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Japan-bound United Airlines plane makes safe emergency landing in LA after losing tire during takeoff

14 Comments

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it was a United maintenance team that changed the tire

That's the important point. The maintenance guys may not be responsible either, though how a number of bolts holding the tire on the plane would all sheer off concurrently is something I can't imagine. If any were missing, the pilot should have noticed on his pre-flight inspection before taxiing.

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Price said a loose tire is normally a maintenance issue and not a problem created by the manufacturer.

This is quite troubling too. Makes you wonder how many other things aren't being checked regularly.

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Made in Germany - high quality

Made in Japan - reliable

Made in the USA - flip a coin to see if it works or not

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Oops!

. . . UA maintenance worker

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The tire landed in an employee parking lot at San Francisco International Airport, where it smashed into a car and shattered its back window 

Just the window huh? Have a look at the car it hit. I'm sure a window will be all it needs

https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/350206129/watch-tyre-comes-united-airlines-flight-during-takeoff-san-francisco

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Not exactly a ringing endorsement of the American aviation industry's very vocally stated commitment to DEI.

Just hire the best pilots, crew, and mechanics. Safety is obviously more important than pushing social agendas.

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Just hire the best pilots, crew, and mechanics. Safety is obviously more important than pushing social agendas.

Or focusing exclusively on ensuring stock price is kept high over safety, as Boeing has been called out for recently.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Not just a tire/tyre. Looks more like a wheel, from that photo.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I used to book based on price and schedule.

These days when I book a flight I check if it’s scheduled as a Boeing or an Airbus.

you can probably guess how I make my choice.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

That's the important point. The maintenance guys may not be responsible either, though how a number of bolts holding the tire on the plane would all sheer off concurrently is something I can't imagine. If any were missing, the pilot should have noticed on his pre-flight inspection before taxiing.

Aircraft wheels are not held on the same way as a car or truck. There is just one big nut on the end of the axle holding the wheel on the axle. Bolts around the perimeter hold the stack up of brake discs on the wheel (wheels with brakes will have multiple brake discs with friction materials between the discs and on each outside surface). On the smaller aircraft I flew there was a big cotter key on the end of the axle that fitted through a hole in the axle and into slots in what we called a "castleated nut" preventing the nut from turning but the landing gear on heavy transport aircraft that I have seen do not have this.

It could be the nut was not torqued to spec, something that is not visible on a pre-flight inspection or the bearing inside the wheel failed allowing the wheel to separate from the axle.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Just hire the best pilots, crew, and mechanics. Safety is obviously more important than pushing social agendas.

Cutting corners to save a buck has nothing to do with pushing social agendas /: Find out just how much work is required to earn an A&P license that qualifies you to work on aircraft and to be able to sign off the work was done according to the manufacturers recommendations. Somebody might just loose their A&P license over this.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Cutting corners to save a buck has nothing to do with pushing social agendas /: Find out just how much work is required to earn an A&P license that qualifies you to work on aircraft and to be able to sign off the work was done according to the manufacturers recommendations. Somebody might just loose their A&P license over this.

The A&P license holders are employees of the manufacturer. They're self-policing. And when they decide stock prices need to be high, self-policing becomes ineffectual.

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The A&P license holders are employees of the manufacturer.

No. You find A&Ps at every airport at just about every level of aviation. Every airline has their own army of A&Ps to maintain their aircraft as do the any maintenance shops at airports around the US.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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