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U.S. scattered Japan war criminals' ashes at sea to prevent worship

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The US should have also closed the Yasukuni Shrine to prevent the worship of 13 A-class war criminals.

Unfortunately the US understanding of Japanese culture was severely lacking at that time, and now Japan's rightwingers go to Yasukuni to worship Tojo Hideki and Co instead.

-28 ( +27 / -55 )

Hidetoshi Tojo, a great-grandchild of former premier Tojo, said there is no surprise about the U.S. military having scattered war criminals' ashes in the Pacific.

> Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo enshrines more than 2.4 million war dead, regardless of whether there are remains or not, he said. "I feel a difference in religious views in the U.S. way of thinking."

He can say whatever he wants, but, 'religious views' aside, Japan lost. After the war, the country in general got off pretty lucky as their culture and way of life was not drastically altered and the country was rebuilt. Go ask the indigenous peoples across the globe what happened to them after the Europeans came to take over.

10 ( +27 / -17 )

Well that didn't stop them from enshrining them and eventually even their PM from making a point of visiting the said shrine. I guess they should've had them enshrined in some random island in the Pacific or even Antarctica instead to prevent that.

-15 ( +11 / -26 )

The classy attitude of TOJO and Tomoyuki yamashita and others during the trials shows that there was a big class gab between Japan and USA.

-18 ( +5 / -23 )

Samit Basu

The US should have also closed the Yasukuni Shrine to prevent the worship of 13 A-class war criminals.

Even the Japanese government cannot close the private shrine.

12 ( +18 / -6 )

Then how come i read about this year's ago ?

A year ago isn't recently?

1 ( +10 / -9 )

Is not that desecration?

-11 ( +6 / -17 )

They deep-sixed their ashes but, like whack-a-mole, they popped up as objects of "irei" in Yasukuni (LOL). American custom is different, but it would solve a looming problem for the country in the future: the "perfect" way to dispose of 45.

-12 ( +8 / -20 )

The classy attitude of TOJO and Tomoyuki yamashita and others during the trials shows that there was a big class gab between Japan and USA.

That old "ultra national spirit" is not dead after all. Perhaps it will cause the Japanese people the same problems and suffering all over again.

-9 ( +14 / -23 )

Every war has it's criminals, burying the dead is a matter of choice influenced by the severity of their crimes and the impact of keeping the body at a certain location, OBL body was also discarded at sea as far as we know and that also prevented it from becoming a shrine or a place of worship.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

The US should have also closed the Yasukuni Shrine to prevent the worship of 13 A-class war criminals.

Unfortunately the US understanding of Japanese culture was severely lacking at that time, and now Japan's rightwingers go to Yasukuni to worship Tojo Hideki and Co instead.

Japan country..

Japan culture..

Japan religion..

Get used to it..

-12 ( +5 / -17 )

Well, the intentions were probably right for the era, but over time, it's actually turned out to be a meaningless gesture.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@samit

The US should have also closed the Yasukuni Shrine to prevent the worship of 13 A-class war criminals.

Unfortunately the US understanding of Japanese culture was severely lacking at that time, and now Japan's rightwingers go to Yasukuni to worship Tojo Hideki and Co instead.

The enshrinement of the A-class criminals was done nearly 2 decades after their convictions.

Yasukuni Shrine was established in 1869, and the main purpose was to commemorate those who died in wars for Japan. So, a few decades before WW2 started.

The A-class criminals were enshrined at the shrine from 1978 after a decision had been made from 1970.

The Showa emperor was upset over the enshrinement and stopped visiting Yasukuni shrine from 1975. Since then, the Heisei and Reiwa emperors have also never visited Yasukuni shrine.

(Wikipedia)

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Japan country..

Japan culture..

Japan religion..

Get used to it..

Their comment was spot on, and it just seems you dont have the ability to even attempt to understand the situation based upon the thinking back in 1945. Different world back then, and the US really didnt give a crap about Japanese culture, religion, or the country.

Get used to it! Things were different back then.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Reading the headline, I thought this story was about Emperor Hirohito but it was just about his generals and subordinates.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Similarly, Osama's remains were disposed of (for domestic consumption) in the aptly named (and revealing of American intentions) "Operation Neptune", even though worshipping at shrines is positively "haram" in the Sunni version of Islam. The intention this time, though, was that by destroying his body it insulted Muslim custom, no doubt a message the US government wanted to send to Al-Qaida et al.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

the cremated remains would be scattered as their graves could have been deified.

