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Teenager ashamed of given name 'Prince' adopts traditional one

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Good on him.

Why on earth couldn’t his parent foresee the problems with naming him ‘Oji’? It just boggles the mind.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

Good one for the kid. While I understand that those names truly meant something to the parents, the kids wearing those names often end up getting made fun of up until their working years. This problem however is not confined to Japan as well, I've seen children having odd names like Daenerys. Really ?

8 ( +10 / -2 )

I’m so glad my parents went with a name that raises no eyebrows and suits my mediocrity.

Prince Rogers Nelson was an incredible musician who lived up to the name, though.

Venus Williams was another.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Google Manny Pacquiao's daughters names if you want some bad names.

These キャバクラ names need to stop lol....Pikachu...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There are many names that parents need to rethink. These days a lot of parents in America seem to be naming their children after air-freshener scents like apple-cinamon.

While Prince seems like a strange name in Japan, I have met 6 people with that name in America throughout my life. Royalty was another name that I have come acrossed multiple times.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Some those names and Kanji configurations out there make you think the parents want their daughter to be an AV actress.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

So he didn't change his name to "かつては王子と呼ばれた芸術家"?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Why on earth couldn’t his parent foresee the problems with naming him ‘Oji’? It just boggles the mind.

Looks to me as if was Ojisama, Oji alone does not translate to prince. Good on the guy to change it!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Yeah a Name is something very important which usually stays for you whole life so parents should really think well about it ... the same is happening in every other Country as well sadly.

You know all these Kids named like towns ... so stupid.

In Germany as example most places won't allow you to name your Child "Adolf" as the name has a bad history and other names are usually not allowed most of the time as well still sometimes you get "weird" names allowed.

Not sure if it is okay to say "no you cannot name your kid ...." as it is the Parents choice but it is a good thing to tell them to think about it twice

3 ( +3 / -0 )

At our old place there was a mom to a girl a little younger than my daughter... her name was 月光 pronounced ムンライト. Hope she gets to do this when she's older.

Meanwhile my daughter has a completely average, everyday English name and my Japanese MIL recoiled in horror when we first told her her name when she was born because she hates 'kirakira' names and she thought we would screw her for life. Sooooo....

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I can't believe any parent would name their boy "Oji-Sama." That's even worse than "Dweezel."

Akaike began to think about changing his name after becoming a ninth grader. Whenever he provided his name to create membership cards, such as for karaoke, shop employees thought it was a fake one and repeatedly tried to confirm its authenticity.

The boy was shocked when female students burst out laughing when he introduced himself during high school.

Thanks a lot, mom.

He was never bullied 

I find that hard to believe. His classmates must have been better than most then.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The Teenager formerly known as Oji.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

"Why on earth couldn’t his parent foresee the problems with naming him ‘Oji’?"

Probably because his parents were very young and still in youthful "kawaii"culture.

It happens.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

it is good to hear such a good name, about 20 years ago i heard one crazy parent give their child name : oni which means demon, this is far still good than oni

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The teenager formerly know as Prince.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

In Okinawa I met a young woman named Nana, written in the Roman numeral 7. I asked her if that was legal, she said that numbers are allowed in names and quoted Lupin the 3rd as an example.

Not that I would name my child a number, but she seemed to like her name/number.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

We setup here some rules for when we have kids.

1-A name that can be used both in Japan or overseas, nothing too complicated or overly japanese like "Tsutomu", "Haruto" etc

2-And yes, a "readable" name that won't require our kid to explain his own name throughout his whole life.

3-A name without crazy big kanjis that won't make our kid sigh everytime he has to write his name on a piece of paper. (Just saw the other day a "Kaori-san" written as 香織)

富 とみ Tommy would be a choice for our boy I guess

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Good for another reason too. It is very difficult, almost impossible to change your name in Japan. This guy must have gone through the wringer to achieve it. Well done for him, and this must surely give hope to others.

My wife tried to change our daughter's name, but it took months and months, and she had to provide written proof that people had been calling her by another name regularly since birth. Unbelievable the bureaucracy to change something once written down and recorded in the Koseki Tohon registry!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

"His mother was unhappy with his decision but his father accepted it, telling him, "This is your life."

In other words it was Mum's idea.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Stupid parent syndrome on the rise.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

It must hurt to have your child reject the name you chose for them but I can understand. You could make a persons life miserable by giving them a funny name. Parents should be more considerate. The name is for someone else. It's not for you.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Met a kid years ago named after "Tiger Woods."

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Good for him. I'm glad my parents named me something conventional.

