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Woman in Japan dies of Oz virus in world 1st; possibly tick-borne

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SFTS is a much more valid reason to prevent tick bites, but for people that routinely go to the woods or work in the fields it is not realistic to expect them to prevent completely tick bites.

Until specific vaccines or treatment are developed (difficult seeing how most infections are not even recognized) the usefulness of detecting the virus is reduced, but at least it could help keeping patients at higher risk (like the victim) under stronger vigilance.

2 ( +11 / -9 )

There is a very fine healthcare system and good doctors.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

Fear mongering starting? Nothing in the article points to the Oz virus as the cause of death.

-13 ( +7 / -20 )

Fear mongering starting? Nothing in the article points to the Oz virus as the cause of death.

Yeah - apart from the fact that it mentions it has been medically confirmed.

Read through the story.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Yep, the media will try their best to whip everyone into a frenzy.

remember monkey pox. What an overblown farce that was. Please, let’s not get carried away.

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

Yep, the media will try their best to whip everyone into a frenzy.

remember monkey pox. What an overblown farce that was. Please, let’s not get carried away.

You can allow yourself to be terrified.

Or - take the sensible approach, and react to the story by taking precautions next time you are hiking or camping.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

These reports send those who get carried away with the idea that the media is trying to get people carried away into a bit of a frenzy.

They are a bit excitable.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Fear mongering starting? Nothing in the article points to the Oz virus as the cause of death.

The woman had the infection with the virus (that have been proved to be pathogenic for animals) and later died, it is not farfetched to see a relationship.

And no, saying there was one single fatal case is very far from fear mongering, specially because other arbovirus caused diseases produce more deaths routinely in Japan.

Yep, the media will try their best to whip everyone into a frenzy.

If that were the case it would have mentioned the many other vector borned diseases that cause fatal victims every year, obviously this is not the case.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Just because it is medically confirmed is no need to get worried but go ahead. Guess now that Corona is over you need something to occupy your time.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Just because it is medically confirmed is no need to get worried but go ahead. Guess now that Corona is over you need something to occupy your time

The only people getting overexcited here are those who see any report like this as fear mongering.

It’s so predictable. It’s like a reflex motion.

Try to relax. It’s just a report.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Ticks carry many serious infections. It is wise to check yourself thuroughly if you have been in the forest. I got one that had been on a poisonous snake when I was a teenager. It put me in hospital for three days.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Ticks carry many serious infections. It is wise to check yourself thuroughly if you have been in the forest

Very sensible post.

Some might see that as fear mongering though. Maybe give a trigger warning next time.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Ticks can be in gardens too.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I spray myself before going into the garden.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I spray myself before going into the garden.

I'd rather take my chances with mosquitoes and ticks.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Mickelicious

   I spray myself before going into the garden.

> I'd rather take my chances with mosquitoes and ticks.

Using spray reduces the bites. You can spray with mint oil or a commercial type.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Think the joke was lost on you Brian.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I'd rather take my chances with mosquitoes and ticks.

I ended up in Hospital after a tick latched on to me, i thought it was lyme disease but doctors had no idea ( my fault for going in the forest, wearing shorts), trust me you don't want to get sick from those things. Mosquito borne viruses like dengue, malaria are even worse.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Fear mongering starting? Nothing in the article points to the Oz virus as the cause of death.

Yeah - apart from the fact that it mentions it has been medically confirmed.

Has it been confirmed?

She died of myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle, 26 days after she was hospitalized.

making her case the world's first death by the possibly tick-borne infection

Many more people have died from myocarditis caused by....

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

She died of myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle, 26 days after she was hospitalized.

These cases are becoming more prominent in the past few years.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Has it been confirmed?

Yes, reports from different sites explicitly says the infection was confirmed by testing.

Many more people have died from myocarditis caused by....

covid, but that is obviously not a possibility here.

These cases are becoming more prominent in the past few years.

covid is the cause of the elevation of incidence but it would be practically impossible to think the patient was not tested against it.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Yes, reports from different sites explicitly says the infection was confirmed by testing.

But was the infection confirmed to be the cause of death? No. Especially when you consider that this was "the world's first death by the possibly tick-borne infection".

covid, but that is obviously not a possibility here.

Many more people have died from myocarditis caused by....

She died of myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle, 26 days after she was hospitalized.

These cases are becoming more prominent in the past few years.

Yes, very much so.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Ticks are always some nasty and dangerous little buggers!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

But was the infection confirmed to be the cause of death? No. Especially when you consider that this was "the world's first death by the possibly tick-borne infection".

If an infection by a virus known to be pathogenic is confirmed and the clinical presentation is congruent with what was observed it is perfectly valid for this infoction to be considered the cause of death. The doctors that made that diagnostic are much more knowledgeable about it than people that are uninvolved.

That the virus is not so easily transmitted to people, or that it has not been suspected before are perfectly rational explanations for this to be the first reported death, not necessarily the first time it actually happened.

Many more people have died from myocarditis caused by....

Again, covid. Which is the most common extra cause that elevate the incidence rate, but that is not a realistici possibility here.

Well that settles it then because it was reported .

Confirmed by science you say ?

It was reported by serious sources that the doctors made the diagnostic, what evidence do you have to contradict this?

Confirmed by science you say ?

Oh yes scientifically proven.

Oh no wait they seemed to have disproved their own theory again.

This makes absolutely no sense, the diagnostic is scientific proof, there is not "disproving" of any theory.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

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