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High court rules 84 Hiroshima A-bomb 'black rain' victims eligible for aid

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Too little, too late for the deceased. - Condolences to their surviving families.

”the high court recognized all 84 plaintiffs, including deceased individuals, as hibakusha”

Rest In Peace.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

The government here is so annoying that I'm going to stop reading JT for a month or two to protect my mental health.

This is insanely sad.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

Agreed: “This is insanely sad.” - When does your boycott start @AlanBogglesworth 7:13am?:

“The govt here is so annoying that I'm going to stop reading JT for a mo or two…”.

perhaps Friday, July 23, 2021? - (2020 Summer Olympics opening ceremony day)

An interesting ‘silent protest’ idea to support these victims (hibakusha), while opposing the larger govt’s expenditures on “Games”?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

It only took 76 years. Japanese law at it's best, yet again.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Pathetic and insulting to those that have already died..Once again the J government is living up to its reputation of being inept heartless and mean.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

It seems to me J government always try not to compensate to victims suffering from it had done wrong policies a long time ago.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Third world judiciary.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

76 years? It took 76 YEARS? Oh yeah, I forgot. It was THEIR FAULT for being there...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The defendants had argued there was no scientific proof for nuclear fallout in the area where the plaintiffs resided. Even if they were exposed to radiation, its influence on their health would be insignificant, the defendants said.

I remember the late 80s in Europe, just before I came to Japan. After the Chernobyl explosion, the media even in Western countries picked up the news from ITAR-TASS and so we also often heard that there was no scientific proof of nuclear fallout, followed after a while by reports like "and even if we were exposed to radiation, the health effects would be negligible". The situation gradually changed as measuring stations across Europe refined their records.

So to say the same thing today, in the 21st century, is really absurd.

It's as if all 84 people made it up, as if they all happen to have the same symptoms, diseases, etc. So the court heard exactly the same thing as, for example, in the case of Kumamoto Prefecture, Minamata City poisoning.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Glad some justice was done.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

However late (seven and a half decades) justice and scientific truth prevailed. It does not, however, wipe out the injustice that these victims had long suffered.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The high court said radioactive rain fell in a wider area beyond the designated zone and the plaintiffs are hibakusha because they are likely to have suffered health damage caused by their exposure to radiation.

What health damage? Remaining victims are going to be at least 76 years of age have therefore gone on to lead normal life spans - hardly being cut down in your prime, is it?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

76 years? It took 76 YEARS? Oh yeah, I forgot. It was THEIR FAULT for being there...

I thought that the faulr were from were the coward war criminals who dropped those two atomic bombs, evaporating two cities full of innocent people.

The government here is so annoying that I'm going to stop reading JT for a month or two to protect my mental health.

This is insanely sad.

Third world judiciary.

It's ok to be sad...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

*fault

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Long-term effects of the rain exposure shortly after the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25402555/

1 ( +1 / -0 )

My wife's grandmother (RIP) experienced the black rain, and she lived pretty far away when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Her reaction was, "What is this?!" I wonder how many Japanese had similar experiences.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And this took almost a 100 years to decide?

Well,speed isn't their main virtue.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Who are the defendants?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

what a "speed" so bad they have spent decades to look for fax paper as it seems that they did not find any....

very strange and weird same time.

no money can help...just wondering why Japan did not ask USA to get money for these people a LONG TIME AGO!!!???!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Will they fix a new border? Or is this only for these 84 plaintiffs?

What about the black rain that fell in the adjoining prefecture? I have spoken with people who witnessed it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Is this surprising? The very corrupt empirical government that causes these bombings in the first place refuses to acknowledge them.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Incredible speed and a decision in a timely manner after most of the victims have….died out!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I thought that the faulr were from were the coward war criminals who dropped those two atomic bombs, evaporating two cities full of innocent people.

Why was America at war with Japan?

Why didn’t Japan surrender before the first atomic bomb was dropped?

Why didn’t Japan surrender after the first bomb?

Why didn’t Japan surrender immediately after the second bomb was dropped instead of 6 days later?

Do you recognize the war crimes by Japan?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Black rain fell on those Pacific atolls as well. A bit of hosing down, leaf blowers, and all was well.

False information. They are off-limits.

High rates of birth defects and cancer have been reported in the Marshallese in the decades following 67 documented nuclear device tests, which took place from 1946 to 1958 in the Marshall Islands. The most powerful nuclear test, nicknamed “Bravo,” went off in Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The high court ruling is expected to impact the ongoing review by the central government on areas where black rain fell and its health impact.

The central government needs a court ruling to review this further? How about looking at itself as the cause in the first place for putting its people in the path of an inevitable act of self-defense and self-restraint and an attempt to end the war in a way that would incur the fewest casualties possible, by a country that was just trying to stay at peace?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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