Even the Son of God was not given an odd name. "Jesus" (I believe it was "Yeshua" in the local language) was a rather common name in that society at that time.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Interesting, wholly understand the chaps wish to change his name, but why does it take a legal decision just to change a name, here and in most countries it just involves some paper work and inevitably a fee, so what is the rational for making it so difficult in Japan?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

He should've tossed his hair and put on tight cutout pants. Many people want to see him in concert ;)=

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Tossled not tossed

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Jennischiebel:

Believe it would be similar to josh today.

"Be healed, in the name of josh."

Doesn't quite have the same ring as his Latin name (Jesus).

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Nandakandamanda:

Ain't much easier in other country's to change your name either. Also, I remember someone who had the first name of Jean-luc. Odd (except in French-speaking areas), yes, but acceptable. It was the name of a Starfleet captain.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I have a European name but people call me Oji-sama all the time because i am smart and beautiful. I also refer to myself as Yo(余).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I don’t understand why it is such a big deal. The kid is 18, which makes him an adult. He could change his name to Jennifer if he wanted to. He could also change his family name if he so desired.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The given name is a debatable question.

But definitely parents who give a pet name to their children should better consider buying a pet instead.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

JimizoToday 04:24 pm JSTI’m so glad my parents went with a name that raises no eyebrows and suits my mediocrity.

Prince Rogers Nelson was an incredible musician who lived up to the name, though.

Venus Williams was another.

I fully agree 100% there. Venus was the Roman goddess of love, beauty, sex. Of course, most people now know more about the planet Venus - where the atmospheric + gravity conditions are oppressive and the climate is hotter than a pizza oven. Take it from there as you will.

On the same token, I knew someone in the military whose first name was 'Venus' and that person was a MAN.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Dirk TToday 08:51 pm JSTMet a kid years ago named after "Tiger Woods."

I knew a 'Phil Collins' and a 'Michael Jackson' in the service. Nothing unusual here. And I know a policeman named 'George Harrison' and there's a bird scientist with that name too. My Sweet Lord!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There's a woman who is an alumnus of my university whose first name is 'Sussudio'. There are other women with that name across America too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Starpunk:

Venus who was a man. Venus with a ---. ;)=

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Well, Governor Hogg, of Texas, named his daughter Ima.

Prince sounds better than that.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I remember some years ago, a parent gave his son a name "Akuma" (Devil). It was controversial.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

According to Japanese news stories, he was bullied as a kid.

Also, it has been explained to me that the name means more than just "prince". It is more like the JP equivalent of "Prince Charming". That is, the savior Prince that comes and sweeps a woman of her feet. I can see how that would be more embarrassing than just "Prince".

6 ( +6 / -0 )

 ...so what is the rational for making it so difficult in Japan?

If anything were easy in Japan, how could anyone avoid anything slightly uncomfortable with a tilt of the head and hiss between the teeth? Keeping everything (even the mundane) difficult is the cultural "get out of jail free" card. That and shoganai.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Parents shouldn't try to name their kids something different or unusual. Go with previously accepted, for the local nation, names. Do your kids a favor.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Recycling is the way to go with names. Look to your grandparents and their parents and you will find many suitable names. Works very well in my country and I am sure it applies to any country with some adaptation.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kawaii or Kowaii

Everyone in the classroom got scared, including teacher when new student introduced herself as KOWAII.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Recycling is boring. Haven't their been more than enough Michaels, Thomases, and Hiroyukis? Of course, some names are just kind of ridiculous - Ojisama?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

In Okinawa I met a young woman named Nana, written in the Roman numeral 7. I asked her if that was legal, she said that numbers are allowed in names and quoted Lupin the 3rd as an example.

Her parents would not have been able to register her name using the "Roman numeral" 7. It may have been her choice to use it herself but it is not her registered name. なな or 七 in Kanji is used in names and Lupin is a fictional character, not a good example.

However, numbers are quite common in many Japanese names 一二三 literally 1,2,3, is read Hifumi, 五十鈴(Isuzu) uses the kanji for 5 and 10 but it does not translated to 50 bells,

1 ( +1 / -0 )

 Of course, some names are just kind of ridiculous - Ojisama?

How would you like to be the poor boy that has to run around with the name Koushien!

The "ateji" way of reading some of these names is ridiculous! There was a famous case a number of years ago where the parents tried registering their child's name as 悪魔 (Akuma) which literally reads "devil", and thankfully the city office refused!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Didn't realise changing names would be such a problem in Japan, but I fully understand the desire to change one's name away from Ojisama. That's just awkward, on so many levels. People aren't going to believe it was the parents' idea and will assume the person is just trying to sound cool, as seemed to happen with Akaike here.

