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Woman dies from tick-borne disease after bitten by stray cat

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Rabies would be the first concern on my mind, of which you are equally guaranteed death if not treated.

Andy, Japan has been rabies free since 1957.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

OMG! People, have a thought ever crossed your mind that initially it was a Japanese human being who threw the cat away, and another Japanese human being, who did not help the cat in the first place!

your dislike for strays is so displaced it's dispicable.

my local park has a sign asking people not to leave their pets there. Go get angry at those people, not at the creatures who with little wash and love will become pets.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The problem is that if you feed the stray cats they multiply, and then you end up with even more "starving cats". So which is more humane?

Trap-Neuter-Release.

I guess it is possible that a stray cat got to the eggs, but they weren't eaten. One more reason to kill the stray cats and crows

The cats and crows in the city probably do more good overall removing rodents & roaches and clearing away carrion. (Cats introduced into pristine rural areas are a problem.)

Apart from moronic neighbours and feral cats, the egg-dropping culprit could be the bird parents. Every year we have swallows nesting under our eaves, and occasionally we find smashed eggs or even newly hatched chicks on the ground: it seems the parents discard anything they consider unviable, so that they can concentrate on rearing the ones more likely to survive.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I guess it is possible that a stray cat got to the eggs, but they weren't eaten. One more reason to kill the stray cats and crows. They pretty much destroyed the beautiful fauna in cities and suburbs.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I'm at my wits end with Japanese neighbors. I had a Bulbul nest in a small tree outside our duplex this spring. The neighbors, IMO, took one egg and threw it down by our door, and just dropped another egg under the nest. I told my wife she better not destroy the nest but the neighbors did it. Then, the neighbor, with the help of my wife trimmed the tree and destroyed the nest.

why? Because the Bulbul is too noisy in their garden, that they spend NO time in besides trimming it. Not noisy for us as the bird didn't want to give away its nesting area.

Yet stray ray cats all over the place! Friggen crows all over the place! They only reason the Bulbul has survived this long is because of its noisy screeching. Which we hear all the time around here and you get used to it. Besides, it would only be 1 1/2 months until the young birds are gone and you can destroy the nest. They can't put up with it for 6 weeks? They're retired. No problem destroying life. But talk about killing cereal cats or crows? No way!

Pathetic!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The problem is that if you feed the stray cats they multiply, and then you end up with even more "starving cats". So which is more humane? It's a difficult question.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

you say you love animals but refer to "stupid old ladies" taking pity on starving cats.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No stray dogs, only cats. Stupid old ladies feed them.they are like disease ridden pidgeons. Native animals are ok, but feral? My friend pays a load for dog vet, but loves and cares for her. But I love animals so difficult call.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

There are plenty of stray cats in my neighborhood, and they're not all that different from the local wildlife. Best not to touch.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Are we Assuming she was correctly diagnosed? This is Japan, after all.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

What's with this 'Western Japan' palaver? I think it's safe to assume that most of those who visit this site have some knowledge of the facts of Japanese geography and can be trusted being told exactly where the story happened instead of the generic location label 'Western Japan'. The same thing if it happened in Boston, and all we were given was the vague 'Eastern United States'.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

why in the world would you take a stray cat to a vet? sorry, that's not kindness, that's just plain st****.

Then I must be a major st****. In my time I've taken umpteen stray and abandoned kitties and pups to the vet to get them checked out and innoculated so that they're ready to go to new homes; it's a lot easier to get a cat or dog adopted if you can state categorically that it's healthy, wormed and up to date with its inoculations.

Why would you not go to clinic or hospital the same or following day if bitten by a stray anything? Rabies would be the first concern on my mind

While it might be common sense to us, it's really not a well known concept here, yet.

Rabies is not really a problem in Japan. It's an island nation, and decades of systematic inoculating of all household pets means that you're only ever likely to find it, if at all, way out in the back of beyond, in the odd racoon dog or bat. If I were bitten by a stray cat or dog, my first reaction would not be to worry about rabies.

What isn't a well-known concept yet in some other countries is the idea that it is not common sense to live in mortal fear of being bitten by a domestic animal.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

why in the world would you take a stray cat to a vet?

While we don't know in this particular case, it may have been to have it spayed or neutered. That's a thing people do, and perhaps you can reason out why. Try hard.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There is no effective medicine to treat the disease.

Very scary. At least Lyme disease is treatable if you start treatment soon enough.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Andy, probably because here in Japan, the phenomenon of going to the hospital after being bitten by a stray animal, for a tetanus shot at least, is relatively unknown. While it might be common sense to us, it's really not a well known concept here, yet.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Why would you not go to clinic or hospital the same or following day if bitten by a stray anything? Rabies would be the first concern on my mind, of which you are equally guaranteed death if not treated.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

why in the world would you take a stray cat to a vet? sorry, that's not kindness, that's just plain st****.

Yeah! Compassion is stupidity. What a rube, trying to help an animal. She deserves to be dead.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

I just did a quick Google on this disease and there has been 96 cases in western Japan since 2013 with nearly a third (31%) proving to be fatal. It is native to China and Korea with the Japanese strain appearing relatively recently in 2013. However, from what I read, this is the first case of someone contracting the disease from a cat and not directly from a tick. This is alarming and should be getting the Japanese health ministry jumping. If domestic cats are carrying the disease, feral cats must also be carrying it. I'd say it's time to start culling all the stray and feral cats and advising domestic cat owners to get flee and tick collars on their pets. At present, there is no treatment for this disease. It has symptoms similar to meningitis and does not respond to antibiotics. Scary stuff!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

why in the world would you take a stray cat to a vet? sorry, that's not kindness, that's just plain st****. gump was right all along: stupid is as stupid does.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

A big family of stray cats in my neighborhood. I like cats but avoid these ones. The neighbors feed them, making the problem worse.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Ok, the woman was doing a kindly thing by taking a stray to the vet, she gets bitten by the cat, contracts a deadly disease and dies.

Hell of a way to go, I hope she rests in peace.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

How old was the woman? It seems all the cases of death, or most of them, involve the elderly.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

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