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IOC chief to confirm Japan's food products safe for Olympic participants

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Thanks zichi - good to know that it isn't that widespread.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Thanks Zichi - no one suggested Japan is#1 agro-chemical user.

But if you research thoroughly you will find that the use per hectare is right up there - right up there..

The conditions as I mentioned in Japan are not conducive to large scale production of many food stuffs without using large amounts of chemicals. Just the way it is. Rice as a wet land, hot weather product will naturally fair much better than say Peaches or tomatoes.

Anyways - enjoy your rustic paradise. I'm almost there, but not quite.

Cheers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"....I would state Japanese farmers dont use chemicals anymore than in many other countries and probably less than in America...."

As in my last comment I checked on line that Japan uses less than France and Italy and some chemicals less than America.

So I am correct Japanese farmers who use chemicals are not the number one country in the world with others ahead of it.

I'm with you Zichi in having a desire for as natural as possible food. Unfortunately that is difficult to achieve while living in cities, both from accessibility and cost perspective.

You can find land even in cities. I have grown large quantities of vegetables in my London garden. Also had six hens and one sheep. I also grew vegetables for 16 years in our previous location in Kobe.

Even a little patio or balcony.

When I was in New York many decades ago I planted potatoes on the spare lands alongside the churches and told the homeless people to pick them when grown so they would have something to eat.

Active member of Friends of the Earth and help to produce some of the first ecology type mags using offset printing.

In future, I think both skyscraper farms and deep cave growing. There is already one cave in Japan being used to grow rice. City farming at its best.

It's strange that the media hasn't done any follow up stories over the years (to my knowledge) on the procurement of organic foodstuffs for the Olympics.

It's not a priority for them just reassuring people over the possible radiation contaminations.

End of last year we moved to farm/beach area of Tatsuno, after Himeji. Great place to live and work.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Zichi - thank you for your reply. I'm sure farming practices in your area are relatively safe and traditional customs in place. It must be a nice part of Japan to live.

However I made my original comment in relation to your comment -

"....I would state Japanese farmers dont use chemicals anymore than in many other countries and probably less than in America...."

This actually is not the case. That's all.

My interest in the article was more along these lines as they are discussing "safe" supposedly in regards to radioactive substances, while dis-regarding any other mention of what safe food is.

It's strange that the media hasn't done any follow up stories over the years (to my knowledge) on the procurement of organic foodstuffs for the Olympics.

I'm with you Zichi in having a desire for as natural as possible food. Unfortunately that is difficult to achieve while living in cities, both from accessability and cost perspective.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

herbicide / pesticide use per hectare of arable land, is higher in France and Italy than in Japan. Both France and Italy are major agricultural countries. It so happens I have lived in both, and both times on farms.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

browny1

Zichi - if you look at herbicide / pesticide use per hectare of arable land, then you'll find that Japan is indeed one of the largest users in the world. In fact the situation is compounded because of Japan's compact size.

This info can be easily sourced.

I have only commented on what happens in the farming community we live in and what I actually see with my own eyes. I made no comment about the nation as a whole.

You comment is unwarranted based on what I said in my comments.

They also grow cabbages here too I was admiring a field of them yesterday, Size of large footballs. I can see from my windows already a very large field of rice was cut. I have been able to watch that field and others since January and see what happened with them.

I have lived and worked on farms for many years of my life. I have grown my own own crops. I'm a big supporter of organic farming and companion growing. I have a big interest in how food is produced and also cooking and baking.

I don't dismiss your comment just like I didn't with the comment by Omachi but the contents of my own comments are also true and correct.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Zichi - if you look at herbicide / pesticide use per hectare of arable land, then you'll find that Japan is indeed one of the largest users in the world. In fact the situation is compounded because of Japan's compact size.

This info can be easily sourced.

Unfortunately, Japan with it's hot, humid, wet, spring to summer seasons - the principal food growing time - has enormous problems battling invasive grasses, weeds, insects, fungi & moulds and other diseases

Individual farmers and zones may well use less chemicals, but on the whole many don't - or cannot.

For example, my farmer friend refuses to grow cabbages because they require weekly spraying over a 4+month period. She only grows vegetables that she can do so with minimal chemicals - not free of, but minimal.

As it seems that higher temperatures and heavier rainfall will increase over the ensuing decades, full time commercial farming will become more difficult. The future for much agricultural production is large scale sealed climate controlled "ventures" where produce can be carefully monitored for premium growth without the use of chemicals. Such hi-tech operations will be truly self sufficient, recycling materials and supplying their own energy through bio-gases, solar and wind.