At the same time though, I understand the desire of parents to use more unique names rather than traditional ones. Names like Hiro or Sakura are a dime a dozen, but that doesn't mean it's wise to use an unusual name if it will lead to problems down the line (how the mother failed to see this coming is beyond me).

I've seen children having odd names like Daenerys. Really ?

Funny you should say that. A former colleague of mine has a daughter called Daenerys. I'm sure she'll change her name as soon as she can too. Luckily that's a lot easier to do over here in the UK than in Japan. That said, perhaps it's too easy in the UK. I remember reading a story about a guy who changed his surname to Pastysmasher. Enough said.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So he didn't change his name to "かつては王子と呼ばれた芸術家"?

This made my day. lol!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My cousin's wife is called Cleopatra.But we call her Patty or should I say,she said to call her Patty.Now that's pressure in a name.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I once taught a Japanese high school class with a boy named “Rhythm” and a girl “Melody”. I made them sit together.

Also changed my family name when I was 21 to Smallheath ..... Got fed up with all the giggles when receptionists called out ...”Mr Smallcock”

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I told my kids they could change their names if they want. A name can have a big impact on a career, especially in the public eye. When kids grow up, they should be encouraged to choose a name that reflects their dreams. It's kind of petty when fathers worry about "carrying on the family name." As though anyone cares.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In my jr. high school, I met two brothers whose names were "Hiho Silva" of Lone Ranger fame and "Sterling Silva" as in Sterling Silver and they were always teased by other students. I wonder if they changed their names after they became adults. There were other students whose last names were "Tampon" and "Penis" but that's another story.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Also changed my family name when I was 21 to Smallheath ..... Got fed up with all the giggles when receptionists called out ...”Mr Smallcock”

How one wouldn't choose "Bigcock" in that situation boggles the mind...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Well, look what the American (PRINCE) did with his name. Embrace your name and use it!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Her parents would not have been able to register her name using the "Roman numeral" 7.

That was the name on her student ID. Maybe Ryukyu University has a lax policy, but that was her name on an official ID document. Yes many Japanese names contain Kanji numbers, usually to indicate If the child is the 1st , 2nd, or 3rd born etc... I’m also aware Lupin the 3rd is fictional, but there are also many examples of names being passed from previous generations that are registered with a Roman numeral 2 or 3 or such.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Joe Blow; thanks for the LOL.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That was the name on her student ID. Maybe Ryukyu University has a lax policy, but that was her name on an official ID document. Yes many Japanese names contain Kanji numbers, usually to indicate If the child is the 1st , 2nd, or 3rd born etc... I’m also aware Lupin the 3rd is fictional, but there are also many examples of names being passed from previous generations that are registered with a Roman numeral 2 or 3 or such.

While I'm definitely not a pro on this, I've looked into names a fair bit, and I believe that legal names are required to be in kanji, hiragana or katanaka, or some combination of these, and that names cannot be registered in romaji, of which the number 7 is considered to be included. So if it was on her student ID, it would be more likely the school allowing her to use that, rather than being her legal name.

I may be entirely wrong though. But what you say does contradict what I've read in the past.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

We have some experience of another side of this. Our younger daughter has a Western-sounding name, but one which is not uncommon in Hong Kong/Taiwan. We found the characters used there for the name, and applied to register them since they had a very beautiful meaning. We were told several days later, however, that we could not use that name because one of the characters was not in the "acceptable" jou-you kanji. Since we had already used the phonetic name for our daughter for two weeks, we ended up having to replace the kanji in question with an acceptable one with the same sound. Because its a Western sound, there were few alternatives. The net result of all this is that our daughter has a spoken name we love, but when some Japanese people see it written down, they get taken aback in a "why did you use that character in your kid's name?" way. My daughter has a katakana surname (a good thing, I believe), so we did not want to use a katakana given name.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I’m not very knowledgeable on name registry regulations either, but that was the case for this certain Ryukyu Uni student I met.

Although I’m pretty sure a guy I know who has “the 3rd” in his name was able to get it registered when he took Japanese citizenship.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

On the same token, I knew someone in the military whose first name was 'Venus' and that person was a MAN

We had an undesignated Seaman whose last name was Tester. Yea, life was a bit rough for her.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Didn't realise changing names would be such a problem in Japan

I think it depends.

Sometimes it is easy and quick (In my case, I did some very simple paperwork explaining why name change is requested) and submitted to the local family court.

A few weeks later, received official document that says the name change was officially accepted/approved by the judge.

