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Top court holds state liable for asbestos diseases in workers

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Wow, only 50 years behind every other country.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

kyushubillToday  08:27 am JST

Wow, only 50 years behind every other country.

Took 'em long enough. Too little, too late.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Sad, 13 million yen will do nothing to these victims and their families.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Especially after the lawyers take 30%.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

In the late 1970's I worked in a London lab identifying asbestos and also visiting sites to take air samples and supervise the removal. Worked on one of the largest removals of blue asbestos which is the most deadly one.

In many countries, there are still large amounts of asbestos in buildings and hospitals.

Exposure takes more than 20 years to form Mesothelioma Cancer which is a very slow and painful way to die.

In the UK some types of asbestos were banned in 1985, but some asbestos continued to be used until a total ban in 1999.

Scientists believe that between 2000 and 2039, there will be 103,000 mesothelioma deaths; adding the deaths from other cancers and asbestosis will make the death toll significantly higher.

http://ibasecretariat.org/prof_japan.php

I think in Japan, asbestos was banned in 2002, but I believe there are millions of tons of asbestos out there. No idea how much is being removed.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

This is good news for my father in law, even though it won't cure his cancer!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

zichiToday  09:25 am JST

In the late 1970's I worked in a London lab identifying asbestos and also visiting sites to take air samples and supervise the removal. Worked on one of the largest removals of blue asbestos which is the most deadly one.

In many countries, there are still large amounts of asbestos in buildings and hospitals.

Exposure takes more than 20 years to form Mesothelioma Cancer which is a very slow and painful way to die.

There was abestos in my elementary, middle and high schools. All of those buildings have been detonated now, the last being my HS - 30 years after I graduated. And some classmates of mine and my little sister are now dead from cancer.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

starpunk

There was asbestos in my elementary, middle and high schools. All of those buildings have been detonated now, the last being my HS - 30 years after I graduated. And some classmates of mine and my little sister are now dead from cancer.

If those buildings were donated while still containing asbestos would have been an illegal way to deal with it. And highly dangerous, releasing asbestos into the atmosphere. Sorry to hear about your classmates and sister. Did they die from an asbestos form of cancer? Those would be unusual.

In Amagasaki near Osaka, there was an asbestos factory. Many workers got asbestos cancers. Their wives too from going home in their overalls and the wives washing them.

There are two ways to deal with asbestos. Removal under strict instructions involving making a plastic tent around the area and using an air pump to create a negative pressure to suck air in and preventing air from getting out. Workers in special protective suits PSE. Everything very controlled.

The other way is to encapsulate with plastic, like on pipes and then place warning signs the lagging is asbestos.

Donating a building would be a big mistake.

In the Japanese countryside, I see many farm and factory buildings with asbestos roofs. Congregated cement with white asbestos. Ok if left alone but precautions needed during demolish which often are not taken.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Zichi,

it's not only the deaths, even worse is the suffering people experience before that. I see it almost every day, the pain, the surgeries, the chemo therapy, and everything else.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

klausdorth

Zichi,

it's not only the deaths, even worse is the suffering people experience before that. I see it almost every day, the pain, the surgeries, the chemo therapy, and everything else.

Agreed 20 years of suffering before dying. Presently there is no cure for Mesothelioma.

http://plaza.umin.ac.jp/~FREAKIDS/english/kodomo_5_e.html

British Lung Association

https://www.blf.org.uk/support-for-you/asbestos-related-conditions/asbestosis

1 ( +1 / -0 )

KyushuBill...

Wow, only 50 years behind every other country.

Exactly! And every year a few less to pay out!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

in 1996 Atsugi base closed down it elementary DoDDs school, other buildings including the library and all classrooms and would not let anyone inside to claim their personall belongs. Everything was burned in the open air. Nice job.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It’s the cutting of asbestos which is the danger.