I wonder who built his grave at Zoshigaya then, and why?

https://tokyo-in-pics.com/the-grave-of-hideki-tojo-at-zoshigaya-cemetery/

Tojo was executed at Sugamo Prison (now Ikebukuro Sunshine), which is very close to Zoshigaya, so having the grave there would make sense, but this article says the body was transported to Yokohama before cremation. So, if the point was to avoid having a place where people could gather, and if this grave is completely empty, why have the grave?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Those identified with the disorder of 'nationalism' would be better to be immediately hospitalised as a danger to themselves and others. They have caused far too much trouble historically and produced little of worth, only misery. Japanese have suffered more than many due to this disease. I really hope they have learned the lesson.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

So, if the point was to avoid having a place where people could gather, and if this grave is completely empty, why have the grave?

@isabelle. In Nara prefecture there is a "grave" to the emperor Jimmu, supposedly the original emperor, and it attracts nationalists every year but there is really nothing inside.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Samit BasuToday  07:00 am JST

The US should have also closed the Yasukuni Shrine to prevent the worship of 13 A-class war criminals.

They are enshrined together with 2,466,532 souls starting from 1867. Of which 21,181 are Koreans.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

MoonrakerToday  08:37 am JST

The classy attitude of TOJO and Tomoyuki yamashita and others during the trials shows that there was a big class gab between Japan and USA.

That old "ultra national spirit" is not dead after all. 

Yes but it lives today in the CCP dictatorship. The only ones that harp on the J-right wing are CCP supporters. And we all know who is behind the J-right wing.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

They are enshrined together with 2,466,532 souls starting from 1867. Of which 21,181 are Koreans.

Don't bring up Koreans whenever it suits your agenda. Most Koreans want that shrine gone and for their ancestors' remains to be returned to their homeland.

-13 ( +5 / -18 )

Sarah H. J. LeeToday  11:09 am JST

*They are enshrined together with 2,466,532 souls starting from 1867. Of which *21,181 are Koreans.

Don't bring up Koreans whenever it suits your agenda. Most Koreans want that shrine gone and for their ancestors' remains to be returned to their homeland.

Oh I see, I must not mention actual facts if it interferes with your agenda. And what qualification do you have to speak on behalf of the majority of South Korean nationals?

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Sarah H. J. Lee

 

Don't bring up Koreans whenever it suits your agenda. Most Koreans want that shrine gone and for their ancestors' remains to be returned to their homeland.

There are no remains of a single person at the Yasukuni Shrine. There are just names on paper mostly turned to dust and names in a register.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

And we all know who is behind the J-right wing.

Do we? You'd better enlighten us. And perhaps remind us what qualification you have to speak on behalf of them?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

On the other hand occupying forces gave immunity to the psychotic doctors who worked at Unit 731. Many of whom went on to lucrative careers in their respective fields.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Oh I see, I must not mention actual facts if it interferes with your agenda. And what qualification do you have to speak on behalf of the majority of South Korean nationals?

Well, being Korean for one might allow me to speak on behalf of many of my friends and acquaintances who are of the same mind (and before you accuse me of being a Japan hater, which seems to be your go-to response whenever someone disagrees with you, I voted for Yoon). And what's your qualification, since you're frequently here speaking on behalf of Japan's right-wingers?

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Why do people believe there are any remains at the Yasukuni Shrine?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

NayelToday 07:59 am JST

The classy attitude of TOJO and Tomoyuki yamashita and others during the trials shows that there was a big class gab between Japan and USA.

I guess waging aggressive and illegal war can all be made up for by acting classy.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

OssanAmericaToday  10:23 am JST

*They are enshrined together with 2,466,532 souls starting from 1867. Of which 21,181 are Koreans*.

So a whopping 0.008% at Yasukuni were dumb, misguided Koreans. And?

Approximately 1.0mil Europeans and 1.0mil Russians enlisted in the Nazi military. It happens in every war.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

How about the civilians murdered in Nagasaki, Hiroshima and Okinawa? Where is their ashes?

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

@MilesTeg

So a whopping 0.008% at Yasukuni were dumb, misguided Koreans. And?

Actually they were illegally conscripted soldiers and forced laborers.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Samit BasuToday  02:25 pm JST

@MilesTeg

So a whopping 0.008% at Yasukuni were dumb, misguided Koreans. And?

Actually they were illegally conscripted soldiers and forced laborers.

I think you're right.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Why do people believe there are any remains at the Yasukuni Shrine?

No, the remains are kept elsewhere, along with their ancestral tablets. Their names, however, are enshrined at Yasukuni.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Sarah H. J. Lee

   Why do people believe there are any remains at the Yasukuni Shrine?

> No, the remains are kept elsewhere, along with their ancestral tablets. Their names, however, are enshrined at Yasukuni.

There are no bones, remains, or ashes at Yasukuni Shrine. The remains of the dead will most likely be in their family graves.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I thought the scattering of their ashes in the sea was common knowledge.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It wasn't until long after the war that Yasukuni Shrine became a target for political reasons.