Such places already exist.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Omachi

I know because where I live from my bedroom windows I can see nothing but fields for a very great distance. The silence is golden and you can hear all the various creatures. There's almost no mechanical sounds even during the day.

The farmers around here working their fields from about 4am-5pm. If they were using radio controlled helicopters I would definitely hear them.

In the spring and summer there are many golden sunrises with the light coming into our bedroom. I usually get up to watch it. Occasionally, there will be a farmer already in his fields.

Since moving here I was surprised I haven't seen any farmer using any sprays or chemicals and was surprised to find thousands of pink slugs in the rice fields which the farmers do nothing about. Pomacea canaliculata and Pomacea insularium.

I think because there are high numbers of herons, egrets and various ducks, all of which eat the slugs. We are very close to a very large river, the Ibogawa.

There are healthy numbers of various insects including butterflies, wild bees and others.

Even sitting at my computer there are two windows looking across the rice fields.

I didn't dismiss your claim but I stated that I hadn't seen that where we live nor in Nagano where we lived for 10 years.

I'm currently surrounded by farming families. It's our community.

So at least for my area, I know.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

zichi

How would you know? I take early morning walks such that I am back home well before sunrise, and this spraying is finished by sunrise. I don't have experience with other crops - apples, pears, etc., but given the 'perfect fruit' affinity here, I suspect that pesticides are widely used.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Omachi

that does not happen where we live.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I live in a rice growing region - and I keep honey bees. Every year I lose hives to pesticide poisoning, determined by the worker bees discarding their dead larvae outside the hive.   Here they use radio controlled helicopters in the early morning hours to spray the rice fields and they do this also in the weeks before harvest. I seriously doubt that this is just a local practice and is limited to rice. IMO - overuse of pesticides, and when they are used in relation to harvest timing is a food safety problem. Everything that can be pealed should be, and everything else should be washed thoroughly.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

My mother-in-law buys most of her veg from the local farmers coop.

They are pretty much everywhere in kansai.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

End of last year we moved to a new countryside beach area. The rice fields are bigger than what I have seen before. Everyone shared the rice planting helping each other out. That's how its done here. No chemicals were used before the planting, or since. There were pink slugs which surprised me showing that to be true.

The rice crops in the fields have now turned yellow. The farmers are now planting crops of carrots and daikon.

There have been many fruits, including figs, oranges, peaches, apples. There are farmer markets for buying along with the stores stocking local produce.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I doubt they will have any issues with the food; that’ll be the positive. But, after reading an article about the rugby venues today, I would be more worried about the safety of all of the venues.

Oh and the weather. I guess it’s going to be okay because, by memory, didn’t they test the triathlon by shortening the test. At least one athlete had heatstroke (suspected).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

My concern is the ocean water being used to cool the reactors and then that water being flushed back into the ocean. I know the reactor accident was 8 years ago but when TEPCO was spinning truths back then, I am still in wonderment of where Fukushima is today and the process of cleaning up and containing the plant.

As far as "safe" food in Japan. I'm there every year and aside from the occasional MSG headache from ramen, I eat mostly vegetables, gyoza, and fish when I'm there... I feel fine and have no signs of illness.

Side note: I climbed Fujisan last July for the 1st time and it treacherous to say the least. The entire climb up and down was 15 hours. Bring your own food and oxygen if you attempt to climb. We fortunately got to our station hut 25 minutes late and dinner service (curry rice) was not available to us. Turns out, over a dozen people got violently ill and could not climb or needed assistance getting down the mountain. Bring your own food! 2 liters of water per person. Good Luck!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

You have evidence for that. Fukushima is a very large prefecture, the 3rd largest in the country. 98% of the land wasn't contaminated from radiation. Foods from Fukushima are being tested unlike other prefectures, and in fact unlike other countries

Go to any supermarket near you and try to find Fukushima product. Chance are you couldn't find any, at least not by just reading plain information that written on packages.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Most dangerous food next year? Mochi.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

also hate to think how much chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers are used on Japanese farms.

Having lived in the countryside for ten years and did organic farming for our vegetables. I also did farming several times in the UK, I would state Japanese farmers dont use chemicals anymore than in many other countries and probably less than in America.

You must have a very difficult time eating here, how does that work out for you. Today, when we went to the local strore we bought a very nice brown rice which we enjoyed in our dinner.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

I also hate to think how much chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers are used on Japanese farms.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Just add more radiation safety information on the packaging. And install Geiger counters for consumers in stores and catering.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

All the downvotes. You can tell the anti-Japan crowd is bothered by facts. Bothered that Japanese food and products are safe and of high quality. Can't bash Japan the way they like.

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

Wallace Fred

There's no such thing as safe food if it's grown anywhere near nuclear fallout. If you can't it food from chenobyl, you most definitely can't eat that from Fukushima. Well, if that's what floats your boat, go right ahead.

You have evidence for that. Fukushima is a very large prefecture, the 3rd largest in the country. 98% of the land wasn't contaminated from radiation. Foods from Fukushima are being tested unlike other prefectures, and in fact unlike other countries.

People are living near Chernobyl and growing their foods.

Most food from all countries now contains some levels of radiation contaminations and we should all be concerned about that.

The levels allowed in Japan are one tenth of the International levels used by America and the EU countries.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

There's no such thing as safe food if it's grown anywhere near nuclear fallout. If you can't it food from chenobyl, you most definitely can't eat that from Fukushima. Well, if that's what floats your boat, go right ahead.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Food in Japan is safe and healthy. I'm sure Japan will get glowing reviews

Nice pun.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Food in Japan is relatively safe. I am worried about recent reports about flushing irradiated water into the sea, though.

That can't be good.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Food in Japan is safe and healthy. I'm sure Japan will get glowing reviews. This is a formality that will, hopefully, head off protests from political activists and of course, Korea.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach intends to assure participants of the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics that Japanese food products are safe following the Fukushima

Japan has plenty great food sources beside Fukushima but since 2011 Japan Inc always try to push consumption food from that area both domestic and globally. Of course Tokyo 2020 just another way to brand safety of the food from that region.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

How is the IOC an arbiter of food safety? It sounds more like another opportunity to grift money from a host country.

16 ( +17 / -1 )

If you worry, don't buy or eat out, or bring in all the foods like the Korean national teams was rumored to be doing.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Isn't Japan the country with the most Michelin stars or something like that for food quality? More than places like France and UK. That by itself says something about the very, very high quality of foods in the land of the rising sun.

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

In my opinion it seems ridiculous at all that it is necessary to additionally confirm the fact that there is no radioactive food being served. Well done, South Korea. Meanwhile the food available in Japan to me seems as one of the safest available. Just imagine some Fukushima tracing radioactivity was found during the last couple of years by any NGO in Japanese Food, what the uproar would've been. No, Japan will not let this happen, therefore any doubts about Olympic food being radioactive is just ridiculous and such accusations follow a different plan.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

His nappy is full after getting, finally someone to agree to something he actually hadn't given a thought about.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

With the IOC such an established authority on food safety in regions contaminated with radionuclides, I am at last ready to eat, eat, eat.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Abe looks like he has eaten something dodgy and followed through in this photo.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

any Olympic chef de mission can test the food

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I'm supposing what they mean by "safe" in the article, refers to being free from radioactive contamination.

I'm sure it is.

But re "safe" in general terms, there is a lack of clarity in describing exactly what is meant by safe.

For example I understand it's been a huge struggle to source non-chemical - organic - raw foods for the olympics as required by olympic protocol as there are few primary producers in Japan producing such.

And food labelling laws here are way behind many other countries with the manner and way of listing all ingredients etc.

The Japanese agricultural industry is one of the largest users of chemical herbicides / pesticides in the world, second I believe to only China.

So when it comes to "food safety", we need to be aware that delicious and safe are 2 entirely different concepts.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

It is the safest, it the most delicious, it is like a brand. in short, it is the best on the planet and that is why the price is a premium.

-14 ( +6 / -20 )

The food industry has a lot of experience labelling food with the appropriate label; making sure that the origin is a safe place, regardless where it was produced, grown or caught.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

Tokyo's intention to help alleviate the country's burden in accepting refugees from neighboring Syria.

Pledge number ?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

In general, most Japanese foods are safe to eat. However, they are not safe from the multitude of food mislabeling scams that lie about the origins of foods.

24 ( +26 / -2 )

Food here is safe. Was never able to get Fukushima peaches this year which was perplexing. They are the best.

-7 ( +9 / -16 )

I find food in Japan very safe and healthy. On a visit to LA a few years ago I couldn't handle the local food.

3 ( +14 / -11 )

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