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What Japanese think about the hostage crisis

20 Comments
By NORIKO KITANO

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This should more accurately be 'What do a few elderly, mostly male, retired Japanese think about the hostage crisis'. I don't think this is a very diverse sampling of actual Japanese opinion on the situation.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

How do most Japanese feel, well around Tokyo these two Japanese citizens decided on their own to be in a place that is known to be dangerous and therefore put themselves in harms way. They knew full well what to expect at the worst being executed and hence it occurred. The responsibility lies with themselves for their own actions not the taxpayers expense by using the government. One may argue that Abe share in some of the blame by being there and announcing to the world support money against ISIS, that instead can be used in many metro Tokyo areas that are impoverished. Instead the Diet fails to address the social issues in urbanization and economy. These two were already captives and the only thing that may have changed is that the execution date was accelerated.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

It always makes feel feel bad when I hear Japanese people blame kidnapping victims for their situation. When I hear people mention tax money and when these clowns utter their unempathetic opinions I get a clearer uderstanding of how Japanese people are. It's quite pathetic. But it says alot about this place.

-5 ( +10 / -14 )

“I cannot sympathize with them, because they have caused Japan a lot of trouble. ... Japan is not that rich. Japan cannot afford it. We have lots of domestic problems such as health care.”

— Akiyo Tsunokawa, 77, homemaker.

Good grief. No empathy whatsoever for her own country's citizens abroad. And problems with socialized health care? What's up with that?

“I feel Abe’s misguided shallow acts have trigged this ransom demand"

Good grief! It's all Abe's fault! Really? I don't think so.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

I agree, no civilized country can afford to try and buy off scum like Daesh. That's 100% correct. No one should try and bother to deal with brainwashed barbarians.

That said, it isn't the victims who are to blame for their fate, however foolhardy they might have been.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Donna PesaniJAN. 27, 2015 - 07:32PM JST This should more accurately be 'What do a few elderly, mostly male, retired Japanese think about the hostage crisis'. I don't think this is a very diverse sampling of actual Japanese opinion on the situation.

1,000,000% agree. Ridiculous.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

One life saved is worth the price. On the other end is absolutely prohibited give money to finance terror. Time is against the japanese and there must be a solution working these 3 pressure points. An innocent human life, no bargain with terror and lack of time. I'm really sorry Kenji has faced the devil on his journey. We all should try to figure ourselves on his situation longin to be saved but headed towards a gruesome death.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It always makes feel feel bad when I hear Japanese people blame kidnapping victims for their situation. When I hear people mention tax money and when these clowns utter their unempathetic opinions I get a clearer uderstanding of how Japanese people are. It's quite pathetic. But it says alot about this place.

Every American I talk to about American hostages blame the victim too. A bad day at the office?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Great! Those interviews from OLD CONSERVATIVE JAPANESE MEN AND WOMEN!!!

What another farce comedy!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Each person, old or not is entitled to express their views. Keep with the real problem, two men are about to be murdered. Regardless of whether they put themselves there or not. If we focus on people's views we are likley to get side tracked, bickering. There needs to be a global movement of peace. Peace between religions, peace between countries, peace between each other, and peace with ourselves, especially the past (wars, fights, even within ourselves). Looking at the heart of the matter, that we are all from the same family, i.e. 'human' would be a good start. But I have no answers on how it can be done, really. But, I do know that we all, you, me, our families, our friends, communities, nations - all need to look inside, through all our superficial conflicts, anger, guilt, hate, revenge, selfishness and see what's really inside of us - kindness, compassion, selflessness, hope, peace, fun, happiness, etc etc. We might even find that we all have something in common - what might that be I ask?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So, opinion over this incident is pretty divided among the population? What's new?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I've been surprised at the lack of anger directed toward IS about the situation. It's as if most Japanese don't blame militant Islamists for being violent.

When this story started, I was hopeful that Japanese would caring about how people behave and what happens in other parts of the world. Instead, I see most people blaming the hostages and not talking about IS. Failing to hold IS morally responsible equates them to animals. It says we can't expect any better of them.

“Unfortunately bad people exist no matter what. ... We need to accept the fact that the Islamic State exists. It’s like you hate hairy caterpillars but you cannot eradicate them.”

Jeeze, I really don't know what to say if your going to resign yourself to evil in the world as you would resign yourself to insect pests every summer.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Failing to hold IS morally responsible equates them to animals. It says we can't expect any better of them.

So, basically what you wanted to say is that Japanese are animals? Feels pretty good to get your emotional, racist prejudices off your chest? All humans are animals, apparently some far more than most

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

No... thats... not what I wanted to say....

(Japanese) failing to hold IS morally responsible equates them (IS) to animals.

I'm saying the perspective that IS are just bad people in the world and there's nothing we can do about it is akin to sayin IS are like animals and we can't expect better behavior from people like them.

You misread me.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@Knox Harrington. I couldnt have said it better. Whats even more pathetic though is most foreigners here agree with them.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Fatalism of those blind to how self-defeating Uchi vs Soto is.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Follow Israel's policy. No negotiations for hostages. And in the long run, no one takes Israelis as hostages, Each country, as a citizen is bound to be responsible,. So Sad but true,

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When we don't support meeting ISIS demands to save Goto it is not because we are unsympathetic at least I'm not I think Goto is a great guy and a hero for going to Syria to try and help his friend, but we can not let them get anything out of this. Unless there is some way of rescuing Goto without giving in to any ISIS demands we need to let him die no negotiating with terrorists. If I was Goto I would be absoluetely miserable if ISIS was about to extract a ransom or hostage swap using me I would must rather die and see them get nothing

0 ( +0 / -0 )

DanielJP Jan. 28, 2015 - 02:58PM JST Unless there is some way of rescuing Goto without giving in to any ISIS demands we need to let him die no negotiating with terrorists.

Every country, including Japan has the ability and the right to make decisions. Hostage taking and hostage swaps have been a common form of conflict zone commerce in the Middle East for as long as they have fought for territory and power. Much the same held true in the Europe of the Middle Ages. Hostages are currency. They are power levers, and they are usually more valuable alive than dead. The reality is that the U.S. government does negotiate for the release of U.S. hostages, and they clearly do this because they decide the benefits outweigh the risks.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Patrick Mullen:

" Follow Israel's policy. No negotiations for hostages. And in the long run, no one takes Israelis as hostages, Each country, as a citizen is bound to be responsible,. So Sad but true, "

Actually, Israel has done several hostage swaps with Hamas and the PLO, typically exchanging one kidnapped Israeli citizen against dozens of imprisoned Arab terrorists. However, Hamas and the PLO also know that the IDF would rescue the hostages at second's notice the moment they found out their location. This of course is not the case here. Abe has nobody to swap, and the JSDF is unable + unwilling to do anything.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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