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Unreleased diary of pioneering Japanese feminist to be displayed

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Hardly anything about this "pioneer feminist" in her bio during the war years, when she was in her 40s and 50s. If Japan ever needed a progressive activist to speak out, it was in this period. But nope. Just a snippet about how she promoted eugenics for the sake of the "Japanese race." Nice.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Im not an English teacher thank God, but shouldn't this be written:

"Newly released diary of pioneering Japanese feminist to be displayed"

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Just a snippet about how she promoted eugenics for the sake of the "Japanese race." Nice.

Can we at least agree that she was an -ist?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Several photocopied pages of the diary of Raicho Hiratsuka ... will be exhibited

Wow, they are going to display some photocopies! Exciting stuff!

/s

4 ( +6 / -2 )

There were many powerful and 'rebellious' women in the early twentieth century, in Japan.

Besides, Hiratsuka, Fumiko Kanako, comes to mind. Kanako's one book, written prior to her suicide at age 23, in 1926: Prison Memoirs of a Japanese Woman, is an important book, illustrating a very intelligent critique of Japanese Society. In particular the family and the role of women. It also broaches the politics of the time. It is not a flattering portrait of Japan. Such is also evident in the text, Reflections on the Way to the Gallows: Rebel Women in Prewar Japan, by Hane, who translated, Prison Memoirs. Hiratsuka, appears in that particular text.

Most are forgot. And brushed over with the shiny glow that focuses on the aristocracy and the monumental architectures that now attract 'tourism' and that mask the ordinary lives within the culture during the period of the early & mid 20th century. None more evident than in the life of Hiratsuka. Now, that she is no longer a danger, she can be resurrected and minimally honored.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

My MIL was the first woman in her small, mountainous town, Yabe, Kumamoto, to have a drivers license. She required it to drive the torturous mountain roads down to the sea to retrieve fish. Sadly, I never met her - but she lives on through my wife, who is not someone you want to screw with. (I've learned this.)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Richard Gallagher - thank you. You've given me many things that I will have to study.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Under consideration of global situations and developments, I would like to say that we don’t need more feminists but just more normal women (and men) again.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Interesting, apart from alleged eugenics, natch. As with the Titanic thread, it's fascinating and much appreciated to find out more about forgotten pieces and people of history.

I would like to say that we don’t need more feminists but just more normal women (and men) again.

Please - not this atagonistic stuff, again.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Richard Gallagher, thanks.

Another woman of note is Yosana Akiko.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yosano_Akiko

There is a museum in Sakai that is shared between displays of the lives of Sen No Rikyu and Yosana Akiko.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hardly anything about this "pioneer feminist" in her bio during the war years, when she was in her 40s and 50s. If Japan ever needed a progressive activist to speak out, it was in this period. But nope. Just a snippet about how she promoted eugenics for the sake of the "Japanese race." Nice.

Im pretty sure she didn’t ‘speak out’, because if she did, she’d have gotten a visit from the Tokko before the words had even left her lips.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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