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Gay Taiwanese man granted special permission to remain in Japan

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Quite a remarkable (and good) ruling. I imagine, since his case was reviewed, these 2 men are working, paying taxes, and are positive contributors to society.

Little by little Japan is changing. Although the pace is slow relative to what westerners are used to this is happening. It will be interesting to see what Japan is like 20 years from now.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

...been together since 2011 ... To live with her Japanese partner, Kristina Baumann, 32, has had to continuously enroll in schools to obtain student visas...

One would imagine that after 7 or so years of attending school, Ms Baumann would be sufficiently proficient in Japanese to get a job, obtain a work visa, and properly "live" in the country.

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

People who wouldn’t procreate to keep society are considered while those who give births to make society alive are disrespected and kicked out. So this is justice?

-15 ( +3 / -18 )

People who wouldn’t procreate to keep society are considered while those who give births to make society alive are disrespected and kicked out. So this is justice?

The ability to become pregnant is not a factor in determining what is just.

12 ( +14 / -2 )

@Chiekf akwame -

Yes, precisely, this is justice. I believe society has developed beyond forcing people to repeatedly become pregnant and have children in order to survive, because that is called rape and slavery.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

People who wouldn’t procreate to keep society are considered while those who give births to make society alive are disrespected and kicked out. So this is justice?

I think I know your thinking but you have worded it poorly.

I agree with you that society is unfair when:

It forces a pregnant intern to abort or be deported; whilst

Granting residency to a man who can't contribute to Japan's FUTURE prosperity (and particulary with regards to Japan's demographic problem).

The pregnancy is a short term issue for the country employing her, but a positive contribution to FUTURE Japanese society. Yet the country's laws work against her.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

correction should be 'company employing her'

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Heartwarming news. Japan is not and traditionally has never been a nation where LGBT people are discriminated against, unlike Western nations. And this ruling shows this. Congratulations to this LGBT Taiwanese man.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I must say I was shocked that the Justice Ministry made this ruling!! And very pleasantly so!!

This is truly groundbreaking for Japan and I hope that it will be the first of many more similar rulings that liberalize the visa system.

Truthfully, the logic here is not just for non-heterosexual couples. So many long-term heterosexual couples also choose to spend their lives together without getting married and this includes foreigners that move to Japan for business. In such cases, the partner is not eligible for a spouse visa.

In any event, congratulations to this couple!!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

FABulous news!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

@Maria

I believe society has developed beyond forcing people to repeatedly become pregnant and have children in order to survive, because that is called rape and slavery.

Maria, please explain how society forces people to repeatedly become pregnant and have children.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Why didn't they move to Taiwan?

Gay marriage is legal in Taiwan.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Not exactly a feel good story to me.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

The last visa for the Taiwanese man mentioned in the article is the three-month visa in October 1993. Had he been without a visa ever since then? No work visa ever? Never worked outside the home? I’m not saying work visas are the solution for such couples, just curious as to how he managed to stay under the radar so long.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I don't see how is that a good reason, overstaying of Visa should have been illegal.

Japan should be very careful given that such precedence can be easily abused given that no marriage or children was part of the equation.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Personally, I disagree with the decision.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

hold on how about straight gaijin visa overstayers, if they can show that theyve been in a relationship for a long period of time and know Japanese well, can they apply to stay also, even though they willing broke the law in the first palce!? Or is this free pass only available to gay couples!?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

 I’m not saying work visas are the solution for such couples, just curious as to how he managed to stay under the radar so long. youd be surprised visa overstayers normally keep a very low profile, ive known a couple who were working at a company illegally , their J boss knew they were overstayers, for the first couple of years they basically hardly left the company they were working. accomodation was provided by the company on site. only left to get food etc. they had a raid by police but there were plenty of hiding places the police would never look. It was a win win , the J boss could pay them at the minimum wage, free accomodation and free lunches, the overstayers were grateful they had a job and could save a lot since they had hardly any living costs. even though the wage was low it was high compared to their home countries, sending money back to support their families

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Good decision made here. Japan is making progress.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I'm glad that this decision was made, but it's just kicking the can down the road. What this tells people is that gay people in relationships should just overstay their visas illegally, when instead Japan should make a legal framework for them.

@wtfjapan

The difference is that Japan HAS a course for straight people in relationships that want to stay in the country due to their relationship. It's called "marriage". With no gay marriage, that option exists ONLY for straight people.

@samit basu

1) Gay marriage is not legal per se in Taiwan. The constitutional court ruled that this situation is unconstitutional and it has to change by May 24th this year, but that's still in the future.

2) That Taiwan decision was in 2017, a year after this person was ordered to be deported.

3) Even if it were legal there, there are a host of other reasons that someone may not want to move to another country. No one country is perfect and solves every problem.

4) It's still unjust that it's not legal here and some people believe in fighting for what they think is right. This person has brought a lot of attention to this issue with this legal battle.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

AlexBecu,

I dont know how this decision is Japan "making progress". He knew it was illegal and since 1993.

Divinda,

I was thinking the same thing, I wonder why she can't find work?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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