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Woman falls to death from 2,400-meter mountain ridge

22 Comments

A Tokyo woman who was climbing in the Northern Alps slipped from a 2,400-meter-high mountain ridge and fell to her death on Monday, police said.

Akiko Hashimoto, 60, was hiking on a ridge between Mt Okuhotaka-dake, which crosses the Nagano-Gifu border, and Mt Nishiokuhotaka-dake, when she slipped and fell on the Gifu side of the mountain at around 1:15 p.m., police said. A fellow climber notified authorities, and a helicopter crew located Hashimoto's body about five hours after the accident.

According to police, Hashimoto and four friends had set out hiking on Sunday from the Nagano side of the mountain. The group had just exited a snowy valley and walked about 400 meters when Hashimoto fell.

© News reports

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

22 Comments
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I seriously doubt she fell 2400 meters or this would be one of the World's best base-jumping spots. Perhaps she fell from a ridge located 2400 meters above sea-level?

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very poor headline. Clearly not at all based in reality.

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2400 meters? She must have got some huge air.

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"The group had just exited a snowy valley"

And this is in June.

Tragic.

Agreed, bad headline. The rest of the article's OK.

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It is an eye-grabber, which is half the battle won in the news biz.

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It is an eye-grabber, which is half the battle won in the news biz.

And it is inaccurate too, which is all the battle lost.

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Not to be morbid, but I wonder how long it would take to fall 2,400m. Perhaps I should have paid more attention in physics class.

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Not to be morbid, but I wonder how long it would take to fall 2,400m.

based on g=9.8 m/s2 about 22 seconds in a vaccuum but I doubt you would make faster than 50 metres per second in the lower atmostphere so around 40 seconds I would guess

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2400 meters?? did she landed on sea level?

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This is so sad, forget being pedantic, just feel sorry for the poor woman for goodness' sake!

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The ridge is high, but there is no way to fall 2400m in that area. http://watchizu.gsi.go.jp/watchizu.html?latitude=36.2847222222222&longitude=137.652083333333

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This is obviously not a safe mountain for hiking. All hikers should have to wear parachutes when hiking up, in the even that this happens to them!

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Fell? What about slide down.

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RIP. You know, hiking Kita dake which is 3,193 meters is on my "To DO List" when I visit Japan, but perhaps I should reconsider.

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It is well known that climbing, especially in snowy conditions, is a dangerous sport. People who climb are usually well aware of that. I don't think that hiking comes with as much danger, but if you are worried about falling, then don't do it (although I imagine it's pretty unlikely, since we don't see articles like this every day).

A 2,400m sheer drop somewhere in Nagano? Now that would be a spectacular thing to see if it were accurate.

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you are all reading the headline wrong. the peak is 2,400M and she fell from it. The rest is all your fertile imaginations running away with you. No where does it imply a fall of 2,400M.

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Spudman, they changed the headline, at first it was "Woman falls 2,400-meter to death from mountain ridge", or something like that.

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A very sad and tragic death - If Akiko had a video camera with her when she slipped and fell to her death all the viewers would have experienced her final moments before she hit the rocks....Mountain climbing should be banned and instead helicopter rides should be encouraged for the mountaineers. Farakh Malik

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I don't think she was climbing, I think she was just walking and got too close to the edge. Tragic, but after a few helicopter crashes are you going to ban those too?

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This is a classic Japanese news article be it the Japan Times, Yomiuri Shimbun or the Mainichi - no details to clarify a misleading headline.

Of course the poor woman didn't fall 2,400 meters - she wasn't climbing in the Andes or Himalayas. There isn't a ledge anywhere in Japan (or anywhere else for that matter) featuring a 2,400 meter vertical drop.

She fell off a trail (maybe only 20 or 30 feet - doesn't take much) on a mountain that is 2,400 meters tall, or so one must assume.

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Again, the woman did not fall to her death from a 2,400-meter mountain ridge. She either fell from a ridge somewhere on a mountain at the 2,400-meter level or she fell from a ridge somewhere on a mountain that is 2,400-meters tall. There are no mountains in Japan that have ledges with a 2,400-meter vertical drop.

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I guess one can see that this is JAPANtoday from that the discussion centers around mathematics, physics, and technicalities...

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