

Meanwhile, the JMSDF Hyuga, a helicopter carrier with a displacement of 13,950 tons, was anchored off Yatsushiro Bay in Kumamoto ready for refueling the relief-operating Ospreys (flying for such short distances?). This clearly shows that the use of Ospreys was politically motivated and meant to demonstrate and confirm mutual cooperation and coordination between USFJ and JSDF.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

As readers here can see, having any dialogue with some posters on this site is useless and a waste of time – they post absolutely inaccurate and completely false information, and when you prove them factually incorrect, they fail to acknowledge their error and just move to some other wild conspiracy theory – and when you prove that wrong, they go back to the first falsehood.

As I said before, any future posts they make on other articles should be viewed as from someone who lacks any credibility and should be ignored.

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U.S. Ospreys win Japanese hearts and minds

They will never win Okinawan hearts and minds

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Correction:

The program of sympathy budged started in 1978, so that "the early 1970's" in my post above should be "the late 1970's".

The initial $32 million has ballooned 49 times today to an amazing $1.56 billion despite the nation's financial difficulty and repeated disasters. No big deal?

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