national

U.S. Navy holds memorial service for 7 sailors killed in collision

25 Comments
By Mari Yamaguchi

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

25 Comments
Login to comment

These men entrusted their lives to very expensive safety systems that the US taxpayer paid for that were on board that vessel. Those systems failed and these men paid with their lives.

A complete, fair and public investigation should be held.

At the very least, their time of death should be accurately acknowledged.

1 ( +12 / -11 )

The U.S. Navy paid tribute on Tuesday to seven sailors who were killed

Pay tribute to them by bringing those responsible to justice

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Why would anyone thumbs-down a comment asking for justice, that doesn't imply guilt by either party involved?

9 ( +12 / -3 )

RIP sailors, condolences to the families.

It's a noble death for a soldier to die for his country. But one thing to die on a battlefield, and another thing to die in a stupid accident that could have been easily prevented. I hope those responsible for this waste of young lives will be severely punished.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, surveyed the ship's damage and praised its crew for saving it from sinking

i can't understand this. he didn't blame the crew, but praised them? saving the ship is more important than lives?

Ordinarily, Japan has the right to investigate maritime collisions in its territorial waters, but in the case of U.S. warships

if this happened 50km from Manhattan, would american investigators be denied access? reminds me of the advise for marines in Okinawa, if you do a crime, get to the base as quick as possible.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

One of the sailors died while selflessly rescuing several of his fellow sailors who were too injured to escape the compartment. I hope the Navy fully respects his sacrifice by naming a ship after him.

Their story will eventually be told.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Ordinarily, Japan has the right to investigate maritime collisions in its territorial waters, but in the case of U.S. warships

if this happened 50km from Manhattan, would american investigators be denied access?

If it's a Russian warship paying a visit

4 ( +4 / -0 )

saving the ship is more important than lives?

Saving the ship saved lives. There were many injured who would have never escaped the ship if it sank.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

@ viking68 - he should get a posthumous Medal of Honor he gave the ultimate sacrifice

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This is a fitting ceremony for these seven brave men. They died in service to their country while helping to maintain regional peace. I am still praying for these brave men, those who were injured and their famies and friends.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Those systems failed and these men paid with their lives."  This is a rush to judgment.

And so are many of the other comments.

Let's wait for all facts to come in.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Hi, their memory. Sometimes, mistakes are made that lead to fatal catastrophe. Investigation will probably show what was causing it. The early time, where the man is still not fit may be another factor....Who knows that..Regard kindly

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Let's wait for all facts to come in.

No. No. No. Bush wants someone to be punished now!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

No. No. No. Bush wants someone to be punished now!

If this happened to an airplane, all similar aircraft would be grounded until a safety investigation would absolve any mechanical safety system or procedure.

Here we have a fatal accident without a clear explanation and the serious possibility of either a major technical fault or gap in protocol.

These ships are out at sea as we speak relying on the same tech, and citizens with private boats are sharing the open water with these destroyers at night.

The seafaring public has a right to peace of mind, and so do the sailors who sleep on these vessels at night.

A modern destroyer was totally blind to a 30,000 cargo ship. How is that possible?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Burning Bush

"If this happened to an airplane, all similar aircraft would be grounded until a safety investigation would absolve any mechanical safety system or procedure."  That is not true.  Planes crash and the same types keep on flying.  After an investigation the FAA gives their understanding of the cause or causes and makes recommendations.

"A modern destroyer was totally blind to a 30,000 cargo ship."  Again, we don't know that for a fact.   I don't believe in "accidents."  Something or someone was responsible, but  don't  you think we should wait for more information before jumping to conclusions?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

viking68

I heard that as well and, if true, I agree with you completely.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Something or someone was responsible, but don't you think we should wait for more information before jumping to conclusions?

My personal opinion is that the US Navy knows exactly what happened, but they are willfully stalling and that they never intend to release a detail investigation.

The fact that they are sticking with the 2:20 am accident time on paper while accepting the 1:30 am accident in general shows that their primary concern at this point is CYA.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Burning Bush

My personal opinion is that the US Navy knows exactly what happened, but they are willfully stalling and that they never intend to release a detail investigation.

On what is your opinion founded? Have you any firsthand experience with the Navy, particular regarding how we investigate collisions at sea? The fact that you evidently believe that the Aegis system aboard an Arleigh-Burke Class DDG has anything to do with navigation or collision avoidance or that you are actually applying SOPs related to aviation mishaps to a maritime collision like this speaks volumes as to how little you know on this subject. Your continuous refusal to listen to posters who actually know what they're talking about is absurd. Stop demanding a hasty and incomplete investigation and a drumhead trial. The public, and these seven Sailors, deserve better.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The Ship would not have sank! Navy ships have what we call watertight integrity, the only way it would have sank is if no one followed protocol. I was in the Navy for a while and I can tell you that 99% of the time they know what happened within a few hours, but then they try and figure ways to cover it up or play the blame game.