Brought it to the ward office, name was changed.

The whole process took less than a month, with simple paperwork, one visit to the family court, one visit to the ward office.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good that "Prince" was able change his name to a name more to his liking. At least his mother didn't name him "Pikachu".

Yes, parents should think twice about the names they choose for their children as it will impact them the rest of their lives. 

Then there are some names that don't mesh with surnames well. Either their parents didn't think of it or had a peculiar sense of humour. For example: I knew a guy named Robert Bong. He didn't like the nickname "Bob", especially when used with his last name. Heard a classic story about a man whose surname was "Lear" and named his daughter "Cystal Shanda". 

In the Philippines, I've ran across women with names like "Queenie", "Princess" (both had expensive tastes), "Lovely" (who was anything but), "Girlie" (she was over 30 at the time), and so forth. They were happy and comfortable with their names, though. 

Ah, but as the saying goes, "What's in a name"....

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Oh and one more thing..

If his name was simply Oji, that would not have been too bad (depending on the kanji, though) but to make your son Oji-sama, it is like "Your highness Prince".

Glad the boy's father was understanding and the glad the boy could get a name he's happy with.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Recycling is the way to go with names. Look to your grandparents and their parents and you will find many suitable names.

Shared family names is a genealogist's nightmare. Try fighting your way through pages and pages of Marys, Margarets, Georges and Williams, all with the same surname, all the children of people with the same names. Trying to sort out the generations is very, very confusing.

I don't think going completely rogue and calling your baby Prince Charming or Pokemon is a good idea, but borrowing granddad's name as is isn't such a good idea, either.

With Japanese names, a good compromise is to use one kanji from a family name and 'customise' it with another kanji. (For example, if Granddad is 英三郎 (Eisaburo), Dad might be 英次 (Eiji) and Junior could be 英太(Eita).

But the mum in the article really didn't think things through. If the kid's given name was Ojisama, then people being just normally polite would have to call him Ojisama-san, which is just plain silly.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And in a formal setting he would be Ojisama-sama, which is ludicrous.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

cleo - good point, so true.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

juminRheeMar. 12 11:34 pm JSTStarpunk:

Venus who was a man. Venus with a ---. ;)=

Since Venus is a planet, maybe this guy's parents believe in astrology. Still - Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Mercury are also planets known to the ancients and they are named after Roman GODS, not goddesses.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If his name was only “O-ji” or just Prince, it might matter less. The stupidity come from “-sama” afix, which can usually be translated as Mr. ,Sir. or even your highness.

( though O-ji sama is informal kind of usage, much like "my dear Prince Charming")

So it may be like "Prince highness" or "Mr. President" as the name.

"How are you, Mr. Prince highness ?"

"Hello, Mr.Mr.President."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Every country needs to adopt Germany's strict laws about baby names. Heck, with the rise of ridiculous baby names like "Audio Science", everyone should have to go before a judge with their baby name ideas before it can go on a birth certificate. Think of your kids, you nitwits...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Wait.... His name was "Oji-sama" and not just "Oji"?

So, was he addressed as "Oji-samasama"?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have a couple of acquaintances whose names were Sunflower and Clover respectively (yeah, hippie parents).

They've since changed their names to Alex and Chloe as soon as they turned adult.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I have a couple of acquaintances whose names were Sunflower and Clover respectively (yeah, hippie parents).

They've since changed their names to Alex and Chloe as soon as they turned adult.

And yet, you stuck with Willow.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

HalwickMar. 13 11:48 am JSTGood that "Prince" was able change his name to a name more to his liking. At least his mother didn't name him "Pikachu".

Yes, parents should think twice about the names they choose for their children as it will impact them the rest of their lives. 

Then there are some names that don't mesh with surnames well. Either their parents didn't think of it or had a peculiar sense of humour.

Ah, but as the saying goes, "What's in a name"....

Sometimes you can't tell how it will turn out. At one placed I've worked, a lady named Megan married a man with the surname of 'Love'. Her married name then became...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

At one placed I've worked, a lady named Megan married a man with the surname of 'Love'. Her married name then became...

Am I missing something?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Like that time a firefighter legally changed his name to Optimus Prime

https://www.savannahnow.com/do/2012-06-19/transformed-transformers-alien-robots-change-forms-lives-savannah

1 ( +1 / -0 )

PerformingMonkeyMar. 14 04:55 pm JSTAt one placed I've worked, a lady named Megan married a man with the surname of 'Love'. Her married name then became...

Am I missing something?

Say it out loud: 'Megan Love'. What does it sound like, phonetically?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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