Once in place the danger is low.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That’s unbelievable and in most cases complete nonsense. The planners and construction companies are responsible for having used such material during building process. The state or government didn’t order or insist by law on using asbestos when constructing buildings. Also it is impossible for a state to set rules for every situation or anything that other people are doing. They just should have worn masks or filters in any case while working with unknown material. That is part of their job, not something a state or government can demand or guarantee in all situations and at all times. They should have complained about that to the responsibility people of that time, including their bosses at the building site and to themselves, for not wearing the according professional clothing and tools , filters, masks, gloves and such.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Sven Asai,

nobody at that time knew about the danger of asbestos! The government, however, found out later (way later than other countries) what was going on. Direct actions (like in other countries) were not taken in Japan, it took years of meetings, considerations, and planning to finally come up with an idea. To implement that idea took again some time (more than in other countries) - so, please, don't blame it on the workers who had to deal and later take care of that mess! ( "...... they just should have worn masks or filters ....." and ".....They should have complained ...... and themselves,  for not wearing the according professional clothing and tools , filters, masks, gloves and such".)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

kyushubill

Wow, only 50 years behind every other country.

That is not correct. Asbestos was banned in the UK in 1999 but the dangers of asbestos were well known in the 1970s. Japan stopped asbestos in 2002 and banned it in 2008. only nine years later than the UK.

http://ibasecretariat.org/lka_japan_tot_asb_ban_by_2008.php

Since the 1970s in the UK, there has been a program to remove it or encapsulate it. I don't know what the situation is in Japan with removal. The UK removers must be trained and licenced contractors. Part of my work was to train them and then supervise and finally decide if the removal area was safe and free of asbestos.

Most of the asbestos comes from mines in South Africa, Cape Industries had to pay millions in compensations.

Also from Australia. There is a small town that totally revolved around a blue asbestos mine. The miners brought it home with them. Most of the townsfolk have died from asbestos cancers. Without any compensation and the town is died out. The government banned people from entering.

Wittenoom: 1946-2007

https://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/publications/asbestos-wittenoom-tragedy-video

The problem was that asbestos is very good at what it's used for. It was difficult to find a replacement. The fibres of asbestos float in the air. The properties of blue asbestos fibres, the ratio of diameter to length of fibre give it good aerodynamic properties. White and brown asbestos are soft and quickly falls to the ground.

Originally, the removed asbestos was replaced with glass fibre. But tragically it was discovered after a couple of years, the fibres had the same aerodynamic properties as blue asbestos. Those fibres can into the big sacs at the end of the breathing tubes in the lungs. They have millions of pores that become blocked by asbestos fibres. You lose more and more of your ability to breathe. Then you get asbestos cancers in the lung lining.

The glass fibre had to be removed too. Rock wool or mineral wool is the only suitable insulation material.

kurisupisu

It’s the cutting of asbestos which is the danger. Once in place the danger is low.

That is only true of white asbestos mixed with cement to form roof panels. But when they demolish a building with it no precautions are taken.

There were many other uses of asbestos. Pipe lagging. Fire prevention in walls and ceiling. Brake linings.

I spent several months in the London underground measuring the amounts of asbestos from the train brakes.

It is estimated that an average of 13 people a day in the UK die from conditions caused by previous exposure to asbestos – more than double the number of people who die on the roads.

The first health fears associated with asbestos were raised at the end of the 19th century. Asbestosis, an inflammatory condition affecting the lungs that cause shortness of breath, severe coughing and other damage to the lung was described in medical writing in the 1920s.

https://www.nationalasbestos.co.uk/news/why-is-asbestos-still-causing-thousands-of-deaths-a-year/

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The governments of countries decide on building codes. Industrial accidents and diseases. Which materials are safe to use and those which are not. They also decide their own Health and Safety rules. On building sites workers have to wear safety equipment or be fined. The government decides how fast we can drive on the roads. Our entire lives are regulated.

But when a government knows the dangers but does not alert people and industry they are the guilty party.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Good decision.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There are major concerns with asbestos remaining in buildings. The World Trade Centers had asbestos which was released when they came down.

https://www.asbestos.com/world-trade-center/

What happens when there's a major earthquake like in Kobe and Tohuku.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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