Even Chinese President Deng Xiaoping has visited Yasukuni Shrine.

In the first place, the purpose is not to go to worship, but to go to the repose of the souls of the war dead.

Would an American obey a Vietnamese or an Iraqi telling him not to go to Arlington Cemetery?

It is an impossible story, and it is nothing more than interference in the internal affairs of China and South Korea.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Tell me why people do so much care about Japanese enshrining yasukuni. It doesn't change anything. The extreme right-wing guys who showed up at yasukuni for their own satisfaction are a negligibly small part of the Japanese. Japan cannot strongly go against China Korea Russia let alone the US anymore. Japan cannot be militarized again, which the modern Japanese are not interested in at all unlike the US or China. You know how SDF struggles to recruit people. Why don't you let them go there to just comfort themselves.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

They deep-sixed their ashes but, like whack-a-mole, they popped up as objects of "irei" in Yasukuni (LOL).

For all I've criticized Japan regarding their Covid-era / post-Covid normalized xenophobia and mistreatment of Chinese and Vietnamese immigrants especially, I do not have a problem with the Yasukuni Shrine.

The Yasukuni Shrine was not built after WW2. Additionally, nobody is even buried there. The Shinto priests simply did not want to pander to foreign influences. Hypothetically speaking, even if the government wanted to shut it down, they can't, as it is not a state monument but a religious one, which would unironically controvert the very idea of religious liberty that America forced on Japan to begin with.

Of all the hills to die on, this one is pretty silly. The anti-Yasukuni is a narrative loitered with falsehoods and misinformation, that anti-Japanese groups in Asia and Leftist groups in the West have seized and ran with it. It is nothing more than a propaganda complex spouted by Koreans, Chinese, and even some Americans. I'm more concerned about the bad things and injustices happening in Japan today, not issues of the past.

It's over, this is a dead issue now. The Yasukuni Shrine is never going to be closed. The Japanese have a right to honor their war dead - get over it.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

American custom is different, but it would solve a looming problem for the country in the future: the "perfect" way to dispose of 45.

Also, you sound incredibly unhinged / mentally ill.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Sarah H. J. LeeAug. 15  01:01 pm JST

*Oh I see, I must not mention actual facts if it interferes with your agenda. And what qualification do you have to speak on behalf of the majority of South Korean nationals?*

Well, being Korean for one might allow me to speak on behalf of many of my friends and acquaintances who are of the same mind (and before you accuse me of being a Japan hater, which seems to be your go-to response whenever someone disagrees with you, I voted for Yoon). And what's your qualification, since you're frequently here speaking on behalf of Japan's right-wingers?

Being American does not qualify me to speak for all Americans. Therefore I do not. You being Korean does not qualify you to speak for all Koreans. As much as you may imagine you are.

I have not accused you of anything, however your own belligerent comment establishes what kind of "hater" you may be, for all to see.

I have never spoken on behalf of Right Wingers in Japan, US, or any other country. I am not qualified to speak on their behalf. All democracies have Right and Left "wingers" to varying degrees. If I were South Korean, I would be far more concerned with the rampant Right Wing nationalism in South Korea that has ingrained it's youth with revisionist history and continues to direct SK politics against it's own benefit. President Yoon is a true South Korean patriot.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

MilesTegAug. 15  01:38 pm JST

OssanAmericaToday  10:23 am JST

They are enshrined together with 2,466,532 souls starting from 1867. Of which 21,181 are Koreans****.

So a whopping 0.008% at Yasukuni were dumb, misguided Koreans. And?

Another often repeated Korean revisionist fallacy. There is nothing to substantiate the claim that Koreans in the Imperial Japanese military were either "dumb" or "misguided". The vast majority of Koreans enlisted willingly either out of personal belief and/or economic benefit. Forced Conscription on the Korean Peninsula did not even start until 1944 when the tide of the war turned against Japan. Koreans rose in officer ranks and one even became a Lt General who was charged as a Class-A War Criminal and executed by the Allies. South Korean historical revisionism hides the hypocrisy of Koreans bashing Yasukuni.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Every war has its war criminals, even today. And many are thriving and making millions from tours and talks. Very few ever get to face the consequences of their actions, but if they do, they are always on the losing side. I am in two minds about what the USA did with Hideki Tojo's ashes, but they did the same thing with Bin Laden.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hitler was responsible for the devastation and atrocity of the Second World War fought in the European theater.

Hitler was Furor of Nazi Germany to the last day whereas Hideki Tojo was Prime Minister of Japan only briefly and is said to have been personally opposed to challenging the U.S. by fighting it. Can Hitler and Tojo be treated as part of the same gang then?

Some pundit says his execution as a Class A war criminal was only retaliatory at the best.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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