Sailors get bored, looking out at an ocean for a while can also make your mind wander. Our ship hit a few other ships once, we were on the port side and came up on two Korean fishing boats and hit them both with are #1 elevator, was never in the news, and the CO was never canned, like he should have been. They make out as if every sailor was a hero, but that is just a diversion, my Navy pals and I talked about this and the hero stories sound like sea stories to us. The CO should have been canned by now, but if they do that, it is the same thing as admitting guilt in the public eye!

I also still can not understand why the CO was sleeping, our CO's were always on the bridge at times like that, near land or in a busy lane.

I know I will get thumbed down for this post, but I am just being honest, sailors of the United States Navy are just as human as the Filipino seamen, they can make the same amount of mistakes and make just as many excuses, I am not saying I know what happened, but I guarantee, the Seamen had more sea time than the Navy guys.

I have worked with both Seamen and Sailors, and also been a part of a few investigations, sometimes it was mechanical failure, and sometimes it was the excuse of mechanical failure. The only way they will ever really know 100% is if the U.S Navy gives up all the information they have, but I doubt that will ever happen!

"The United States has promised three separate investigations of its own into the incident" We all know how long that will take and how the results will most likely turn out, maybe I am wrong, but in my experience........

0 ( +1 / -1 )

he fact that you evidently believe that the Aegis system aboard an Arleigh-Burke Class DDG has anything to do with navigation or collision avoidance

I got that information from CNN. I guess my confidence in them was misplaced, as apparently they posted fake news as usual. Anyways, here is the quote from CNN that confirms that the AEGIS is in fact used for the navigation.

To help determine what happened, investigators will download radar data from the ship's Aegis weapons system, which records routine details on position, course, speed and any nearby ships or aircraft. Navigation and radar data will also be gathered from the cargo ship.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/06/22/politics/uss-fitzgerald-investigation-update/index.html

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It's a noble death for a soldier to die for his country.

It's nothing of the sort. It's a senseless waste of life. There is nothing noble about dying because of the whims of governments in conflict.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Toasted Heretic

There is nothing noble about dying because of the whims of governments in conflict.

So true, I don't know how many young relatives I have talked to that have decided to join the military, and when I asked them why, they say the same thing " Because I am willing to die for my country", I have to tell them if you are under attack, then you should be willing to fight for your country, but not have the mindset of dying for it! I am ex-military and I never once thought about dying for my country.

I blame Movies and TV for that type of brainwashing, everyone is a hero, and every battle won, secures democracy at home. Things like classical conditioning, appealing to nationalism or patriotism, and the use of virtue words like hero and democracy, always keep the recruiters offices full.

I believe if you sign the dotted line and join, and then die in battle, you just died while doing your job! Wrong place, wrong time, just like people who are hit by cars, or die in a fire, the word hero is way overused in today's society, it has lost its true meaning in the last few decades. Now if you jumped on a grenade to save children, well then maybe it is deserved! I truly feel for the families, I do, and maybe it in someway it eases the pain of losing a loved one, but calling them heroes just because they died while on a Navy vessel is wrong in my book, but that is just me, and I am sure most people will disagree!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Middleoftheroad

Would you mind divulging just what you did in the Navy and for how long?

The CO should have been canned by now, but if they do that, it is the same thing as admitting guilt in the public eye!

I don't dispute the fact that CDR Benson will indeed be relieved of duty, in time, but statements like the one above suggest that you may not know as much as you think you know about how the Navy works, particularly in regards to investigating mishaps and conducting JAGMANs.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

USNinJapan2

 I know what happens when investigating mishaps and what happens when conducting a JAGMAN, and if I remember correctly they have about 30 days after convening for a report to be given, but I am sure that will be extended in this case.

I will not give out any personal information, but I will tell you I have been out of the Navy for over thirty years, so your Navy and my Navy are two totally different worlds.

I knew a Captain who was relieved of duty two weeks after he took command of his ship after a fire broke out, they did not lollygag along about it, and in that fire, no one was injured or killed, but in other accidents I have witnessed, it was like it never happened, business as usual, but like I said, your Navy and my Navy, two different worlds!

I am not going to debate how investigations are conducted, because every investigation is different, and I am not a JAG lawyer!

Remember, what I said in my previous post " I am not saying I know what happened" and "in my experience".

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I will not give out any personal information

Wise. Even if you're goaded into doing so; don't.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites