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Fukushima wind turbine, symbol of disaster recovery, to be removed

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Would like no know who manufacted it. There are successful turbines used throughout Europe, America, South Pacific. Seems strange this one has so many problems. If it due to an excessive diameter, couldn't that be reduced lessening the burden on other parts. How on earth can you take something that's a successful idea globally and end up having to dismantle it. What a waist of money.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

How on earth can you take something that's a successful idea globally and end up having to dismantle it. What a waist of money.

Public funding, and a window dressing by the government to pay lip service to the idea of renewable energy.

Just one more reason for the government to push for starting up the reactors again!

13 ( +13 / -0 )

Incredible that a nation as advanced as Japan cannot successfully operate a windfarm. In the North West of England the power company there has just announced all of its power will be wind generated. What works in the UK can surely work in Japan?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

It's quite well documented that wind turbines do require a lot of maintenance although, most are maintained successfully and kept in operation. As Yubaru stated, it's all about nuclear power. The government has nuclear signs in their eyes and will do anything to return to 30% nuclear power. And, it has nothing to do with the efficiency of nuclear energy. It's all about the money they have invested in it and they are not gonna let it go. Since the meltdowns in Fukushima Japan has had the chance to become a world leader in alternative energies and set an example for the rest of the world. However, they have opted to keep all their ageing reactors and have become the laughing stock of the world. This has also drawn a lot of anger from environmental groups and anguish from the Japanese people, 60% of which do not want Japan to continue its reliance on nuclear energy. Many countries successfully use wind energy as a mainstay for electricity supply. Why is it that Japan cannot cope with the maintenance? Hmmm?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

FYI

This was an experimental WTG and was used as a test bed.

Mitsubishi Corporation is responsible for providing coordination for grid integration and environmental impact assessment. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries is the manufacturer of the 7MW oil pressure drive-type floating wind turbines.

Hitachi manufactured the 2MW offshore wind turbine, the 66kV floating offshore substation and its monitoring system. Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding is the manufacturer of the floater for the 2MW wind turbine.

https://www.power-technology.com/projects/fukushima-floating-offshore-wind-farm/

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Clearly nuclear will be what keeps Japan powered well into the future. Their existing plants will give Japan what it needs to run and lessons learned will make sure that this sort of disaster does not happen again. Japan is not blessed with vast desserts to install solar or wind farms like China does, and with the high availability of nuclear, there is no need for all the complexities of intermittent solar and wind. France also has the right idea, and both Japan and France will be able to adapt to renewables after other countries have done the Lions share of the work to get renewables mainstream and more cost comparative. This is a much cheaper and less risky approach compared to other more fanatic countries. After all, they are not adding the dreaded CO2 to the atmosphere with this approach.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Incredible that a nation as advanced as Japan cannot successfully operate a windfarm.

This. When I visited Germany, I could see many wind turbines as far as eye can see along the Autobahn. Sure there is some too in Japan, but they seem inadequate.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Thankyou @pwrpeople, seriously thankyou.

(What follows is definatly not an attack) so it was experimental and had Hitachi, Mitsubishi involvment no doubt with government financial support to build, as the article says one of the largest diameter wind thingies in the world. And being plagued with problems now has to be dissembled, no doubt by the same companies, that's double dipping. Instead of reinventing the wheel, and this is just a thought!, get a company from another country to show you how to build these things? Never happen as the agender was not about providing a sustainable source of power to begin with. It's lamentable how corrupt business practices are in Japan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This. When I visited Germany, I could see many wind turbines as far as eye can see along the Autobahn. Sure there is some too in Japan, but they seem inadequate.

If you don't go to the Japan Sea coast then you won't see many of them. Akita prefecture has tons of them, and Ive seen them all the way down to Niigata. The winds in Japan are generally West to East, so there isn't much reason to build them on the Pacific coast line.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

There are smaller wind turbines all over Japan. They work fine,. The one in question was experimental.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Nuclear disaster, cancer etc, decommissioning and 1000 years storage compared to changing to a blade.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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